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The groves were God's first temples. 



William Cullen Bri 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



ecrefaries. Please Note 

Jow that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
er is on the computer, it is no longer 
ecessary for the financial secretary to 
end in the names of members who die or 
re suspended. Such members are auto- 
latically dropped from the mail list. 

'he only names which the financial sec- 
etary needs to send in are the names of 
lembers who are NOT receiving the mag- 
zine. 

n sending in the names of members who 
re not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
ress forms mailed out with each monthly 
iill should be used. Please see that the 
lip Code of the member is included. When 
member clears out of one Local Union 
ato another, his name is automatically 
iropped from the mail list of the Local 
Jnion he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
ecretary of the Union into which he 
leared should forward his name to the 
Jeneral Secretary for inclusion on the 
aail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
umber. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovttch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS . 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(3£\G3[P@KW 




VOLUME LXXXIX 



No. I 



JANUARY, 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 




IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

The Redwood Controversy 2 

Labor Given Prominent Role in Building Sentinel Defense Network 4 

The Construction Outlook for 1969 7 

Report by Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee 10 

Building Trades Join Metal Trades in Joint Apprentice Effort 17 

New Teeth for Old Saws Jane Goodsell 23 

The Nixon Cabinet Press Associates 24 



DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 1 5 

Editorials 18 

What's New in Apprenticeship 19 

Plane Gossip 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 22 

Local Union News 25 

Of Interest to Our Industrial Locals 29 

Service to the Brotherhood 30 

In Memoriam 36 

What's New 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. Washington. 0. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E.. Washington D. C. 20018. bv the United 
Brotherhood oi Carpenters ana Joiners ot America. Second class postage pa'd at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada 52 per year, single copies 20s in advance. 



Printed In U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Twin giants in Grants Grove. 
Sequoia National Park. California, 
tower majestically above the January 
snow and a lone woodsman. They 
are, as our cover quotation states, 
"God's first temples.'' 

Among such towering trees, says 
William Cullen Bryant, "ere man 
learned to hew the shaft, and lay the 
architrave, and spread the roof above 
them, — ere he framed the lofty vault. 
to gather and roll back the sound of 
anthems; in the darkling wood, amidst 
the cool and silence, he knelt down 
and offered to the Mightiest solemn 
thanks and supplication." 

The redwood is among the tallest 
of trees and is seldom found more 
than 35 miles inland or above 3.000 
feet in elevation. An unusual feature 
is its ability to develop vigorous stump 
sprouts which attain commercial pro- 
portions in a relatively short time — 
30 to 50 years. 

There are more than 70 distinct 
groves of redwoods on the Pacific 
Coast, containing from as few as four 
to as many as 3,500 mature trees, and. 
in many instances, countless numbers 
of seedlings and young trees. 

In 1968 Congress passed legislation 
extending Federal protection to addi- 
tional groves of redwoods. Others, 
meanwhile, are being harvested by the 
busy West Coast lumber industry 
under procedures which conserve the 
supply of these tremendous trees for 
future generations. 





California timber industry 
tights tor realistic conservation 
program, as compromise is reached 
on 35th national park. 




Redwood lumber stacked and drying at a mill 
near Eureka in Humboldt County, California. 



■ Ever since the first civilized 
man gazed in wonder at the tower- 
ing and majestic redwoods of Cali- 
fornia there has been controversy 
over the use or non-use of the big 
trees. 

Should they be used for man's 
economic benefit? The National 
Geographic Society once said that 
cutting redwood for railroad ties was 
like "lighting one's pipe with a Greek 
manuscript to save the trouble of 
reaching for the matches." 

Since they are the fastest growing 
trees known to man, should they be 
harvested like other renewable crops 
. . . cut down and sawed into a 
variety of forest products and grown 
again for a sustained yield of wood 
fibre? 

Should all or some of these tow- 
ering trees be allowed to live out 
their alloted time untouched except 
by the eyes of man? Or should they 
be managed to serve both destinies? 

The questions became pronounced 
as far back as 1852, when the Cali- 
fornia State Legislature sought from 
Congress a law which would have 
prohibited the settlement and occu- 
pation of any land upon which red- 
wood trees were growing. (The ac- 
tion failed.) 

In 1879, the U.S. Secretary of the 
Interior recommended that the Pres- 
ident be authorized to withdraw from 
sale or other disposition an area of 
redwood timber at least equal to two 
townships (46,000 acres). (This, too, 
failed.) 

Down through the years, as op- 
posing views have tugged back and 
forth over the big trees, the State 
of California has acquired for its 
state park system 115,000 acres of 
the most superlative virgin groves of 
the towering trees. The timber 
industry, meanwhile, held in what 
might be called escrow another 6400 
acres of park-like groves, awaiting 
public acquisition. These parks con- 
tain more than 1VS million large 
redwood trees . . . "enough," says 
the National Forest Products Asso- 
ciation, "to make a solid row from 
San Francisco to New York." 

California state parks now con- 
tain 5% of the entire coastal red- 
wood forests, an estimated 18% of 
the saw timber volume, and 29% 
of the saw timber volume in virgin 
groves. 



THE CARPENTER 



Thomas L. Kimball, executive, 
director of the National Wildlife 
Federation, says, "Over-emotional 
statements that the last redwood will 
soon be destroyed are pure bunk." 
. . . This, in spite of the fact that 
California mills harvest more than a 
billion board feet of redwood each 
year. 

The average American citizen — - 
and the average carpenter, who 
works with redwood lumber — has 
been left completely confused by the 
controversy. 

Which conservation plans really 
serve the public interest best? 

A confrontation between the pres- 
ervationists and the timber industry 
occurred last year in Washington. 
D.C. In 1967 the U.S. Senate had 
passed a bill to establish a 64,000 
acre National Redwood Park. The 
Save-the-Redwood League and other 
organizations went back to Congress 
in 1968 to seek a similar bill in the 
House of Representatives. In legisla- 
tion which finally cleared the House, 
the proposed National Redwood 
Park would have been chopped to 
28,500 acres. With this situation, a 
House-Senate compromise was called 
for. 

The preservationists were asking 
Congress to spend $80 million to 
$200 million for the park — the larg- 
est sum ever requested for a na- 
tional park facility. The timber in- 
dustry said that this much was not 
needed. 

Although the 1968 redwood con- 
troversy was over the establishment 
of a park for redwoods growing near 
the California coast, lumber inter- 
ests reminded Congress that a na- 
tional park of Sierra redwoods, cov- 
ering 35,000 acres, has been in ex- 
istence for more than a century. 
Sequoia National Park now preserves 
for posterity in public ownership 
97% of all land upon which the 
Sequoiadendron giganteum, a close 
relative of the Coastal redwood, now 
thrives. 

So the struggle continued over 
how much of the redwood forests 
should be set aside as sanctuaries 
for the world's tallest and second- 
oldest plants. (The bristlecone pine 
is the oldest; the Sequoia and the 
Coast redwoods are next in that 
order.) 



Carpenters know redwood to be 
a light wood, non-resinous, exceed- 
ingly straight grained and durable, 
and resistant to fire, rot and decay. 
No other tree has contributed more 
to the economy and high standard 
of living California residents enjoy 
than the redwood. 

West Coast members of the Broth- 
erhood who work in redwood mills 
can tell you that redwoods are fast 
growing, that logging under new 
techniques provides the means for 
a continuing supply of young, vig- 
orous redwoods to compliment old 
growth stands and that, within 100 
to 500 years time, young trees will 
approach the same height and girth 
of present old growth. Foresters con- 
tend that modern forestry manage- 
ment practices are better for timber 
conservation than leaving forests 
completely untended. So, there was 
this side to the controversy. 

Finally, last September a com- 
promise was reached between the 
House and Senate park bills, and 
the nation's 35th national park was 
established by law. The compromise 
bill called for a 58,000-acre park, 
including three California state parks 
and private timber land worth $92 
million. The acreage includes 27,- 
468 acres of state park land in Hum- 
boldt and Del Norte counties on 
California's north coast. The com- 
promise called for the donation of 
the state park acreage by the Cali- 
fornia State Legislature. 

Designated direct acquisition — 
with title to pass to the Government 
as soon as the President signed the 
bill — were 28,101 acres of privately 
owned timber land. Timber cutting 
on this land stopped immediately 
once the President signed the bill. 

An additional 2431 acres of pri- 
vate land would be subject to desig- 
nation for direct acquisition by the 
Secretary of Interior in fixing the 
final park boundaries. 

Chairman Wayne N. Aspinall (D- 
Colo.) of the House Interior Com- 
mittee, announcing details of the 
compromise agreement, said devel- 
opment of the park is expected to 
cost $10 million. But specific mon- 
etary authorization would depend 
upon adoption of a master plan and 
subsequent congressional action. 

The bill would authorize exchange 



of national forest land in the 14,000- 
acre Northern Redwood Purchase 
Unit for some of the private land to 
be included in the park. An area 
designated as the Yurok Experi- 
mental Forestry Tract in the pur- 
chase unit would be excluded from 
the exchange authority. 

Aspinall said the park would in- 
clude, if California donates state 
park lands, the Jedediah Smith, Del 
Norte Coast and Prairie Creek Red- 
wood State Parks. Two major units 
would be connected by a corridor 
that would include a 33-mile stretch 
of California ocean beach. 

Private lands are to be acquired 
east and south of Jedediah Smith 
State Park, in the vicinity of Klamath 
and south of Prairie Creek State 
Park. 

Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D-Wash.). 
chairman of the Senate Interior Com- 
mittee, said budgetary consideration 
dictated exclusion of the area along 
Skunk Cabbage Creek in Humboldt 
County. But he said the park will 
include 32.500 acres of old growth 
redwoods, including all of the larg- 
est and most impressive trees in both 
the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek 
drainage basins. 

Included, he said, are the Lost 
Man Creek and Little Lost Man 
Creek areas, the Emerald Mile on 
Redwood Creek and two lagoons 
south of Orick. 

"I believe this bill is one of the 
great conservation achievements of 
this or any Congress," he said. 

Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel (R-Calif.). 
who was not present for the final 
meeting of the conferees, applauded 
the compromise in a statement as 
"a victory for conservation and an 
example now and for generations to 
come." 

He said it preserves the finest 
remaining specimens of the coast 
redwood, protects the timber-based 
economy of the area by spreading 
Federal acquisitions among four 
companies and two counties, and 
softens the blow by making some 
Federal limber available as compen- 
sation for park quality kind. 

A half-century of struggle over 
the redwoods has. at least tempo- 
rarily, ended. In retrospect, it ap- 
pears that both the public and pri- 
vate interests have been served. ■ 



JANUARY, 1969 




Labor Given Prominent Role In 
Building Sentinel Defense Network 

President Hutcheson, other union leaders 

briefed by the Military on needs for construction 

tradesmen at strategic sites across the nation 



■ Top labor union officials have been 
briefed by the military on the vital 
role they are to play in the construc- 
tion, testing and installation phases of 
the Sentinel anti-ballistic missile de- 
fense network. 

A program "of the highest national 
priority," Sentinel will be responsible 
for the protection of every U.S. city 
and community from nuclear attack. 
The system is designed primarily as 
a Chinese-Communist deterrent, but 
will also serve as a guard against any 
possible Soviet aggression. 

Earth-moving has begun in the 
Boston area at the first of 15 to 20 
anti-missile-missile launch and/or 
radar sites strategically located from 
coast to coast. All are expected to be 
completed within the next five years, 



INTERCEPT 



and each will require the employment 
of 900 to 1,375 construction workers. 
The completed defense network is to 
cost between $5 and $10 billion. 

The project, according to military 
spokesmen, requires that the work be 
done by team effort — that team con- 
sisting of labor, management, the 
scientific community, and the military. 

Sentinel System Command (SENS- 
COM), which is charged with the 
development, testing, acquisition and 
installation of the system, has made 
it clear that organized labor's "rights 
will be protected" while accomplishing 
this National goal. 

President Hutcheson Attends 

The Sentinel plan was spelled out 
for the leaders of major trade unions 
in a special briefing recently in the 



SPARTAN AND SPRINT 

ENGAGEMENT 



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SENTINEL BATTERY 



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The nation's defense from ballistic missile attack will depend largely on the Sentinel 
system's tracking abilities and the Spartan and Sprint missiles' effectiveness in 
destroying the invading weaponry in mid-air, as illustrated here. 



AFL-CIO building in Washington, 
D.C. On hand to explain the program 
and to answer labor's questions were 
officials of the project, Corps of En- 
gineers, and other civilian and military 
groups set up to implement construc- 
tion. 

Included among the union leaders 
attending the conference were M. A. 
Hutcheson, Carpenters' General Pres- 
ident, AFL-CIO Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department Presi- 
dent C. J. Haggerty and Secretary 
Frank Bonadio. 

The importance of Sentinel is such 
that the project was exempted from 
severe budget cutting felt by other 
government agencies in recent months. 

Labor-Management 
Cooperation Asked 

Of interest to labor is the fact that 
the military role in the effort is: To 
remain neutral during labor-manage- 
ment disputes', to encourage voluntary 
utilization of procedures for dispute 
settlement in lieu of work stoppages; 
to maintain and extend an open-door 
policy on individual sites and at com- 
mand levels to labor and management; 
and to promote open communication 
and a spirit of genuine cooperation 
among team members. 

A Senscom officer further made it 
clear that "The army, its contractors 
and contractor-employees' unions must 
strive to serve their respective interests 
in a manner befitting the status of 
Sentinel employment as one of national 
priority. The avoidance of lockouts 
and work stoppages is necessary if this 
nation is to meet the projected Chinese 
Communist threat of the mid-70's. 
Utilization of grievance procedures 
and existing machinery to resolve dis- 
putes will insure accomplishing this 
national goal while protecting the 
rights of the involved parties and pro- 
viding for orderly solutions to the 
problems which arise." 



THE CARPENTER 




Union carpenters and other tradesmen will soon be building more than a dozen 
Sentinel radar batteries like the one in this artist's drawing. Construction is expected 
to take an average of 22 months at each site, plus additional time for installation 
of facilities within the buildings. 



$50 Million Sites 

Construction of the Sentinel facil- 
ities are of such magnitude that a great 
number of skilled tradesmen will be 
required in various parts of the coun- 
try. The locations of 13 of the sites 
has been announced. They are: San 
Francisco; Los Angeles; Sedalia, Mis- 
souri; Albany, Georgia; Chicago; 
Dallas; Grand Forks, North Dakota; 
New York City: Oahu, Hawaii; Salt 
Lake City; Seattle; Detroit, and 
Boston. 

Most of the locations were chosen 
because of their proximity to heavily 
populated areas, others because they 
are near U.S. offensive missile sites 
that require protection. 

Each radar site alone will cover 250 
acres. To be constructed on each will 
be a radar building, a large electrical- 
power plant, living quarters and other 
structures. Most sites will have be- 
tween 400 and 700 men permanently 
deployed and each will cost about $50 
million, not including the cost of radar 
and computers, nor the missiles or 
missile silos themselves. 

Army personnel outlined specific 
plans for development of the various 
missile and radar sites to the labor 
leaders attending the briefing. 

The first phase of construction will 
be accomplished by the Corps of En- 
gineers through construction contrac- 
tors, and the second phase will consist 
of installation and testing, which pri- 



marily concerns the weapon system 
contractors. 

The construction phase at each of 
the sites will average about 22 months. 
Construction at several sites will be 
going on at the same time. 

The installation and test phase gen- 
erally will begin at the completion of 
the construction phase. 

Work Force Described 

At the peak of construction the 
Corps of Engineers contractor will 
have between 900 and 1.375 construc- 
tion workers on a single site, depend- 
ing on which of two types of installa- 
tions are involved. Also present on-site 
during construction will be an initial 
force of 10 military and government 



civilian personnel from SENSCOM 
which will build up to a total number 
ranging from 30 to nearly 70, again 
depending on the type of installation. 

Further, the Army Strategic Com- 
munications Command will have about 
100 people working at the site, includ- 
ing military personnel, civilian work- 
ers and crafsmen doing installation 
work by contract. 

Then, during the installation and 
test phase, the Army Air Defense Com- 
mand will move in a troop force of 
approximately 500 men to be engaged 
with training on weapon system hard- 
ware, operation and maintenance and 
communications. 

Carpenters, Others Needed 

The weapon system contractor will 
hire a considerable number of men 
during the first three months of this 
phase for subcontracted work. These 
include carpenters, riggers, plumbers, 
welders, pipefitters and electricians, 
and will involve the installation of 
heavy-duty equipment such as trans- 
formers, motor-control equipment and 
transmitter control equipment. 

During the installation and test 
phase the contractor will have from 
150 to 385 electronics installers at a 
site, plus another 70 military, civilian 
and contractor personnel representing 
the Army Strategic Communications 
Command. 

The basic responsibility for handling 
labor relations at the Sentinel sites. 
Army spokesmen indicated, is placed 
upon management and labor. "How- 
ever," they say, "both in the construc- 
tion and installation phases of this pro- 
gram, the Army plans to have at Head- 
quarters Command offices and at the 
sites personnel who will act as labor 
advisors to the Commanding Officers 
and act in a liason capacity with labor, 
management and other governmental 
agencies." ■ 




Drawing of Sentinel installation with the missile farms and support facilities — all of 
which Carpenters will help build. Site has an underground power station and above- 
ground offices and living quarters located in 220 to 250-acre area. 



JANUARY, 1969 




3— J 





ROUNDUP 



BY THE YEAR 1980, if the production schedule set forth in the Housing Act of 1968 
is followed, there will "be no substandard dwelling units in any American communi- 
ty. That's what Housing and Urban Development Under Secretary Robert C. Wood has 
said in a speech stressing the need for the $60 "billion investment called for in 
the new law. 

LABOR DIRECTORY— The U.S. Department of Labor has published a new "Register of Re- 
porting Labor Organizations." It includes a listing of 51,284 international and 
local unions along with other labor movement vital statistics. The price is $2.50 
per copy from the U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. 

THE ANNUAL MOTOR VEHICLE MILEAGE rolled up on U.S. highways topped the one tril- 
lion mark for the first time in 1968. This not-too-surprising fact was reported 
recently by the Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration. 

THE NEW UNION DIRECTORY of the U.S. Department of Labor shows that although New 
York State has the largest number of labor union members (2.5 million), West Vir- 
ginia has the highest proportion of organized employees in non-agriculture indus- 
tries (44%) . 

OUR DOLLAR DRAIN has finally stopped ... at least temporarily . . . The U.S. 
chalked up a slender $35 million payments surplus in the third quarter of 1968. 
This was the first time our international accounts went into the black since the 
spring of 1965. 

A RECORD LOAD of cases is flooding the National Labor Relations Board as fiscal 
year 1969 begins. The NLRB also reports a heavy backlog of business awaiting dis- 
position. The Board reported in its most recent quarterly summary that 7,700 new 
cases were received from individuals, unions and employers, compared with 7,518 
for the same three months a year earlier — a rise of nearly 3 percent. 

ELECTION AFTERMATH— The General Services Administration has a problem on its hands 
— namely 45,000 pictures of President Johnson. Many of them have adorned the 
walls of government offices here and throughout the country. Others have been in 
GSA storage. 

Unless anyone thinks this is a Democratic spending waste, the expectation is 
that 45,000 pictures of President-elect Nixon will soon be replacing LBJ. 

GENERAL ELECTION RESULTS showed that Richard Nixon carried Humphrey, N.Y. , but 
Hubert Humphrey carried Nixon, Texas. However, George Wallace ran last in Wal- 
lace, Calif.; Wallace, Ind. ; Wallace, W. Va. ; and Wallace, Mo. 



LIFETIME WARRANTY-In the view of one of the five Federal Trade Commissioners, the 
FTC should require automakers to provide lifetime warranties for their cars 
even when they have moved onto the used car market. 

Commissioner Philip Elman attached the observation to an FTC staff study 
made public recently charging automakers with stressing sales at the expense of 
proper warranty service and repair operation. 

6 THE CARPENTER 



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The prognosticators foresee another 

record year for the building industry 

as restless Americans continue to shift gears. 



Commerce Prediction 



1969 Construction Spending 
To Set $91 Billion Record 



The building and construction 
trades heard cheering news from the 
Department of Commerce which has 
announced that new construction is 
expected to hit $91 billion during 
1969, an increase of 7 percent 
over 1968 and a new record. 

The Department estimates that 
private housing starts will number 
1,660,000 units, the highest volume 
since 1955 and an improvement of 
135,000 units over 1968. 

Privately owned construction is 
estimated at $61.6 billion of which 
new housing units will cost about 
$25.4 billion. 

"Private construction," the De- 
partment said, "completed a re- 
covery this year (1968) in new hous- 
ing starts. A peak of 1,900.000 
units was set in 1950 when post-war 
housing shortages were being met." 



The Commerce report said that 
little change in the high interest 
rates of 1968 can be expected, but 
it declared that builders will find it 
easier to obtain funds for housing 
because of the impact of Govern- 
ment fiscal and monetary policies 
started this year. 

The non-residential category of 
industrial and commercial building 
will show relatively strong increases. 
New industrial building is expected 
to increase by $300,000,000 over 
the year to $5.6 billion, while com- 
mercial building will go up by 
$400,000,000 to $8.6 billion. This 
latter, however, is a sharp reduction 
from the 17 percent boost in 1968. 

"Comfortable" increases in 1968 
farm income are expected to spur 
a 4 percent gain to $1.36 billion. 

There will be a slackening in 



overall dollar expenditures for new 
construction in public utilities 
which will increase by 2 percent as 
compared with 14 percent in 1968. 
"Strong advances shown by pub- 
lic construction in the last few years 
will continue, although the antici- 
pated 6 percent growth is less than 
that for the last two years," the 
Commerce Department said. "The 
value increase from $27.7 billion to 
$29.4 billion represents rising con- 
struction costs and a moderately 
higher physical volume. The 10 per- 
cent proportion of Federal-owned 
construction in total public construc- 
tion expenditures will be the lowest 
in many years." 

This drop in Federal building is 
largely due to the Congressional 
economy drive. 

On the other hand, highways and 
streets and education buildings con- 
tinue to benefit from substantial 
Federal aid. In terms of dollars, 
these areas represent the largest 
segment of public construction and 
will account for more than half — 
$16.6 billion — of the category's total 
value in 1969. 



F. W. Dodge Prediction 

Housing Will Lead the Way 
To Busy Construction Year 



■ Housing will lead the way to big 
construction gains in 1969, the F. 
W. Dodge Corp., industry bell- 
wether, told 500 construction indus- 
try leaders at a Washington meeting 
recently. 

George Christie, chief economist 
for F. W. Dodge, told the gathering 



that conditions are right for a big 
year in home building. Last year's 
strong flow of savings into mort- 
gage lending institutions brought 
the rate of housing starts back to 
the 1.5-million unit level. By spring, 
however, inflation at home and con- 
tinued deficits abroad forced a re- 



turn to credit restraint. As a result, 
savings flows diminished, mortgage 
rates rose to a new high and hous- 
ing starts slipped back to the 1.3- 
million rate. 

Since mid-1968, the pendulum 
has begun to swing back in the 
direction of credit ease, although 
it is taking longer than anyone ex- 
pected for the tax and budget re- 
straints to do their job. And with 
the Federal Reserve again threaten- 
ing to reimpose credit curbs tem- 
porarily unless the rising price level 
yields, it could be several months 
before any real monetary ease is felt 
in the mortgage markets. 



JANUARY, 1969 



But, said Christie, if credit is all 
that is holding back a housing boom, 
then 1969 should be the year. De- 
mand — as indicated by the low va- 
cancy rate for rental housing, the 
small inventory of unsold homes 
and the intensity of the search for 
solutions to the urban housing prob- 
lem — is stronger than ever. 

This year's opening rate of 1.5- 
million housing units will be boosted 
to the 1.6-million mark by mid- 
year as more favorable mortgage 
rates draw some postponed demand 
from hiding, according to the fore- 
cast. 

Then late this summer, the 
housing market will begin to feel 
a secondary thrust as public housing 
programs take on more important 
roles. 

For 1969 as a whole, housing 
starts will number about 1.6-million 
units. Contract values for one and 
two-family homes will increase 15 
percent and apartment contract 
values will climb 10 percent. Sales 



of about 350,000 mobile homes will 
fill out 1969's total shelter demand 
to about 2-million homes. 

During 1968 the value of con- 
tracts for construction of schools, 
hospitals and churches barely 
matched the record achieved in 
1967. But in 1969, F. W. Dodge 
forecast, a modest gain of 4 percent 
can be anticipated in total educa- 
tional building contracts and the 
growth in outlays for hospital con- 
struction should climb to $2.2-bil- 
lion. 

Although the Federal budget 
squeeze will limit Federal backing 
of many public construction pro- 
grams temporarily, there is the pos- 
sibility of offsetting expansion of 
state and municipal support, F. W. 
Dodge found. Easier credit condi- 
tions this year could stimulate a 
higher volume of bond issues to pro- 
vide funds for local construction. 

Contract values for street, high- 
way and bridge building should 
make a 10 percent gain, up to about 
$7.2-billion. 



Construction of sewer and water 
systems will have another good year, 
with sewer systems contributing the 
most to an anticipated 9 percent 
gain that should take contract values 
to $2.5-biIlion. 

The total 1969 value for all com- 
munity facilities, including public 
buildings, airports, and recreational 
facilities, was estimated by Christie 
at $15.2-billion for a 10 percent in- 
crease. 

Business-related contsruction mar- 
kets, said F. W. Dodge, are headed 
for a sluggish first half. Neverthe- 
less, early reports of plans for bus- 
iness capital outlays indicate an in- 
crease this year of at least 5%. 

Industrial building contracts 
should be up about 3 percent to 
$3.7-billion. Commercial building 
should climb 4 percent to $7.2-bil- 
lion. Utilities construction, although 
high by recent standards, will de- 
cline 11 percent to $2.7-billion. A 
large 1968 total was swelled by con- 
tracts for huge installations that will 
be built over the next few years. ■ 



ENR Prediction 



Construction Financing Is 
Still Key to Year's Promise 



B The new year could be the biggest 
ever for new contracts, the publica- 
tion Engineering News-Record told 
its readers recently. 

It noted, however, that the cost 
of construction financing continues 
to be the key to the rate of growth 
in the construction market. 

"There is little doubt that a heavy 
volume of new work piled up on the 
drawing boards as interest rates 
soared to record highs earlier this 
year," ENR stated. "With prospects 
of easier credit conditions early next 
year, much of this backlog will ad- 
vance to the bidding stage. Design- 
ers have signed up an enormous 
amount of work in the past three 
years that has been tied up because 
of financing problems." 

Engineering News-Record anti- 
cipates an overall gain of 6% in 
new contracts during 1969. Design 



firms foresee a bright outlook for 
construction of school and college 
buildings, hospital and medical 
facilities, pollution control projects, 
apartments and office buildings. 

As in 1968, most water use and 
control projects will be sewage 
treatment plants, pumping plants, 
and sewer lines. This sector is ex- 
pected to provide $1.6 billion worth 
of contracts in 1969. 

Pollution control work has shifted 
into high gear, with more Federal 
grant and loan money becoming 
available and added Federal pres- 
sure for local governments and in- 
dustry to take steps to halt pollu- 
tion. 

The magazine reports that water- 
works construction "appears to be 
taking a back seat" because of the 
current emphasis on pollution prob- 
lems. Despite the fact that more Fed- 



eral funds are being made available 
for municipal waterworks, contracts 
in this area are expected to fall 
slightly below 1968 levels. 

The cu^ook for other water re- 
sources development appears bleak, 
too. As Congress attemp'ed to shift 
from a $2.5-bil!ion deficit for fiscal 
1968 to a $5-billion deficit in 1969, 
less sensitive Federal construction 
programs felt the ax. ENR expects 
the most likely victims to be Corps 
of Engineers and Bureau of Rec- 
lamation projects, with fewer con- 
struction starts slated for 1969 and 
many current projects curtailed. 

Contracts awarded by the elec- 
tric, gas, and communications in- 
dustries are expected to climb 
sharply this year on the strength 
of a strong resurgence in electric 
utility contract awards. Many plants 
scheduled for completion in 1970 
and 1971 will be awarded this year. 

The construction of office build- 
ings, which has been in high gear in 
an effort to keep up with demand, 
is expected to slow somewhat. 
Although vacancy rates in new of- 
fice buildings remain low, plans for 
(Continued on page 10) 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



Tax Reform Called Essential 
In Solving Nation's Problems 



Tax reform is essential to the 
massive public investment needed to 
overcome America's accumulated 
social and economic problems, AFL- 
CIO Pres. George Meany stresses in 
an article written for a prestigious 
academic journal. 

The article, "Labor Looks at 
Government Finances." appears in 
the Annals of the American Acad- 
emy of Political and Social Science. 

It discusses the impact of the 
"rapid and radical changes in tech- 
nology, urban growth and race rela- 
tions." 

It notes the problems created be- 
cause "millions of people have been 
leaving depressed rural areas of de- 
clining job opportunities to seek 
their future in the cities. Additional 
millions have been moving from 
cities to suburbs. Industry, too, has 
been leaving the city for suburbs 
and outlying areas." 

The article warns that the public 
investment in facilities and services 
— however large it may appear in 
dollar terms — has not been adequate 
to meet the backlog of needs and 
keep up with rapid changes. 

As a result, Meany points out, 
education and public transportation 
have deteriorated in large cities, air 
and water pollution have become 
major problems, housing for the 
lower income families has been 
grossly inadequate. And a significant 
minority of the nation has had little 
share of national prosperity. 

Can the states, cities and private 
industry overcome these problems? 

Meany thinks not. They can help, 
he says; they can do more than they 
have done. But he adds: 

"The key to the national complex 
of social and economic problems is 
federal government policy, funds 
and planned programs over the next 
10 to 20 years — with state and local 
government initiative and additional 
funds to carry through the nation- 
wide efforts at the local level." 

Meany emphasizes labor's posi- 
tion that the government must be: 

• "The employer of last resort — 
to create jobs for the unemployed 



IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS 
$40 



30 



n 



20 



THE GROWTH IN STATE 
AND LOCAL SPENDING 
Fiscal Years 1957-1967 



State and Local Funds 
Federal Funds 




1957 1967 1957 1967 1957 1967 1957 1967 

EDUCATION HIGHWAYS PUBLIC HEALTH & 

WELFARE HOSPITALS 

Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census. 



The chart ahove, which appeared December 14 in the AFL-CIO News indicates the 
tremendous growth in state and local spending in the past decade. In most cases, such 
spending has far exceeded "matching funds" supplied by Federal legislation. 



and seriously underemployed in pro- 
viding needed public services. 

• "The landlord of last resort — 
to build and rehabilitate housing that 
poor people can afford." 

But can the government, itself, af- 
ford this? 

Yes, Meany insists. The growth in 
the national economy will generate 
additional revenue. But. he stresses. 
to gain continued public support for 
heavy federal expenditures, the pub- 
lic must be convinced of the fairness 
of the taxation system. 

The fact is that we don't have an 
equitable tax system, even though 
it is superior to most state and local 
tax structures. 



Specifically. Meany proposes 
"elimination of those gross inequities 
that impose full tax rates on work- 
ers' earnings while there are various 
loopholes that permit wealthy peo- 
ple and corporations to escape pay- 
ment of full tax rates and. in some 
cases, to escape from paying any 
federal taxes at all." 

He calls also for reform of State 
and local tax policies, consolidation 
of small local government jurisdic- 
tions and a federal tax credit for 
state income lax payments to en- 
courage states to base taxation on 
ability to pay. 

Meany firmly rejects the conserv- 
ative call for "no strings" handovei 



JANUARY, 1969 



MAJOR GOVERNMENT TAX SOURCES, Fiscal Year 1966-1967 

FEDERAL STATE LOCAL 



INCOME 




SALES SALES 
(EXCISE) 

r- OTHER 



INCOME 




SALES 
INCOME 
OTHER 



PROPERTY 
OTHER 




PROPERTY 



$115.0 BILLION 



$31.9 BILLION 



$29.3 BILLION 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census. 



The chart above, also from the AFL-CIO News, shows the main sources of revenue for the three levels of government. With 
overlapping responsibilities in many areas, Federal, state, and local financial administrators are bogged down in a morass of "too 
little funds too late to do any good." 



Tax Reform Essential 

(Continued from preceding page) 

of federal money to the states. 
"Since unconditional grants would 
not be tied to specific programs, 
there is no assurance they would not 
be used for less urgent or even waste- 
ful purposes," he notes. Nor could 
enforcement of federal civil rights 
or labor standards be assured. 

Genuine problems resulting from 
uncoordinated grant programs can 
be overcome by less drastic rem- 
edies, Meany suggests. 

Basically, his article insists, 
"America has the manpower, skills 
and productive ability to achieve 
solutions" to the nation's problems. 
Its failures to do so have been the 
result of the lack of a firm political 
majority committed to the needed 
programs. 

1969 Construction 

(Continued from page 8) 

new office-building construction are 
below 1967's record volume. 

ENR concludes that apartment 
construction awards are headed for 
another gain in 1969 on top of the 
startling 25% rise in 1968. Although 
mortgage rates remain high, less 
pressures on capital markets in 
1969 are expected to relieve some 
of the pressure on rates and in- 
crease the flow of money to savings 
and loan institutions. In this climate, 
says ENR, apartment awards and 
starts on owner-builder projects will 
climb another 9%. ■ 



Postwar Babies to Create Peak Housing 
Demand by Mid-1970s, Say Economists 



An explosion in America's hous- 
ing patterns may occur by the mid- 
1970s, some economists tell us. 

Economists studying housing 
trends are comparing the impact 
of large numbers of youthful home 
seekers on the nation's housing mar- 
ket to what those same young people 
did to education a few years ago. 

Fabian Linden, an economist with 
the National Industrial Conference 
Board, has said the explosion will 
be felt fully in 1975 but the trends 
are developing right now. 

Mr. Linden says all those babies 
born after World War II and 
through the early 1950's are getting 
old enough to get married and have 
homes of their own. 

The impact of this explosion on 
homes, their number, design, size 
and availability will be tremendous. 
The impact on marketing and ad- 
vertising approaches and the kinds 
of products made and sold in all 
areas will be dramatic. 

The impact on America's business 
and consumer habits and on the 
economy in general may be, in Mr. 
Linden's term, "traumatic." 

In 1950 there were slightly more 
than 20 million children enrolled 
in grade schools. Ten years later, 
the number had mushroomed to 
more than 32 million. 

Today, 23 years after the end 
of World War II, there are 6.5 mil- 
lion students in the nation's colleges 
and universities. Only eight years 
ago, the figure was 3.5 million. 



Now the impact moves to the 
marriage graphs. Back in the early 
1950's, about 1.5 million couples 
were married each year. The num- 
ber dropped slightly in the early 
1960's but today it has risen to 
nearly 2 million marriages a year. 

By 1975, Mr. Linden estimates 
that 2.3 million couples will be get- 
ting married and looking for that 
first home each year. 

Mr. Linden argues with the em- 
phasis given to the under-25-year- 
old group of consumers on the hous- 
ing economy. While this will be a 
large category, only 10 per cent will 
own homes and their percentage of 
the total number of households in 
the nation will increase from 6 per 
cent to only 8 per cent by 1975. 

By 1975, Mr. Linden says, the 
25-to-34-year-old group will in- 
crease from 10 million households 
to 15 million or 22 per cent of the 
total. 

Eighty per cent of these homes 
will have children, Mr. Linden says, 
and 40 per cent of them will own 
homes. 

Almost 30 per cent will have pro- 
fessional or technical jobs or will 
be executives. About 55 per cent 
will have incomes in the $5,000 to 
$10,000 range, while 20 per cent 
will have incomes in excess of 
$10,000. 

The people in this group will be 
better educated and their prefer- 
ences and choices will set the trend 
for America in the years to come. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



THE RETURNS ARE IN... 

CUC Produced Results in 'SB 



■ During the past year, some 600 
local unions contributed to the Car- 
penters Legislative Improvement Com- 
mittee. A list of the local unions 
which contributed is herewith pre- 
sented. 

Most of the money raised by CLIC 
for political action came from the 
voluntary contributions of General 
Executive Board Members and Rep- 
resentatives. All members of the 
Board donated 1 Vi % of their salaries 
to the CLIC fund. Representatives 
donated 1 % . A good deal of the 
funds contributed to CLIC came from 
voluntary contributions made by dele- 
gates to state council conventions. 

Through the voluntary donations 
collected by CLIC some 1 1 3 Con- 
gressmen particularly friendly to labor 
were given assistance in the recent 
election. Of these, 1 1 1 were re-elected 
and are back in Congress. In the 
Senate, the record was not quite as 
good. Four senators who had our 
support did not weather the election. 

The question naturally arises, what 
has CLIC done for our members? 

While Situs Picketing and the Re- 
peal of 14-b did not make the grade, 
a good deal of legislation which 
means dollars and cents to our mem- 
bers was passed with the help of our 
friends in the Congress. 

We were successful in getting drastic 
restrictions on the export of logs to 
Japan. This will help to stop the clos- 
ing of West Coast mills because of in- 
sufficient log supplies. Several thou- 
sand of our members in the lumber 
industry have already lost their jobs 
because mills had to close for a lack 
of logs. Without the export restric- 
tions more were destined to close. 

Construction workers, too, will 
benefit from the log export restric- 



tions, because Japanese competition 
has driven the cost of stumpage sky 
high. This has reflected itself in con- 
stantly increasing prices for lumber 
and plywood. Higher prices for these 
items has meant greater substitution of 
other materials, many of which other 
trades lay claim to. 

We were also successful in getting 
Davis-Bacon provisions included in 
the Secondary Highway Bill. This 
means that pre-determined wage rates 
henceforth will be included in sec- 
ondary highway bids. This should in- 
sure better wage rates for our mem- 
bers working on highways and also 
make it easier to organize in this field. 

We were also successful in getting 
Davis-Bacon provisions included in all 
titles of the Housing Act passed in the 
last session of Congress. This, too, 
ought to mean dollars and cents in the 
pockets of many of our members. 

In addition, we made a break- 
through in getting Davis-Bacon pro- 
visions included in lease-back construc- 
tion. Many post offices and other 
Federal buildings are being con- 
structed through lease-back arrange- 
ments. Under such arrangements, a 
private speculator puts up a struc- 
ture and leases it back to the govern- 
ment. Since private funds are in- 
volved in such construction, it has 
been impossible up to now to get 
Davis-Bacon provisions included in 
the contracts. However, the Union 
Station in Washington is to be con- 
verted to a visitors' center through a 
lease-back arrangement. For the first 
time, Davis-Bacon provisions are in- 
cluded. This means that it will be 
possible to get Davis-Bacon provi- 
sions included in other lease-back con- 
tracts so that inroads can be made on 



the non-union construction which goes 
the lease-back route. 

Another important bill which was 
successfully pushed through the Con- 
gress was the Seasonality Study Bill. 
As every construction worker knows, 
the construction industry is far too 
seasonal in nature. A good deal of 
time is lost during winter months. 
Other nations have worked out vari- 
ous schemes for encouraging construc- 
tion during the months when our in- 
dustry is generally slowed down to a 
walk. The Seasonality Bill authorizes 
the Federal government to make a 
study of the seasonality picture as a 
forerunner to programs aimed at re- 
ducing the seasonality of the industry. 

All of these measures were backed 
by our Brotherhood, and our efforts 
contributed a good deal to their pas- 
sage. Without CLIC and the support 
we could give friendly Congressmen. 
the chances are that none of these 
measures would have passed. 

In addition, a good deal of social 
legislation was enacted by the last 
Congress. Bills to protect the con- 
sumer were made law. Other bills 
for aiding education, increasing Social 
Security, etc., were also passed. 

To those individuals and Locals 
which supported CLIC must go a 
good deal of the credit for the progress 
which has been made. With a new ad- 
ministration taking over, it is even 
more important that CLIC be 
strengthened and given greater support. 

The dollars and cents returns which 
have accrued to our members through 
the work of CLIC cannot be esti- 
mated, but there is little doubt but that 
many of our members will be getting 
better wages and more work because 
of the efforts which CLIC has put 
forth. 



CUC 



CONTRIBUTIONS, 1968 CAMPAIGN 



L.U. No. City & State Amount 
ALABAMA 

Fort Payne, Ala. $ 13.00 
ARIZONA 

Kingman, Ariz. 9.00 

Phoenix. Ariz. 2.00 
CALIFORNIA 

34 San Francisco, Calif. 34.00 

42 San Francisco. Calif. 35.00 

162 San Mateo, Calif. 23.00 



2429 

445 
1089 



L.U. No. City & State 

316 San Jose. Calif. 

483 San Francisco. Calif. 

1062 Santa Barbara. Calif. 

1497 East Los Angeles. Calif. 

1570 Marysville. Calif. 

2006 Los Gatos. Calif. 

2078 Vista. Calif. 

2114 Napa. Calif. 

2375 Los Angeles. Calif. 

2435 Inglewood, Calif. 



mber 11 


3, 1968 






Amount 


L.U. No 


, City & State 


Amount 


20.00 




CONNECTICUT 




37.00 


30 


New London. Conn. 


60.00 


10.00 


43 


Hartford. Conn. 


80.00 


. 60.00 


79 


New Haven. Conn. 


80.00 


35.00 


97 


New Britain. Conn. 


10.00 


30.00 


lis 


Bridgeport. Conn. 


10.00 


13.00 


127 


Derby. Conn. 


20.00 


12.00 


1»(, 


Greenv. ich, ' onn. 


10.00 


20.00 


210 


Stamford. Conn. 


20.00 


4S.50 


216 


Torrington, Conn. 


10.00 



JANUARY, 1969 



11 



L.U. No. City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No 


. City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No. 


. City & State 


Amount 


409 


New Canaan, Conn. 


10.00 


113 


Chesterton, Ind. 


10.00 


831 


Arlington, Mass. 


10.00 


647 


Fairfield. Conn. 


10.00 


215 


Lafayette, Ind. 


50.00 


847 


Natick, Mass. 


10.00 


746 


Norwalk. Conn. 


28.00 


232 


Fort Wayne, Ind. 


50.00 


858 


Clinton, Mass. 


10.00 


825 


Willimantic, Conn. 


20.00 


274 


Vincennes, Ind. 


60.00 


860 


Framingham, Mass. 


95.00 


952 


Bristol, Conn. 


10.00 


365 


Marion. Ind. 


10.00 


862 


Wakefield, Mass. 


10.00 


1700 


Wilton, Conn. 


10.00 


413 


South Bend, Ind. 


20.00 


866 


Norwood, Mass. 


20.00 


1941 


Hartford, Conn. 


20.00 


436 


New Albany, Ind. 


20.00 


878 


Beverly, Mass. 


22.00 




DELAWARE 




599 


Hammond, Ind. 


40.00 


885 


Woburn, Mass. 


20.00 








694 


Boonville, Ind. 


10.00 


888 


Salem, Mass. 


20.00 


1545 


Wilmington, Del. 


20.00 


758 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


40.00 


910 


Gloucester, Mass. 


10.00 




DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


985 


Gary, Ind. 


130.00 


1035 


Taunton, Mass. 


59.00 


132 


Washington, D.C. 


75.00 


1003 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


1.00 


1121 


Boston. Mass. 


10.00 


1590 


Washington. D.C. 


68.00 


1076 


Washington, Ind. 


20.00 


1144 


Danvers, Mass. 


10.00 


1694 


Washington, D.C. 


15.00 


1110 


East Chicago, Ind. 


70.00 


1210 


Salem, Mass. 


20.00 


2456 


Washington. D.C. 


17.00 


1142 


Lawrenceburg, Ind. 


10.00 


1305 


Fall River, Mass. 


40.00 




FLORIDA 




1236 


Michigan City. Ind. 


50.00 


1479 


Walpole, Mass. 


52.00 


405 
531 
696 

727 


Miami, Fla. 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Tampa, Fla. 
Hialeah. Fla. 


40.00 


1317 


East Chicago, Ind. 


40.00 


1503 


Amherst, Mass. 


10.00 


40.00 
10.00 
40.00 


1465 
1485 


Frankford, Ind. 
LaPorte, Ind. 


20.00 
30.00 


1531 
1550 


Rockland, Mass. 
Braintree, Mass. 


10.00 
20.00 


1664 


Bloomington, Ind. 


10.00 


1593 


Concord. Mass. 


10.00 


819 


West Palm Beach, Fla. 


120.50 


1899 


Hobart, Ind. 


20.00 


1610 


Lowell, Mass. 


43.00 


993 


Miami. Fla. 


20.00 


2441 


Corydon, Ind. 


10.00 


2168 


Boston, Mass. 


40.00 


1250 


Homestead. Fla. 


40.00 


2670 


Goshen. Ind. 


10.00 




MICHIGAN 




1275 
1308 
1379 
1394 
1509 


Clearwater. Fla. 
Lake Worth, Fla. 
North Miami, Fla. 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Miami, Fla. 


10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
70.00 
60.00 


2748 
2818 
2944 
3000 
3228 


Rensselaer, Ind. 
Monticello, Ind. 
Goshen, Ind. 
Crown Pt.. Ind. 
Winchester, Ind. 


10.00 
40.00 
4.00 
20.00 
10.00 


19 

26 

100 

116 

297 


Detroit. Mich. 

East Detroit, Mich. 
Muskegon, Mich. 
Bay City, Mich. 
Kalamazoo. Mich. 


59.00 

20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
80.00 


1510 


Tampa, Fla. 


10.00 




IOWA 




334 


Saginaw. Mich. 


10.00 


1554 


Miami. Fla. 


10.00 


4 


Davenport, Iowa 


34.00 


335 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


50.00 


1641 


Naples, Fla. 


10.00 


308 


Cedar Rapids. Iowa 


10.00 


337 


Detroit, Mich. 


20.00 


1685 


Pineda, Fla. 


10.00 


523 


Keokuk, Iowa 


20.00 


512 


Ann Arbor, Mich. 


30.00 


1725 


Daytona Beach, Fla. 


10.00 


534 


Burlington, Iowa 


41.00 


898 


St. Joseph, Mich. 


10.00 


1947 


Hollywood, Fla. 


20.00 








958 


Marquette, Mich. 


10.00 


1966 


Miami, Fla. 


10.00 




KENTUCKY 




982 


Detroit, Mich. 


20.00 


2024 


Miami. Fla. 


204.00 


1080 


Ovvensboro, Ky. 


50.00 


998 


Royal Oak, Mich. 


20.00 


2368 


Valparaiso, Fla. 


10.00 








1033 


Muskegon, Mich. 


26.00 


2770 


West Palm Beach, Fla. 


20.00 




LOUISIANA 




1067 


Port Huron, Mich. 


10.00 


2795 


Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 


20.00 


2192 


Ruston, La. 


10.00 


1102 


Detroit, Mich. 


20.00 


3206 


Pompano Beach, Fla. 


10.00 


2258 


Houma, La. 


48.00 


1191 


Lansing, Mich. 


20.00 


3230 


Stuart. Fla. 


10.00 


3101 


Oakdale, La. 


30.00 


1301 


Monroe, Mich. 


32.00 




IDAHO 




3177 


Holden, La. 


15.00 


1373 


Flint, Mich. 


50.00 


2816 


Emmett. Idaho 


40.00 




MASSACHUSETTS 




1449 


Lansing, Mich. 


10.00 


3046 
21 


Boise. Idaho 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago. III. 


3.00 
21.00 


33 
40 
48 


Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Fitchburg, Mass. 


240.00 

310.00 

30.00 


1452 
1615 
1654 
1908 


Detroit, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Midland, Mich. 
Holland. Mich. 


20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 


58 


Chicago. III. 


200.00 


49 


Lowell, Mass. 


40.00 


2026 


Coldwater. Mich. 


30.00 


62 


Chicago. 111. 


63.00 


51 


Boston. Mass. 


80.00 


2252 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


10.00 


80 


Chicago. 111. 


711.00 


56 


Boston. Mass. 


60.00 


2265 


Detroit, Mich. 


90.00 


169 


East St. Louis, 111. 


10.00 


67 


Boston, Mass. 


60.00 


2365 


Detroit, Mich. 


5.00 


242 
272 
341 


Chicago. 111. 
Chicago Heights, 111. 
Chicago, III. 


53.00 
19.00 
20.00 


82 

96 

107 


Haverhill, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 


50.00 
47.00 
30.00 


2585 
2703 


Saginaw, Mich. 
Grand Rapids. Mich. 


10.00 
10.00 


347 


Mattoon, 111. 


40.00 


111 


Lawrence, Mass. 


130.00 




MINNESOTA 




461 


Highwood, 111. 


80.00 


157 


Boston, Mass. 


20.00 


548 


Minneapolis. Minn. 


42.00 


480 


Freeburg. III. 


60.00 


177 


Springfield, Mass. 


150.00 


766 


Albert Lea, Minn. 


17.00 


496 


Kankakee, 111. 


20.00 


193 


North Adams, Mass. 


100.00 




MISSISSIPPI 




604 


Murphysboro, 111. 


12.00 


218 


Boston, Mass. 


282.00 






633 


Madison, 111. 


41.00 


222 


Westfield, Mass. 


30.00 


387 


Columbus. Miss. 


4.00 


803 


Metropolis, 111. 


3.00 


275 


Newton. Mass. 


60.00 


2188 


Columbia. Miss. 


12.00 


839 


Des Plaines, 111. 


467.05 


327 


Attleboro, Mass. 


10.00 




MISSOURI 




1185 
1361 


Chicago, 111. 
Chester. 111. 


26.00 
20.00 


351 
400 


Northampton. Mass. 
Hudson, Mass. 


10.00 
20.00 


61 


Kansas City, Mo. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
St. Louis. Mo. 


10.00 


1367 
1883 


Chicago. 111. 
Macomb, 111. 


101.00 
70.00 


444 
540 


Pittsfield. Mass. 
Waltham. Mass. 


40.00 
108.00 


110 
602 


21.00 
87.00 


1889 


Downers Grove, 111. 


40.00 


549 


Greenfield, Mass. 


20.00 


1434 


Moberly, Mo. 


19.00 


1996 
1997 


Libertyville, 111. 
Columbia, 111. 


40.00 
20.00 


595 
624 


Lynn, Mass. 
Brockton, Mass. 


10.00 
10.00 


1596 
1792 


St. Louis. Mo. 
Sedalia, Mo. 


51.00 
21.00 


2010 
2063 


Anna, 111. 
Lacon. III. 


14.00 
60.00 


656 
680 


Holyoke. Mass. 
Newton, Mass. 


10.00 
10.00 


1795 
1987 


Farmington, Mo. 
St. Charles. Mo. 


34.00 
37.00 


2158 


Rock Island. 111. 


10.00 


685 


Chicopee. Mass. 


10.00 




MONTANA 






INDIANA 




693 


Needham. Mass. 


10.00 


88 


Anaconda, Mont. 


10.00 


60 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


30.00 


708 


West Newton, Mass. 


27.00 


286 


Great Falls, Mont. 


30.00 


90 


Evansville, Ind. 


10.00 


762 


Quincy, Mass. 


20.00 


557 


Bozeman, Mont. 


20.00 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. 


\o. City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No. City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No 


670 


Poison, Mont. 


20.00 


353 


New York, N.Y. 


115.00 


2305 


718 


Havre, Mont. 


10.00 


357 


Islip, N.Y. 


160.00 


2407 


911 


Kalispell, Mont. 


30.00 


366 


New York, N.Y. 


10.00 


2448 


1172 


Billings. Mont. 


10.00 


374 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


10.00 


2632 


2225 


Libby. Mont. 


10.00 


385 


New York. N.Y. 


168.00 


2669 


2581 


Libby. Mont. 


20.00 


412 


Sayville, N.Y. 


60.00 


2682 




NEBRASKA 




440 


Buffalo. N.Y. 


46.00 


2710 


1881 


Fremont, Nebr. 


5.00 


447 


Ossining, N.Y. 


80.00 


2765 








453 


Auburn. N.Y. 


10.00 


3108 




NEW HAMPSHIRE 




488 


New York. N.Y. 


30.00 


3115 


921 


Portsmouth. N.H. 


60.00 


493 


Mt. Vernon. N.Y. 


10.00 


3127 


1247 


Laconia. N.H. 


10.50 


502 


Canandiagua. N.Y. 


80.00 


3211 


2276 


Berlin. N.H. 


17.00 


503 


Lancaster. N.Y. 


42.00 






NEW JERSEY 




532 


Elmira. N.Y. 


10.00 










543 


Mamaroneck. N.Y. 


80.00 


1492 


15 


Hackensack, N.J. 


40.00 










23 


Dover, N.J. 


42.00 


574 


Middletown, N.Y. 


140.00 


2230 


121 


Vineland. N.J. 


85.00 


608 


New York. N.Y. 


40.00 




282 


Jersey City. N.J. 


17.00 


689 


Dunkirk, N.Y. 


10.00 




299 


Union City, N.J. 


20.00 


700 


Corning, N.Y. 


10.00 


1032 


325 


Paterson. N.J. 


42.00 


729 


Liberty. N.Y. 


27.00 




349 


Orange. N.J. 


40.00 


740 


New York, N.Y. 


45.00 




393 


Camden, N.J. 


310.00 


747 


Oswego, N.Y. 


20.00 


2 


432 


Atlantic City. N.J. 


42.00 


787 


New York, N.Y. 


119.00 


11 


455 


Somerville, N.J. 


60.00 


791 


New York, N.Y. 


20.00 


29 


490 


Passaic, N.J. 


90.00 










612 


Union Hill, N.J. 


6.00 


950 


New York, N.Y. 


20.00 


104 


620 


Madison. N.J. 


30.00 


956 


New York. N.Y. 


8.00 


105 


715 


Elizabeth, N.J. 


134.00 


964 


Rockland County, N.Y. 


10.00 


143 


781 


Princeton. N.J. 


10.00 


996 


Penn Yan. N.Y. 


10.00 


171 


821 


Springfield. N.J. 


45.00 


1016 


Rome. N.Y. 


10.00 


182 


1006 


New Brunswick, N.J. 


217.00 


1042 


Plattsburgh, N.Y. 


221.00 


200 


1269 


Trenton. N.J. 


40.00 


1093 


Glencove. N.Y. 


10.00 


224 


1489 


Burlington, N.J. 


240.00 


1135 


Port Jefferson, N.Y. 


70.00 


248 


2018 


Lakewood. N.J. 


121.00 


1151 


Batavia. N.Y. 


30.00 


254 


2212 


Newark, N.J. 


20.00 


1162 


College Point. N.Y. 


64.50 


356 


2250 


Red Bank, N.J. 


90.00 


1163 


Rochester. N.Y. 


20.00 


372 


2315 


Jersey City, N.J. 


20.00 


1164 


New York. N.Y. 


220.00 


404 




NEW MEXICO 




1167 


Smithtown Branch, N.Y 


100.00 


415 


1319 


Albuquerque, N. Mex. 


79.50 


1175 
1204 


Kingston. N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 


79.00 
130.00 


437 
639 


1962 


Las Cruces, N. Mex. 


20.00 
















1292 


Huntington. N.Y. 


214.00 


660 




NEW YORK 




1318 


Farmingdale. L.I.. N.Y. 


10.00 


703 


9 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


10.00 


1397 


North Hempstead, N.Y. 


20.00 


716 


12 


Syracuse, N.Y. 


189.00 


1456 


New York, N.Y. 


344.00 


854 


20 


New York. N.Y. 


20.00 


1483 


Patchoque. N.Y. 


67.00 


873 


53 


White Plains, N.Y. 


20.00 


1508 


Lyons, N.Y. 


20.00 


892 


72 


Rochester. N.Y. 


50.00 


1511 


Southampton, N.Y. 


10.00 


940 


77 


Port Chester. N.Y. 


10.00 


1536 


New York. N.Y. 


232.00 


976 


99 


Cohoes. N.Y. 


30.00 


1577 


Buffalo. N.Y. 


10.00 


1079 


117 


Albany. N.Y. 


346.00 


1649 


Woodhaven. N.Y. 


100.00 


1108 


125 


Utica. N.Y. 


10.00 


1656 


Onconta. N.Y. 


6.00 


1 1 1 1 


135 


New York. N.Y. 


245.00 


1657 


New York. N.Y. 


62.00 


1 1 38 


163 


Peekskill. N.Y. 


80.00 


1757 


Buffalo. N.Y. 


20.00 


1180 


187 


Geneva, N.Y. 


10.00 


1772 


Hicksville. N.Y. 


10.00 


1189 


188 


Yonkers. N.Y. 


60.00 


1837 


Babylon. N.Y. 


30.00 


1311 


203 


Poughkeepsie. N.Y. 


20.00 


1888 


New York. N.Y. 


160.00 


1365 


229 


Glens Falls, N.Y. 


40.00 


1921 


Hempstead. N.Y. 


30.00 


1393 


246 


New York. N.Y. 


705.50 


1973 


Riverhead. N.Y. 


20.00 


1426 


257 


New York, N.Y. 


46 1.00 


1978 


Buffalo. N.Y. 


10.00 


1438 


278 


Watertown. N.Y. 


1 0.00 


2031 


Brooklyn. N.Y. 


111 (1(1 


1454 


281 


Binghamton. N.Y. 


40.00 


2100 


Amityville, N.Y. 


20.00 


1477 


284 


New York. N.Y. 


10.00 


2117 


Flushing. N.Y. 


10.00 


1514 


289 


Lockport, N.Y. 


10.00 


2155 


New York, N.Y. 


10.00 


1 5 1 'i 


298 


New York. N.Y. 


170.00 


2161 


Catskill. N.Y. 


10.00 


1 602 


301 


Newburgh. N.Y. 


40.00 


2163 


New York, N.Y. 


50.00 


1750 


310 


Norwich. N.Y. 


10.00 


2236 


New York. N.Y. 


10.00 


1871 


322 


Niagara Falls, N.Y. 


10.00 


2241 


Brooklyn. N.Y. 


64.00 


1929 


323 


Beacon. N.Y. 


90.00 


22X7 


New York, N.Y. 


20.00 


1935 


350 


New Rochcllc, N.Y. 


50.00 


2295 


New York, N.Y. 


10.00 


2077 



City & State 
New York, N.Y. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Fleischmanns, N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
West Islip. L.I., N.Y. 
New York. N.Y. 
New York. N.Y. 
Nassau County. N.Y. 
New York. N.Y. 
Herkimer. N.Y. 
New York, N.Y. 
Herkimer, N.Y. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Hendersonville. N.C. 
Greensboro. N.C. 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Minot. N.D. 



Amount 

20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 
131.00 
20.00 
10.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 



20.00 
20.00 



OHIO 

Cincinnati. Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
Cincinnati. Ohio 
Dayton. Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Canton. Ohio 
Youngstown. Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
Columbus. Ohio 
Cincinnati. Ohio 
Toledo. Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
Marietta. Ohio 
Lima, Ohio 
Lake County. Ohio 
Cincinnati. Ohio 
Portsmouth. Ohio 
Akron. Ohio 
Springfield. Ohio 
Lockland. Ohio 
Zanesville. Ohio 
Madisonville. Ohio 
Cincinnati. Ohio 
Yougstown, Ohio 
Sandusky. Ohio 
Marion. Ohio 
Steubenville. Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
[ronton, Ohio 
Toledo. Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Columbiana County. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
I oledo, Ohio 
Elyria. Ohio 
Warren. Ohio 
Cincinnati. Ohio 
Middletown, Ohio 
Nilcs. Ohio 
[ronton, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
Barberton, Ohio 
Columbus. Ohio 



32.00 



10.00 
10.00 
40.00 
50.00 

205.00 
20.00 

140.00 
73.00 

305.00 
20.00 
30.00 
10.00 
20.00 
50.00 
80.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
30.00 
10.00 
30.00 
20.00 
10.00 
50.00 
30.00 
90.00 
1. 00 

10.00 

39.25 

Ohio 10.00 

10.00 

50.00 
30.00 
30.00 
142.00 
;n mi 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
72.37 
30.00 
80.00 
50.00 
10.00 
10.00 



JANUARY, 1969 



13 



L.U. No. City & State Amount 

2092 Canton, Ohio 86.00 

2159 Cleveland. Ohio 40.00 

2239 Port Clinton, Ohio 10.00 

2248 Piqua. Ohio 20.00 

2280 Mt. Vernon, Ohio 10.00 

2338 Wadsworth, Ohio 20.00 

2783 Columbus, Ohio 10.00 

OKLAHOMA 

329 Oklahoma City, Okla. 20.00 

653 Chickash, Okla. 16.00 

986 McAlester, Okla. 10.00 

1399 Okmulgee, Okla. 10.00 

1431 El Reno, Okla. 12.00 

1659 Bartlesville, Okla. 20.00 

OREGON 

2008 Ponco City. Okla. 40.00 

226 Portland, Ore. 92.00 

1020 Portland, Ore. 31.00 

1087 Harrisburg, Ore. 25.00 

1857 Portland, Ore. 50.00 

1961 Roseburg, Ore. 10.00 

2133 Albany. Ore. 40.00 

2181 Corvallis, Ore. 30.00 

2835 Independence. Ore. 12.00 

2908 Prineville, Ore. 12.00 

2942 Albany, Ore. 10.00 

2970 Pilot Rock, Ore. 20.00 

3009 Grants Pass, Ore. 25.00 

3182 Portland, Ore. 13.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

8 Philadelphia, Pa. 88.00 

81 Erie. Pa. 20.00 

122 Philadelphia, Pa. 185.00 

129 Hazleton, Pa. 33.00 

142 Pittsburgh, Pa. 30.00 

145 Towanda, Pa. 30.00 

165 Pittsburgh. Pa. 30.00 

191 York, Pa. 277.00 

206 Newcastle, Pa. 22.00 

207 Chester, Pa. 20.00 
211 Pittsburgh. Pa. 10.00 
228 Pottsville, Pa. 22.00 
239 Easton, Pa. 10.00 
261 Scranton, Pa. 30.00 
263 Bloomsburg, Pa. 10.00 
287 Harrisburg, Pa. 320.00 
333 New Kensington, Pa. 52.00 
359 Philadelphia, Pa. 50.00 
368 Allentown. Pa. 11.00 
401 Pittston. Pa. 20.00 
406 Bethlehem, Pa. 10.00 
414 Nanticoke, Pa. 7.00 
422 New Brighton, Pa. 90.00 
430 Wilkensburg, Pa. 304.00 
454 Philadelphia. Pa. 30.00 
462 Greensburg, Pa. 20.00 
465 Ardmore. Pa. 20.00 
492 Reading, Pa. 100.00 

500 Butler, Pa. 60.00 

501 Stroudsburg, Pa. 40.00 
514 Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 60.00 
541 Washington, Pa. 10.00 
571 Carnegie. Pa. 33.00 
691 Williamsport, Pa. 10.00 
773 Braddock, Pa. 20.00 
833 Berwyn, Pa. 10.00 
838 Sunbury, Pa. 43.00 
843 Jenkintown, Pa. 40.00 
845 Clifton Heights, Pa. 20.00 



L.U. No. 

900 

947 
1000 
1010 
1044 
1048 
1050 
1073 
1160 
1320 
1333 
1419 
1462 
1595 
1732 
1759 
1806 
1823 
1856 
19.06 
2235 
2264 
2274 
2329 
2590 
2850 



94 
176 
801 



537 



50 
259 
345 
1475 
2082 
2473 
2825 



14 

198 

213 

379 

411 

425 

526 

610 

622 

665 

724 

753 

973 

977 

1104 

1266 

1334 

1423 

1565 

1634 

1661 

1751 

1822 

1855 

1884 

1890 

1971 



City & State Amount 

Altoona, Pa. 10.00 

Ridgeway, Pa. 10.00 

Greenville, Pa. 21.00 

Uniontown, Pa. 19.00 

Charleroi. Pa. 20.00 

McKeesport. Pa. 10.00 

Philadelphia, Pa. 20.00 

Philadelphia. Pa. 30.00 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 20.00 

Somerset, Pa. 11.00 

State College. Pa. 20.00 

Johnstown," Pa. 30.00 

Bristol. Pa. 10.00 

Conshohocken, Pa. 123.00 

Ambridge. Pa. 10.00 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 70.00 

Dallastown. Pa. 45.00 

Philadelphia. Pa. 10.00 

Philadelphia. Pa. 40.00 

Philadelphia. Pa. 10.00 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 40.00 

Pittsburgh. Pa. 60.00 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 180.00 

Lock Haven, Pa. 10.00 

Kane, Pa. 5.75 

Philadelphia, Pa. 20.00 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence, R.I. 228.00 

Newport, R.I. 200.00 

Woonsocket, R.I. 16.50 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Aiken, S.C. 20.00 

TENNESSEE 

Knoxville, Tenn. 301.50 

Jackson, Tenn. 36.00 

Memphis. Tenn. 10.00 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 4.00 

Kingsport, Tenn. 20.00 

Bristol. Tenn. 40.00 

Nashville, Tenn. 32.00 

TEXAS 

San Antonio, Tex. 189.00 

Dallas, Tex. 30.00 

Houston, Tex. 110.00 

Texarkana, Tex. 30.00 

San Angelo. Tex. 26.00 

El Paso, Tex. 21.00 

Galveston, Tex. 10.00 

Port Arthur, Tex. 10.00 

Waco, Tex. 20.00 

Amarillo, Tex. 20.00 

Houston, Tex. 20.00 

Beaumont, Tex. 92.00 

Texas City, Tex. 30.00 

Wichita Falls, Tex. 10.00 

Tyler, Tex. 20.00 

Austin, Tex. 90.00 

Baytown. Tex. 70.00 
Corpus Christie, Tex. 20.00 

Abilene. Tex. 10.00 

Big Spring, Tex. 13.00 

Fort Arthur, Tex. 10.00 

Austin, Tex. 10.00 

Fort Worth, Tex. 50.00 

Bryan, Tex. 10.00 

Lubbock. Tex. 60.00 

Conroe, Tex. 10.00 

Temple, Tex. 70.00 



L.U. No. City & State 

2007 Orange, Tex. 
2232 Houston, Tex. 
3106 San Antonio, Tex. 



UTAH 

722 Salt Lake City, Utah 

1498 Provo, Utah 

VIRGINIA 

319 Roanoke, Va. 

388 Richmond, Va. 

1534 Petersburg, Va. 

1665 Alexandria. Va. 

WASHINGTON 

98 Spokane, Wash. 

131 Seattle. Wash. 

317 Aberdeen, Wash. 

338 Seattle, Wash. 

470 Tacoma, Wash. 

562 Everett, Wash. 

770 Yakima, Wash. 

954 Mt. Vernon, Wash. 

1289 Seattle. Wash. 

1303 Port Angeles, Wash. 

1332 Grand Coulee, Wash. 

1597 Bremerton, Wash. 

1699 Pasco, Wash. 

1707 Kelso Longview. Wash. 

1708 White River Valley, 
Wash. 

1715 Vancouver, Wash. 

1797 Renton. Wash. 

1849 Pasco. Wash. 

1974 Ellensburg, Wash. 

1982 Seattle, Wash. 

2127 Centralia. Wash. 

2205 Wenatchee, Wash. 

2396 Seattle. Wash. 

2403 Richland, Wash. 

2498 Longview. Wash. 

2536 Port Gamble, Wash. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

3 Wheeling. W. Va. 

435 Chester, W. Va. 

1159 Point Pleasant. W. Va. 

1574 Weirton. W. Va. 



Amount 

10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

3.00 
22.00 

42.25 

80.00 

40.00 

111.00 

10.00 
51.00 
10.00 
50.00 
30.00 
50.00 
71.00 
20.00 
20.00 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 
10.00 
31.00 

30.00 
40.00 
15.00 
10.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
30.00 
30.00 
80.00 
20.00 





WISCONSIN 


460 


Wausau, Wise. 


630 


Neenah and Menasha. 




Wise. 


820 


Wisconsin Rapids, Wis< 


1594 


Wausau, Wise. 


2246 


Fennimore, Wise. 


2334 


Baraboo, Wise. 


2958 


Marshfield, Wise. 


3049 


Merrill, Wise. 



659 



WYOMING 

Rawlins, Wyo. 



16.50 
10.00 
20.00 
10.00 



1.00 

21.00 
10.00 
20.00 
20.00 
27.50 
15.00 
10.00 

11.00 



Included in the amounts listed above 
are $10 contributions from delegates rep- 
resenting their local unions at the state 
council conventions. In some instances 
these $10 contributions at the conven- 
tions were the only monies received from 
the local unions. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



I * pjanadian Report 



Anti-Rand Report 
Drive Is Launched 

The Ontario Federation of Labor 
is initiating an educational and in- 
formational campaign to try to head 
off any adverse labor legislation aris- 
ing from the Rand Report on indus- 
trial relations to the Ontario govern- 
ment. 

In his report former Justice Ivan 
Rand recommended the establish- 
ment of an all-powerful Tribunal 
which would in effect be a court of 
last resort governing labor-manage- 
ment relations in the province. There 
would be no appeal from its rulings, 
and one of the things which it could 
invoke would be compulsory arbi- 
tration. 

Compulsory arbitration is just one 
of the things which trade unions 
don't like in Rand. But what could 
decide what the Ontario government 
would accept from the Rand report 
and what it would reject is public 
opinion. This is why the OFL in- 
tends to embark on a campaign 
which would have as its objective 
the influencing of public opinion by 
trying to overcome many of the 
myths which have over a long period 
of time developed about unions, their 
objectives, methods, leadership, fi- 
nancing and their use of the strike 
weapon. 

The campaign will also be direct- 
ed at trade union membership. There 
is reason to believe that many card- 
holding trade unionists need infor- 
mation about the labor movement 
juwt as much as the general public. 
Sometimes they and their families 
have the same attitude towards un- 
ions as the general public — some- 
thing like, unions are necessary, but 
in a way a "necessary evil" rather 
than a positive good. 

So one line of approach in the 
campaign will be toward informing 
the trade union membership — inter- 
nal education. The other line will be 
toward the public using to the ex- 
tent that it is financially possible, the 
daily press through news stories, let- 
ters and newspaper advertisement, 
the radio and TV media. 



Taxation Is Issue 

For Citizenship Month 

Every February in CITIZENSHIP 
MONTH — proclaimed by the Ca- 
nadian Labor Congress with the ex- 
press view of involving the trade un- 
ion movement in one important 
issue of the day to get its point-of- 
view across. 

This year the subject will be TAX- 
ATION. 

The CLC is using the Carter Re- 
port to the federal government as its 
basis for influencing public opinion 
and the government in the direction 
of overhauling Canada's system of 
taxation. The Carter Commission 
told the government a year ago that 
Canada's taxation system bears too 
heavily on the lower income groups 
and that only major changes could 
overcome the inequities of the sys- 
tem. 

The CLC through its political ed- 
ucation department is using a post- 
card campaign to get its message 
across. 

The postcard, which can be mailed 
free of charge to the Minister of Fi- 
nance Hon. E. J. Benson, quotes 
from the Carter Report as follows: 

"The present system does not af- 
ford fair treatment for all Canadi- 
ans . . . 

"Under present tax system low 
income families pay a surprisingly 
high proportion of their income in 
taxes to all levels of government." 

It then asks the sender to endorse 
the campaign, "I support early ac- 
tion in revising the whole Canadian 
system of taxation as proposed by 
the Carter Report," to sign the card 
and put it in the mailbox. 

BC Labor Bills 

Meet Heavy Weather 

The new labor legislation adopted 
in British Columbia has run into 
heavy weather. The B.C. government 
put into effect Bill 33 which set up 
a three-man mediation board effec- 
tive December 1, 1968. On the board 
were a judge as chairman, one man- 
agement representative and one la- 
bor representative. 



The B.C. Federation of Labor 
convention adopted a policy state- 
ment which put the trade union 
movement in that province on record 
as opposing the board in every way, 
including refusal to co-operate with 
it. 

The chairman of the new board 
and the management representative 
resigned. 

That was the situation at year's 
end. It will be interesting to see 
where the B.C. government will go 
from there. 

Minister of Labor 
Has Union Background 

The federal Minister of Labor 
Bryce Mackasey is a former trade 
unionist which makes him excep- 
tional. It is very seldom that anyone 
with trade union background gets 
appointed to a key cabinet post, 
either federally or provincially. 

Mr. Makasey is quite outspoken 
in his views. He has stated his sup- 
port for the Freedman Report which 
urges that workers should be pro- 
tected from adverse effects of tech- 
nological changes, that unions should 
be consulted when such changes are 
planned, and that unions should have 
the right to strike during the con- 
tract period if necessary to win pro- 
tection. 

This is in striking contrast to the 
former minister of labor who was 
a corporation lawyer. 

The Woods Report on labor leg- 
islation was to be put before parlia- 
ment early in January. Its recom- 
mendations regarding technological 
changes will have some bearing on 
what legislation, if any, is produced. 
But the present minister of labor 
says he is committed to the Freed- 
man Report. 

'Student Power' and 
The Labor Movement 

"Student power" is getting a great 
deal of attention these days. It has 
evoked all kinds of opinions, pro and 
con. In any case young people are 
very much bolder in expressing their 
views these days than they used to 



JANUARY, 1969 



15 



be. Probably they are better in- 
formed than were young people of 
years ago — better education, better 
communications and so on. 

In Ontario "student power" help- 
ed out on a picket line. 

The Thomson newspaper chain 
took over the Peterborough Exam- 
iner last year. The employees in the 
editorial department, 22 of them, 
joined the Newspaper Guild, made 
their contractual demands — and got 
turned down cold. 

The newspapermen had problems 
manning the picket lines regularly. 
Here's where students stepped in. 

Together with local clergymen and 
citizens, they came from a number 
of universities — over 200 of them 
at one time — and backed up the 
pickets very solidly. A number were 
arrested, but the violations were rela- 
tively minor. 

In any case the Newspaper Guild 
gives them credit for helping to at- 
tract nationwide attention to a strike 
situation which was at first getting 
no attention. Apart from owning the 
local newspaper, the Thomson in- 
terests — Lord Thomson of Fleet — 
also owns the local radio and TV 
stations. 

Housing Report 
Early This Year 

An important report on housing 
will be presented to the House of 
Commons early in the new year. 

The Minister of Transport in 
charge of housing, Paul Hellyer, has 
been traveling across Canada with 
a task force sounding out public as 
well as expert opinion. 

He got a lot of advice, but what 
he will do with it will be interesting 
to discover when he makes his re- 
port. All he has indicated so far is 
the need to cut out a lot of red tape. 

It is expected that about 185,000 
new dwellings will have been built 
in 1968. This compares with the 
minimum of 200,000 needed per 
year, according to the Economic 
Council of Canada. 

What Mr. Hellyer will have to 
solve is the problem not only of 
building enough housing, but build- 
ing homes at prices people can af- 
ford. What will he do about high 
land costs and high money costs? 




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16 



THE CARPENTER 




Discussing objectives of (be new JAC are (left to right): H. Page Groton, Inter- 
national Representative, Boilermakers-Blacksmiths; C. J. Haggerty, President, Building 
and Construction Trades Department; B. A. Gritta, President, Metal Trades Depart- 
ment; Finlay C. Allan, First General Vice President, Carpenters; and Marcus Loftis, 
International Representative, Electrical Workers. 




SHAPE 

AMERICA'S 

I FUTURE-J 



Building Trades Unions Join 

Metal Trades Unions 

In Joint Apprenticeship Effort 



■ A new group has been orga- 
nized to act as a unified spokesman 
for the apprenticeship activities of 
a major segment of the organized 
labor movement. The new Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee is a com- 
bined effort of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department 
and the Metal Trades Department 
of the AFL-CIO. 

Organizational plans were formu- 
lated November 14 in Washington, 
D.C, at a special meeting attended 
by approximately 25 officers of af- 
filiated unions, apprenticeship lead- 
ers and department officers. 

The Joint Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee grew out of a recommenda- 
tion made by the Metal Trades' 
Apprenticeship Committee to De- 
partment President B. A. Gritta. 
The motion urged that the Metal 
Trades and the Building Trades de- 
partments unite their efforts to fur- 
ther advance their common goals in 
the apprenticeship movement. 



President of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department, 
C J. Haggerty, agreed with the 
Metal Trades suggestion, and a 
meeting was set to formulate plans 
for the organization. 

Opening the first meeting was 
Metal Trades President Gritta, who 
commented that the new committee 
"would be in a unique position to 
discuss labor's apprenticeship prob- 
lems and arrive at answers to assist 
the Bureau of Apprenticeship of the 
Department of Labor." 

President of the Building and 
Construction Trades Department, C 
J. Haggerty, also addressed the 
group. He noted that: "The time is 
appropriate for the formation of 
JAC" He promised that the com- 
mittee "will have the full support 
of all segments of the organized 
labor movement." 

"Purpose of the committee." ac- 
cording to its newly-appointed chair- 
man, David S. Turner, "is to bring 



together all trades to discuss — and 
hopefully solve — problems common 
to our separate apprenticeship pro- 
grams. We will bring these problems 
and our recommendations for solu- 
tions to the attention of the Presi- 
dent of the Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department, who will 
in turn relay our actions to the var- 
ious international unions." Turner 
is General Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Sheet Metal Workers International 
Association. He served as chairman 
of the Metal Trades Department Ap- 
prenticeship Committee, now merged 
into the joint committee. 

Marcus Loftis was elected Vice 
Chairman of JAC by acclamation. 
Loftis is Assistant to the President 
of the International Brotherhood 
of Electrical Workers and is respon- 
sible for apprenticeship training in 
the IBEW. 

The group also unanimously elect- 
ed Paul Hutchings as JAC Secretary. 
Hutchings is Research and Training 
Director of the Metal Trades De- 
partment. He has been active in the 
Metal Trades' Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee for the past 10 years, serving 
as its secretary. 

Chairman Turner reminded com- 
mittee members that JAC would 
face many problems in coming 
months, and its activities would be 
directed in several directions. He 
expressed his belief that the com- 
mittee would serve a valuable pur- 
pose in bringing about better com- 
munications among the various seg- 
ments and departments of the labor 
movement. 

Turner also noted the committee's 
important function in presenting 
a unified stand on behalf of the 
labor movement to the new federal 
Administration, as well as serving 
as a "watchdog" committee in re- 
lating back to unions problems fac- 
ing the construction and metal trades 
industries. The many recent changes 
surrounding the jurisdiction of the 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and Train- 
ing (BAT) makes the work of JAC 
doubly important at this time. Turn- 
er said. 

On the matter of BAT. the com- 
mittee heard from its director. Hugh 
Murphy, who extended to the group 
the best wishes of his department. 
He further expressed the desire of 
Continued on page 20 



JANUARY, 1969 



17 





EDITORIALS 



* The Learning Force 

"We have become an educational society," Health, 
Education and Welfare Secretary Wilbur J. Cohen 
stated in Washington rec&ntly. "The learning force 
already exceeds the labor force. While there are about 
80 million persons in the U.S. labor force, there are 
some 100 million Americans engaged in some type of 
organized learning activity." 

With such a heavy ratio of karners to earners, is 
it any wonder that school systems in many parts of 
the nation are facing financial problems? 

"The property tax is no longer a sufficient source 
of revenue for the schools," Cohen comments. "It 
must be modified, supplemented by other sources of 
revenue or eventually eliminated." 

Cohen calls for greater Federal appropriations to 
the schools — a suggestion which will probably not find 
favorable response in the incoming Nixon Admin- 
istration. 

Nevertheless, Cohen's call for other sources of 
school revenue merits the attention of every local, 
county and state official. With more and more people 
nocking to our cities and moving into high-rise and 
other concentrated housing developments, the property 
owner becomes a minority. Property tax returns are 
dropping so drastically in some areas that basic public 
facilities and services are withering away. 

Other sources of school revenue must be found. 

* The Promises of Peace 

The drums of war beat their tattoo so steadily into 
our consciousness that we sometimes lose sight of 
what the world might be like, if all cold and hot-war 
hostilities cease. 

Two recent news reports offer a glimmer of promise 
for "the new day." They are as follows: 

• In 1967 floods ruined most of the rice crop in a 
Vietnamese valley 75 miles from Saigon. As a relief 
measure, the United States flew in from the Philip- 
pines seeds from a new breed of rice called IR-8. 
This new breed of rice — developed under Ford and 
Rockefeller Foundation grants from 10,000 rice seed 
samples from around the world — was planted, and 
Vietnamese farmers proceeded to set new records for 
rice yields in Vietnam. 

Last October, South Vietnam's Ambassador pre- 



sented two bags of IR-8 harvested in his country to 
the United States as a symbolic thank-you gift. The 
gesture recalled a similar gift from the President of the 
Philippines to the Shah of Iran. A simple bag of IR-8, 
experts agree, can do more for Iran than many chests 
of jewels. 

With millions starving around the world, here is 
hope in the midst of war. 

• Example Two has to do with a man-made satel- 
lite — considered by many to be warlike spies in the sky. 

Two Mexican cities were recently saved from pos- 
sible disastrous flooding in the wake of Hurricane 
Naomi when a weather satellite's photographs indi- 
cated the rains would cease. Mexican authorities were 
faced with a decision to keep a dam closed and risk 
further rains which might sweep the dam aside and 
inundate the cities, or open the dam and flood one 
of the cities. The satellite pictures took the guesswork 
out of the matter. 

What promise this cold-war creation holds for 
weather forecasting and search-and-rescue operations, 
once peace is achieved! 

* The Yellow Dog Returns 

East Tennessee Labor News dug up a fossil from 
organized labor's past, a few weeks ago. At least, we 
all thought it was a thing of the past. 

What the labor newspaper found was a yellow-dog 
contract, in use by a large general store at Oak Ridge, 
Tennessee. Such contracts have been banned since 
1932 by the Norris-LaGuardia Act and are consid- 
ered an unfair labor practice since passage of the 
National Labor Relations Act in 1935. 

For those of us who don't go back a generation or 
more, a yellow-dog contract is an oral or written 
agreement whereby an employee pledges not to be- 
come nor to remain a union member, under penalty 
of discharge. Such agreements were used a few dec- 
ades ago in an effort to break unions, and they almost 
succeeded in some cases. 

We don't expect this fossil in East Tennessee to sur- 
vive 1969 exposure, but we thought we'd report the 
"find" to you as a reminder that labor's liberties today 
are hard-won and that vicious practices of the past 
can still come back to threaten us, unless we are 
vigilant. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 





What' s New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Seventeen of Boston's finest, Robert 
Holland, Local 40, George Moore, Local 
67; Thomas Fitzgerald, Local 40; Sal- 
vatore Vasta, Local 40; Robert Sacco. 
Local 218; Weldon Gregory. Local 67; 
Jeffrey Please, Local 40; Edward Pitcher, 
Local 218; Richard Chase, Local 40; 
Richard Griffith, Local 40; Stephen 
Mohan, Local 40; James Russell, Local 
67; Robert Alderman, Local 67; Robert 
Labbe, Local 51; Joseph Censullo, Local 
33; Robert Columbare, Local 40; and 
Paul Smith, Local 67. Not pictured are 
Arthur Burnham and Daniel Morrison, 
both of Local 33. 




The 1968 graduating class of the Fox River Valley Carpenters' Apprenticeship 
program are shown with union business representatives serving the area. First row, 
from the left are: Pat Lathrop, Elgin; Bruce Clark, Elmhurst; Ed Oakley, Carpenters- 
ville; Harold Hallin, St. Charles; Dennis Eliason, Carpentersville; and Doug Albrecht, 
Wonder Lake. Standing: Robert Knoll, Woodstock; Jim Sweeney, Aurora; Larry 
Lakeman, Business Representative for Local 916, Aurora; Paul K. Bolger, President 
of the Fox River Valley District Council of Carpenters and Business Representative 
for Local 363, Elgin; Carl Kriegel, Business Representative for Local 2087, Crystal 
Lake; Dan Ziller, Huntley; Dick Genz, Elgin; and John Rehberg, Crystal Lake. 
Also graduating were Bob Blalock, Crystal Lake and Charles Johnson, Hebron. 
Andrew Olsson, Business Representative for Local 1248 Geneva, was not present. 



Graduates in Fox River Valley, Illinois 



Thirteen men joined the ranks of jour- 
neymen carpenters in the Fox River Val- 
ley as they completed their four year 
apprenticeship training. 

The men come from Elgin, Aurora, 
Crystal Lake. Carpentersville. Woodstock, 
Elmhurst. St. Charles. Huntley, Hebron 
and Wonder Lake. All were enrolled in 
the Fox Valley Apprenticeship Training 
Program. 

Harold Hallin, one of the graduates, 



recently won the Carpenters' Apprentice- 
ship contest for the State of Illinois. 

Graduates were honored at a dinner 
and received diplomas and steel squares 
in recognition of their accomplishments. 
Attending the dinner were representatives 
of the Joint Apprenticeship Committee, 
the Illinois Department of Labor, In- 
structors of the apprenticeship program, 
and union officials. 



First Graduation 
Ceremony in Boston 

The Boston Carpenters Apprenticeship 
and Training Program held it's first grad- 
uation ceremony at Valle's Steak House 
recently, and 19 apprentice carpenters 
joined the ranks of journeyman carpen- 
ters. 

This select group of young men have 
more than proved themselves over the 
past four years. Their constant quest for 
learning has produced many graduates of 
Wentworth Institute, an engineering 
school in Boston. One exceptionally- 
talented student. Paul Smith, Local No. 
67, has received his Boston Builders 
License. 

Each member of the 1968 class was 
presented an intricate but useful gift and 
instructions on how to use it. 




Supervisor of Apprentice Training in 
Boston John Greenland, congratulates 
James Russell of Local L'nion No. 67. 



JANUARY, 1969 



19 




GOLDBLATT CATALOG 

OVER 1238 TOOLS 
THAT BUILDERS USE! 



CATALOG 
TODAY 



GOLDBLATT TOOL COMPANY 

521A Osage , Kansas City, Kansas 66110 

1 would like more information. 
' Name 



Address_ 
City 



_State_ 



-*P- 



Ful! Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EN- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is % 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease % inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is M inch and they increase 
%" each time until they cover a 50 
foot building. 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230,400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 48'-9 1 4," wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons, Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE. 
Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights. 



U.S.A. Send $2.50. If C.O.D. pay Post 
Office $3.35. Calif. 5% tax. Send $2.63. 
C.O.D. pay Post Office $3.48. Canadians 
buy only from a Canadian book store. Ask 
us for their address. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 



26 Apprentices Finish Studies 

In Memphis, Tennessee, Ceremony 




A total of 26 apprentices recently completed their training under the Memphis, 
Tennessee, Carpenters Apprentice Training Fund, and certificates were presented in 
brief ceremonies. 

Shown above are 14 of the new journeymen. They are as follows: 

Seated: Dennis Larry Nichols, Larry Daniel Tucker, William V. Hood (coordinator), 
Talford W. Ogelsby (instructor). Second row: Cleavern Cox, Michael Richard Daniel- 
son, Johnny L. Edmonds, Charles H. Yoon, Freddie Joe Osborn, James Leon Cook, 
Troy J. Tucker. Third row: George Harold Pierce, William T. Cox, Jr., Donald 
Calvin Smith, Johnny Anderson Wilson, Willie E. Fortner. 

Those unable to attend the ceremony included: Robert Norman Bomar, Travis N. 
Burlison, William T. Ferrell, William Delmar George, Thomas Goodwin Hall, Larry 
Noel Harr, Jerry Lee Moore, James Allen Morton, Thomas Alfred Porteous, Johnny 
W. Schales, Elbert F. Starnes, and Billy Gene Young. 

Graduating Apprentices in Arizona 




*\ 




An apprenticeship completion ceremony was held in Yuma, Arizona, on November 
14 for four completing Apprentices. Participants included, from left: Bob Barrett, 
Secretary, Central Arizona District Council of Carpenters; J. H. Howell; Kenneth 
Endsley; Richard J. Rhodes; and Bill Pridgen, Business Agent and Apprentice Coordi- 
nator, Local 1153. Thomas W. Johnson is not pictured, but was eligible for certificate. 



Joint Apprentice Effort 

(Continued from page 17) 
his staff to work amicably with the 
committee to pursue the mutual aims 
and objectives of a strong appren- 
ticeship program. 

The Joint Apprenticeship Com- 
mittee also moved to act on sub- 



committee appointments at the next 
quarterly meeting. J AC will have 
subcommittees operating in the areas 
of legislation, vocational education, 
Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training, and matters dealing with 
the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




Send In Your 
Avenue, N.W. 



Favorites! M 
Washington, 



iil To: Plane Gossip, 
D. C. 20001. SORRY, 



101 Constitution 
NO PAYMENT. 




Matrimonial Countdown 

A much-married elderly matron 
was asked why she had picked her 
husbands: a banker, an actor, a min- 
ister and an undertaker. Her answer: 
"Simple. It was a case of one for the 
money, two for the show, three to 
make ready . . . and four to go!" 

RESOLVE TO ATTEND UNION MEETINGS 







Much Better Music! 

Howie reports he went to a New 
Year's Eve celebration at a rock 'n 
roll joint. He said it was so noisy that, 
when a waitress dropped a tray of 
dishes, everybody jumped up and 
started to dance! 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Gof the Brush-off! 

A woman, having an upstairs room 
painted, thought the painter was 
making slow progress. She couldn't 
hear a sound. "Painter," she called, 
"are you working?" "Yes, ma'am," 
came the reply. "I can't hear you," 
the woman said. "Lady," the painter 
called down, "I'm not putting it on 
with a hammer!" 

— F. S. Millham, 
Fullerton, Pa. 

BE UNION— BUY I.ABEL 

Quite A Bargain 

The man-crazy secretary saw a sign 
at the movie cashier's booth which 
said: "Servicemen, 6O5!.' ' Yup, you 
guessed it: she said she'd like one! 



Mr. Pert Sez: 

They're gonna have a big dance in 
Washington, D.C., on January 20. 
They call it the "Inaugural Ball", on 
account of it's the wind-up of a lotta 



yarn! 



UNITED WE STAND 



Sounding Off 

The two old ladies were boarding 
a jet for their first air trip. One of 
them called the stewardess over and 
said: "Please ask the captain not to 
go faster than the speed of sound . . 
Martha and I want to talk." 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

Wanna Buy A Hot Trout? 

A state biologist was lecturing to 
a class about the state's fishery pro- 
gram. He demonstrated how fish 
were tagged, then asked if any stu- 
dent could give reasons why they 
tagged fish. After a brief silence, one 
lad raised his hand and asked: "To 
keep them from being stolen?" 

UNION DUES BUY RAISES 

Not-So-Daffynitions 

Confusion — One woman plus one 
left turn. 

Excitement — Two women plus one 
secret. 

Bedlam — Three women plus one 
bargain. 

Chaos — Four women plus one 
luncheon check. 



This Month's Limerick 

A young bull decided to stray 
From his pen one warm sunny day. 
When at last he was found, 
He was clear out of town, 
Which certainly constitutes prima 
facie evidence to substantiate the 
allegation that a little bull can go a 
long, long way! 

— Kathryn McGaughey, 
Wheatridge, Colo. 



Classroom Humor 

After half an hour of searching 
through the card catalog, a sixth- 
grader approached the librarian and 
requested a book entitled, "Advice 
for Young Mothers." With a note of 
surprise in her voice, the librarian 
asked the boy why he was interested 
in- that particular book. "It's about 
my hobby," he replied. "I collect 
moths." 

UNION-MADE IS WELL MADE 




Juice What the Dr. Ordered! 

A recent public opinion survey has 
revealed that, while canned and 
frozen juices are becoming increas- 
ingly popular, most men still prefer to 
squeeze their own tomatoes! 

BE SHARP — WORK SAFELY 

Time to Switch 

A girl had been away at school for 
a short time when her mother got the 
following letter: "I need $75 for 
new clothes. I've had six dates with 
the same fellow, and I've worn all 
the dresses I brought with me. Have 
date next weekend and must have 
a new dress." 

The mother's reply was to the 
point: "Get a new boy friend and 
start over." 



JANUARY, 1969 



21 







By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



Downed Buck 




Recent letter and pic calls attention 
to avid hunter. Elwin Risley, member of 
Local 125. Utica. NY. He nailed the 
biggest buck of his life the hard way — 
via the bow and arrow route. Here's a pic 
of Brother Risley with his prize, a 16- 
pointer that dressed out at 185 lbs. 

■ Then There Were None 

Letter and pic (unfortunately too faint 
for reproduction) from Milo L. Curts of 
Bloomington, Indiana, a member of Lo- 
cal 1664, offers advice on off-season hunt 
activity. 

"When the regular hunt seasons are 
closed, I keep old Betsy going by shoot- 
ing crows in winter roosts at night. Trail 
the birds in about sunset. Then when it 
gets dark (star light, no moon) creep up 
under the trees and let them have it." 

■ Low-Priced Lure 

Oscar Saltzman of 3547 Humboldt 
Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn., a member 
of Local 7, recalls the good old days 
when you could buy a daredevil lure for 
190 and catch a limit of pike and pickerel 
with it — no sweat. 

■ Chuck Recipe 

Sometime ago we received a request 
for a recipe for barbecued chuck. Digging 
down in our membership recipe file, we 
noted the following from Bill Marsac of 



Las Vegas, Nevada, a member of Local 
1780: 

Secure 4-lb. boneless chuck and place 
in leak-proof container made from heavy 
foil. Pour one cup of cooking wine over 
it, add a clove of minced garlic, and 
splash two tablespoons of ketchup over 
all. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Doubly wrap in foil and secure firmly. 
Place over charcoal fire and cook about 
25 minutes on one side, then reverse and 
cook another 25 minutes on other side. 
Cut corner of foil and pour into small 
pan. Slice and serve with either instant 
mashed or baked potatoes and Au Jus. 
It's inexpensive and delicious and serves 
six people. 

■ Big Moose Bagged 




One of the biggest moose we've heard 
tell about in many a moon can be 
credited to Joseph C. Brisette, vice presi- 
dent of Local 43, Hartford. We're in- 
debted for information and pic on kill 
from daughter Mariella. 

Here's photo of Brother Brisette with 
prize antler which featured a spread of 
61 inches. We hear he missed Boone and 
Crockett rating by only %th of a point 
and that the monster dressed out over 700 
pounds of locker meat. 

■ Minnesota Buck 

A report from one of our midwest 
column correspondents, J. S. Gostonczik 



of 104 High St., Spooner, Wisconsin 
records the downing of the largest buck 
ever shot in southern Minnesota, a 
moose-like 12 pointer by John F. Miller. 
Scene of the kill was in the river bottom 
land near Belle Plaine. Minnesota. Miller 
nailed it with Model 97 Winchester, 32- 
inch barrel. It dressed out at 327 pounds! 
Anyone got a large buck to report? 

■ 18-Pound Catfish 

Chalk up a tub-size catfish for David 
Tally of 22 Olive St., Leavenworth, 
Kansas, a member of Local 1635. Ac- 
cording to note from Mrs. Tally, Dave 
caught an 18 pounder from Wyandotte 
Lake, duped on fairly light gear topped 
off with B-Jay catfish bait. 



The Florida Lure 



Si Si 




Before those bone-chilling winter winds 
start ripping around the old homestead, 
Charles J. Hofreiter of 703 Nebraska, 
Peoria, 111., starts chasing the sun and 
for the last four winters has found it in 
Clearwater, Florida. When he gets there, 
he gets out his tackle box and rods and 
heads for the Causeway, located between 
the town of Clearwater and Clearwater 
Beach. Below, from those fish-lush waters, 
he sunk a hook in many a finned beauty. 
Here's a pic of one of his most recent 
catches — as nice a stringer of Sheepshead 
(convict fish) as we've seen in many a 
day. Average weight was five pounds. 

■ Captured 'Gator 

Jim Doss Jr. of 
2314 S. Norfolk 
St., San Mateo, 
California, a mem- 
ber of Local 162, 
has some treasur- 
able memories of 
outdoor excursions 
with his dad, now 
deceased, Jim Doss, 
Sr., also a Carpen- 
ter. The following 
pic records one in 
particular that took 
place back in Bran- 
don, Florida. Holding a four-foot 'gator is 




22 



THE CARPENTER 



Jim Sr. The alligator was called to their 
attention by their dog. foraging in a 
nearby swamp. The 'gator was captured 
by placing a long, forked stick over its 
neck. After the dog was taken away, the 
'gator was later released unharmed. 



New Teeth 
For Old Saws 



By JANE GOODSELL 

Press Associates, Inc. 

Mrs. Goodsell, who prepares a syndi 
cated column called "Soup to Nonsense," 
recently tried her skill at turning old 
proverbs into bureaucratic gobblygook. 
Here are Iter creations. See if you can 
figure out the original proverbs. 

Stone walls do not a correctional 
and rehabilitational institution make. 

4 * $ 

All's well that is finalized effectively. 

The restructuring of a sow's ear into 
a silk purse is incompatible with cur- 
rent developmental flexibility. 

It's interpersonal relationships based 
upon emotional involvement that make 
the world go 'round. 

All programmed activity and non- 
utilization of recreational outlets make 
Jack a less than fully-realized person- 
ality. 

Do not attempt statistical estimates 
of your chickens before it is feasible 
to correlate volume variances with pro- 
jected expectations. 

Daisy, Daisy, give me a verbalized 
evaluation of your positive or nega- 
tive reaction to the previously phrased 
inquiry. I am in a semi-rational condi- 
tion due to unfulfilled libidinal drives. 



Become a senior citizen along with 
me, The best is yet to be . . . 

Be it a minimal dwelling in a de- 
pressed socio-economic area, there is 
no place like home. 

Conceptualize your objectives before 
you leap. 

The utilization of a superfluity of 
culinary personnel maximizes disorga- 
nization and has a deleterious effect 
upon the broth. 

As economically disadvantaged as a 

churchmouse . . . 



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23 



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24 



FROM A LABOR VIEWPOINT: 
THE NEW NIXON CABINET 

Following are capsule profiles of members named by 
President-elect Nixon for his cabinet — seen from the 
labor viewpoint: 

Secretary of State — William P. Rogers, 55: Close 
personal friend of Nixon . . . limited experience in in- 
ternational field except as international corporate lawyer 
. . . possibly most competent man in Eisenhower cabinet 
as Attorney General . . . 

Secretary of Defense— Melvin R. Laird, 46: Hide- 
bound conservative as member of Congress from Wis- 
consin . . . COPE voting record lists him with 78 
"wrong" votes and five "right" . . . considered Hawk on 
Viet Nam but committed to settlement of conflict . . . 

Secretary of Labor — George P. Shultz, 48: Gener- 
ally considered a good appointment by union leaders . . . 
head of Graduate School of Business at University of 
Chicago . . . expert in effect of automation and techno- 
logical change on jobs . . . does not like government 
intervention in labor disputes ... 

Secretary of Treasury — David M. Kennedy, 62: 
Chairman of the board of Chicago's largest bank, Con- 
tinental Illinois Bank and Trust Co. . . . Calls himself 
a conservative but believes business must develop a 
social conscience . . . Orthodox banker and financier . . . 

Attorney General — John N. Mitchell, 55: Nixon's 
law partner and campaign manager . . . Wealthy Wall 
Street lawyer, expert on municipal financing . . . bears 
watching on law, order and justice issue . . . 

Secretary of Health, Education & Welfare — Robert 
H. Finch, 43: Closest personal associate of Nixon since 
Vice President's days in House . . . Present Lt. Gov. 
of California. Is conservative but not as right wing as 
Governor Reagan . . . Will be a power in the Admin- 
istration. . . . 

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development — 
George W. Romney, 61: Michigan governor, elected 
over union opposition . . . Moderate conservative but 
believes in restrictive labor legislation . . . was million- 
aire president of American Motors . . . 

Secretary of Transportation — John A. Volpe, 59: 
Rose from construction worker to millionaire contrac- 
tor .. . Massachusetts governor . . . One of most pop- 
ular New England Republicans. . . . Holds card in Plas- 
terers Union. . . . 

Secretary of Interior — Walter J. Hickel, 49: Alaskan 
governor . . . avoided sides in public versus private 
power fights . . . GOP moderate but unknown factor . . . 

Secretary of Agriculture — Dr. Clifford M. Hardin, 
53: Chancellor of University of Nebraska last 14 years 
. . . Academic background but served as farm economist 
under Eisenhower . . . Conservative. . . . 

Secretary of Commerce — Maurice H Stans, 60: Di- 
rector of Budget under Eisenhower . . . Extremely con- 
servative with little social outlook . . . Could be anti- 
labor . . . big interest: balancing the budget. . . . 

Postmaster General — Winton M. Blount, 47: Wealthy 
Alabama Republican contractor who did oppose George 
Wallace . . . President U. S. Chamber of Commerce . . . 
Has negotiated with unions in construction but may 
be tough with Federal employees . . . 

THE CARPENTER 



Craftsman Awards 

in the 

Nation's Capital 




Mark Baumgarten of Local 1694 and 
an employe of Lank Woodwork Co. Inc., 
Washington, D.C., center, was recognized 
for "skill and high quality of workman- 
ship shown in machine work for walnut 
bookcases and mouldings, and walnut 
room doors" at the International Printing 
Pressmen Union Offices in the nation's 
capital. 




From the day of its opening, almost no architectural praise has been given to the 
Cannon House Office Building on Capitol Hill. However, the work of two union 
carpenters who installed 550 wood radiator covers was recently singled out for praise 
by the Washington Building Congress, District of Columbia management organization. 
Of the work of Luigi Flaim, Local 1694, and Glyndon Sawyers, the Congress said, 
"High quality shop work and the field installation required difficult job of scribing to 
existing conditions. With the magnitude of the job, the consistent high quality of the 
workmanship is a tribute to the skill of the craftsmen." Sawyers and Flaim are shown 
at center receiving awards. 



Brotherhood and State Federation 
Leaders at Illinois State Meeting 




Delegates to the fall meeting of the Illinois State Council of Carpenters at Cham- 
paign heard from several state and national leaders, including those shown above. 
They included, from left, Duff Corbin, president of the state council; William Sidell, 
Second General Vice President of the United Brotherhood; Ruben Soderstrom, presi- 
dent of the Illinois State Federation of Labor; John Pruitt, vice president of the state 
council; and Jack Zeilenga, secretary-treasurer of the council. 



SORRY ABOUT THAT 

Our readers often write to us 
for unmarred copies of our front 
covers, complaining about the mail- 
ing label which appears at the 
lower left hand corner. 

We are sorry to report that, 
after careful investigation, we must 
continue to place our mailing tapes 
in the lower left corner of our 
front cover . . . for these reasons: 

• We usually carry advertise- 
ments on our back cover, and we 
cannot cover up the advertiser's 
message. 

• If we placed the mailing label 
at the fop of the front cover, we 
might obliterate the title of the 
publication. 

• The lower left hand spot is 
best because in this position it 
backs up the coupon inside our 
front cover which is used for 
changes of address. With your 
mailing label already attached to 
the coupon, our printers can quick- 
ly find your old address and make 
the necessary change. 



JANUARY, 1969 



25 



Superior, Wisconsin Honors Swanson 




Hugo Swanson, 82, third from left, above, has been called "Mr. Labor" in Superior, 
Wisconsin. A veteran of 45 years of service as executive secretary and building 
manager of the Superior Labor Temple Assn., a member of the Brotherhood for 
66 years and a leader of many civic and labor organizations, Swanson was honored 
at a recent testimonial dinner in his home city. 

In the picture above, Brother Swanson is congratulated by Joseph Wiesinger, left, 
president of the Duluth AFL-CIO Central Body. Also shown are Mrs. Swanson and 
the Swanson's son, Robert, who is dean of the graduate school at Stout State 
University, Menominie, Wise. The younger Swanson joined Local 755 and later 
cleared into Local 1074, Eau Claire, Wisconsin. 



Veteran Bricklayer Leader Is Honored 

■ 




Veteran labor leaders paid tribute to Bricklayers' President Emeritus Harry Bates 
recently in Washington, D. C, on the occasion of his 86th birthday. Among those 
attending a special luncheon were, from left, above, C. J. Haggerty, president of 
the AFL-CIO Building and Construction Trades Department; Peter Schoemann, 
president of the United Association, Plumbers and Pipefitters; AFL-CIO President 
George Meany; Bates; and M. A. Hutcheson, general president of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. 



New Jersey Local Reports '68 Picnic 



Local 715. Elizabeth, New Jersey, held 
a family picnic at the Deutscher Club in 
Clark, last August, at which nearly 700 
adults and children were in attendance. 

Honored guests included retired mem- 
bers, graudating apprentices, and fam- 
ilies. Harry Rushton was the proud 
winner of a bicycle, and George Pagano 
won a "basketful of cheer" as a door 



prize. 

William Wolf and Frank Holzman, 
games and prizes committee, were con- 
gratulated for the wonderful job well 
done on the children's behalf. Peter 
Messier, picnic chairman, and Frank S. 
Scirrotte. recording secretary, expressed 
their thanks to all members who worked 
so diligently to make the affair a success. 



Consumer Assembly 
Sets January Dates 

Consumer Assembly, drawing dele- 
gates from local, state, regional, and 
national consumer-oriented organizations, 
will hold its third conference January 
30-31 at the Sheraton Park Hotel, in 
Washington, D. C. 

Consumer Federation of America will 
coordinate the program. Other sponsors 
include co-ops, credit unions, trade un- 
ions, farm organizations, church groups, 
senior citizens, women's organizations, 
and other consumer-oriented groups. 

A Congressional Reception at the Ray- 
burn House Office Building on Wednes- 
day evening, January 29, will provide an 
opportunity for consumers to meet their 
Congressmen. Thursday's Consumer As- 
sembly program includes a discussion of 
air and water pollution, how retail utility 
rates are set, and an in depth discussion 
of the proposed Uniform Consumer 
Credit Code. 

At Friday's session, newsmen will pose 
questions to Commissioners from federal 
regulatory agencies on the Commission's 
role in consumer protection. 

Consumer Assembly '69 is the first held 
under the aegis of Consumer Federation 
of America. Earlier Assemblies were Ad 
Hoc Committee operations which brought 
consumers together for short conferences. 
The founding of CFA as a permanent 
group in 1967 was the beginning of a 
transition from a meeting of concerned 
people involved in parts and bits of the 
consumer movement into a more vigorous 
issue-centered consumer federation. 

Recent Retirement 




George Trumbull, right, of Grand Rapids, 
Michigan, an active member of Local 
335 since 1939, has retired after serving 
as local president and as an officer in 
every other local office for the past 25 
years. At a recent meeting, Leonard Zim- 
merman, secretary-treasurer of the Michi- 
gan State Carpenters Council and member 
of Local 335, presented a watch to 
Brother Trumbull, thanking him for his 
many years of service. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 543 Member Honored in Retirement 




Pictured with Brother Tolve, center, are other Carpenter Business Representatives 
of Westchester County. 

First row, kneeling, Business Representative Anthony Macri, Local 543. successor 
to Brother Tolve; Joseph Corcione, Local 493; John Ponterio, Local 77; Frederick 
Wagner, Local 1420. Middle Row, Peter Calabrese, secretary-treasurer, Teamsters 
Local 547; Angelo Cipriano, Local 188; President Carino; Honorary Member Tolve; 
George Grimm, secretary-treasurer, Building Trades Council; Arthur Kniesch, Local 
350; John McCarthy, Local 1704; Putnam County. Top Row, James Nicholson, 
Local 53; Lucious Pendleton, secretary of the Westchester District Council of Car- 
penters; Gustave Nilson, Local 1134; and William A. Kerr, Local 447, Ossining, N.Y. 

Recently retired. Louis R. Tolve, busi- 
ness representative for Local 543. Mama- 
roneck. N.Y.. for 39 years was honored 
by the Building Trades Council. West- 
chester County. N.Y., for his outstand- 
ing service and devotion to his organiza- 
tion and fellow tradesmen. While a mem- 
ber of the Westchester District Council 
of Carpenters. Brother Tolve has served 
faithfully on the wage committee, pen- 
sion and welfare funds, attended every 



meeting of the New York State Council 
of Carpenters, served on committees for 
the General President while in attendance 
at General Conventions. 

Brother Tolve is shown in the accom- 
panying photo being congratulated by 
Pres. Charles Carino of the Building 
Trades Council. He was presented with 
a solid gold card as an honorary member 
of the Buildine Trades. 



Bantam Hockey Team Sponsored by Local 




The bantam hockey team, sponsored by Carpenters Local 1067 of Port Huron. 
Michigan, shown above, was coached by Wallace F. Child, president of Local 1067. 
The] were the 1966-67 and 1967-68 Kantam-li plinotT champions. Each bo> "us 
awarded an individual trophy. A banquet dinner was held in their honor. 



JANUARY, 1969 



27 



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Apprentices Busy in Hackensack 




Fifteen of the apprentices now being trained under the Federal Manpower Develop- 
ment and Training Act by the joint apprenticeship committee in Hackensack, New 
Jersey. 




Apprentice Joseph Miserendino receives a certificate of award for the best attendance 
at MDTA training sessions over a six-month period. He was also awarded an eight- 
point Sandvik Saw donated by Gibbons Saw Filing Company. From left to right 
are: Jim Giuliane, instructor; Henry C. Frank, Local 15 business representative; 
Apprentice Miserendino; Anthony DeSomma, vice president of Local 15, MDTA 
apprentice coorinator, and JAC chairman; James Wilson, superintendent, Bergen 
County Vocational and Technical High School (Evening Division); and Vincent 
Vitrano, JAC employer representative. 

Outstanding Florida Apprentice 

First General Vice-President Finlay C. 
Allan presents a silver tray to Arthur J. 
Birchall III, who was the winner in the 
Florida State Council Apprenticeship 
Contest as outstanding apprentice in the 
State of Florida for the year 1968. 

The signpost with the destination suc- 
cess was the theme of the graduation ban- 
quet at which some 75 building trades 
apprentices were issued their journeymen 
certificates. Close to 400 guests and dig- 
nitaries attended this 19th annual gradu- 
ation ceremonies. 



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THE CARPENTER 



TO OUR INDUSTRIAL LOCA 




Southern Regional Industrial Conference 



From the Research Department 

On November 15th and 16th your 
Brotherhood held the fourth in a series 
of industrial conferences. This confer- 
ence, which was known as the Southern 
Regional Industrial Conference, was at- 
tended by 1 39 delegates from the fol- 
lowing states: Alabama, Georgia, Mis- 
sissippi, South Carolina. Arkansas, Ken- 
tucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, 
Florida, Louisiana. Oklahoma, and 
Texas. 

The purpose of the conference was to 
give the delegates an opportunity to 
discuss, first hand, the problems faced by 
the industrial membership of the area. 
This conference also gave us an op- 
portunity to pin-point and understand 
our problems and to discuss possible pro- 
grams to cope with these problems. 

Chairman of the conference was 
Second General Vice President William 
Sidell. who was assisted by Director of 
Research D. D. Danielson. Director of 
Organization J. Lew Rhodes, and Gen- 
eral Representative John S. Rogers. 

For this conference the Research De- 
partment compiled an analysis of the 
industrial agreements of local unions 
and district councils of the United 
Brotherhood in this area. 

This compilation was broken down 
into all the various industries within the 
wood products industry and was given 
to all the participants so that they could 
make comparisons, as well as know the 
provisions of the agreements in like in- 
dustries in other localities within the 
region. They were also given statistical 
information showing the status of the 
wood products industry today and its 
possible trends. This information clearly 
showed the strong correlation between 
a high degree of organization and ef- 
fective collective bargaining, and good 
wage rates and working conditions. 

To bring about a higher degree of or- 
ganization and effective collective bar- 
gaining. J. Lew Rhodes and .1. S. 
Rogers gave the participants helpful 
material and discussed with them the 
need for, the preparation for. and the 
techniques for effective organizing and 
effective collective bargaining. Also dis- 
cussed at the conference was the use of 
our union label as an effective collective 
bargaining tool, and some of the pro- 
cedures bung considered to make its 




Seated, left to right, J. Lew Rhodes, Director of Organization; General Representa- 
tive John Rogers; Second General Vice President William Sidell; Director of Re- 
search, D. D. Danielson, and his Assistant, Claude Mears. 




use more effective. 

The results of the effectiveness of any 
conference musl be measured In the 
results obtained from holding that con- 
ference; and. as this article goes to press 

we have received numerous inquiries 

and requests for information and help 



in establishing uniform job classifica- 
tions and like wage rates and working 
conditions in like industries in the like 
economic areas of the conference 
Therefore, while all the results arc not 
yel in. we believe this conferenc can be 

labeled a success. 



J A N U A R V , 19 6 9 



29 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) SANTA MONICA, CALIFOR- 
NIA — The above group of Local 1400 
members received lapel emblems denot- 
ing 25 or more years continuous mem- 
bership in the Brotherhood. They include: 
D.A.Adams, Robert W.Adams, George E. 
Berglund, Everett Bixler, John K. Bodle, 
Walter F. Botler, Jack Cherogatti, Mi- 
chael Christensen, Julius H. Jung, Daniel 
Lacey, Claude B. Lapsley, R. L. Lunnam, 
John D. Martindale, Nick Masney, O. W. 
Mehl, Frank Norris, Ole J. Oisen, Francis 
C. Onnond, Herbert G. Patton, Alba T. 
Paul, Clifford A. Petersen, A. B. Potter, 
Galen E. Reiff, Raymond J. Selly, Glen 
H. Sexton, Sr., John W. Sinner, William 
H. Slingerland, Frank D. Spiecher, V. C. 
Swanson, A. C. Thomas, W. B. Wautelet, 
Harry Wiseblood, Glen L. Witthauer, and 
Walter S. Wood. Members who were 
not present include: William S. Adding- 
ton, Hyman Allenick, T. R. Armstrong, 
Ilialnier Backlund, G. E. Bell, Roy L. 
Bell, W. L. Bixler, Charles Booher, H. 
E. Boyd, S. H. Boyd, A. R. Bullock, 
Fritz Frerichs, Joel P. Gidlow, Ralph P. 
Heald, Howard Hereth, M. W. Hickerson, 
H. W. Jacobson, Ernest Kitson, L. E. 
Martin, Sam A. Mazurek, Leon Oliver, 
Sr., Morton C. Olson, L. W. Patty, C. R. 
Pemberton, Lloyd Samp, C. E. Schindler, 
William G. Schoenfelder, J. J. Shanley, 
George Sozzi, George D. Stuart, Owen 
Study, C. E. Symes, P. F. Terlizzi, C. E. 
Thiel, Floyd A. Thun, T. M. Tish, Al M. 
Thompkins, Don Tweedy, William A. 
Waldo, G. F. Wallen, Joseph Warren, 
G. B. Watson, N. E. Williams, and Har- 
old P. Yaple. Past trustee emblems were 
presented to Frank James and Steve Lu- 
bianetsky. 

Gordon A. McCulloch, Los Angeles 
County District Council Executive Secre- 
tary, presented members with gold ham- 
mer tie tacs as well as emblems. Terry 
Slawson, Council Business Representa- 
tive, and Armando Vergara, Council 
Organizer-Director, assisted in the presen- 
tation. 

(1A) With several Local 1400 mem- 
bers watching, Gordon A. McCulloch, 
Los Angeles District Council Executive 




Secretary, congratulates Brother Edward 
Langridge (left), 78 years "young," who 
received his 50-year lapel emblem. Ed 
started his apprenticeship in England at 
two cents per hour for a 56-hour week 
back in 1904. Other 50-year members 
who were unable to attend included: 
Lloyd Osgood, John B. Peters and George 
Steltner. 

(2) AUGUSTA, GEORGIA— Mem- 

bers of Local 283 recently presented with 
25-year membership pins, seated, left to 
right: Pinkie J. Cobb, Reuben Carver, and 
Rennie G. Booth. Standing, left to right: 
Julius C. Jowers and John C. Johnson. 

(2A) Also receiving their 25-year serv- 
ice pins from Local 283 were, left to right, 
seated: James W. Wren, Charles Robert- 
son, Z. A. Montgomery, L. F. Sikes, Mar- 
shall W. Brown, and Tommy Smith. 
Standing, left to right: Pickens B. Green, 




Sr., Arley F. Hamilton, C. L. Freeland, 
Charles E. Polatty, and Walter W. Mur- 
phey. 




2A 



30 



THE CARPENTER 



(3) CHICAGO, ILLINOIS— Local 

1784 celebrated its 96th Anniversary with 
a banquet and awards presentation cere- 
mony at the Lions Ballroom. Fifty-year 
buttons were presented to two members, 
Math Schimek and Mike Herman. Robert 
Sabo, recording secretary, reports that 
copies of the souvenir booklet, covering 
highlights of the Local Union's long and 
colorful history, are available to mem- 
bers upon request. 

Pictured are three 50-year members 
receiving congratulations from President 
Joseph Klostermann. Standing, left to 
right: Mike Herman, Nick Teitz, Math 
Schimek and President Klostermann. 

(4) NEW YORK, N. Y.— Local 2163 
presented 60-year, 50-year and 25-year 
pins to some of its senior members at an 
Annual Dinner-Dance held in New York 
City's Commodore Hotel early last year. 
Members pictured, left to right, include: 
John T. Sabistan, 40 years; Patrick J. 
Devine, vice president; John Boyl, trustee; 
William Wilkes, 61 years; Ted Shaw, 65 
years; Joseph Burnside, 63 years; Hilding 
Ecklund, 27 years; Conrad Olson, first 
vice president of the New York District 
Council, who presented the pins; Harry 
Schank, 26 years; Richard Christoffesson, 
26 years; Gunnar Dangbjerg, 41 years; 
John J. Keane, financial secretary; and 
William Dennis, 66 years. 

(5) BEDFORD, OHIO— Local 1991 
held its Merit Award Dinner-Dance early 
last year. A family-style dinner was 
served and 50-year merit award pins were 
presented by Ralph Bott, president, to 
these veteran members: Barney Olters- 
dorf, Fredericksburg, Ohio (53 years); 
Jules Gravereau, Bedford, Ohio (56 
years); and William Ermer, Bedford, Ohio 
(57 years). Twenty-five-year pins were 
received by: William Sohm, Bedford, 
Ohio (39 years); Harry Mackey, Sr., Bed- 
ford, Ohio (34 years); Leo Basel, Garfield, 
Hei?hts, Ohio (33 years); Andrew Spence, 
Phoenix, Arizona (32 years); Richard 
Scibbe, Townsville, Pennsylvania (32 
years); Harry Forepaugh, Bedford, Ohio 
(32 years); George McFarland, Kent, 
Ohio (32 years); John Shott. Parma, Ohio 
(32 years); Herbert Rainier. Maple 
Heights, Ohio (32 years); Arthur Folop, 
Brecksvillc, Ohio (31 years); Earl Hen- 
derson, Bedford, Ohio (30 years); John 
Collin, Northfield, Ohio (27 years); and 
Casey Still, Independence, Ohio (26 
years). 

Carl Koeber, Maple Heights, Ohio, re- 
ceived a Past Trustee Pin. 

Honored guests included: Alex Brack- 
enridge, District Council Day Secretary; 
Louis Fusile, District Council business 
representative, and his wife, Mary. 

Entertainment was provided by Hcrbie 
Harrison, comedian, and the Sifra Polka 
Kings. A door prize was won by Stanley 
Florek. 

Pictured at the Merit Awards Dinner 
are. left to right: Casey Sull, I.eo Basel, 
John Shott, Alex Brackenridgc. Barney 
Oltersdorf, Carl Koeber, and William 
Sohm. 





A A -'~P 


i 

A 1 


f" 


• > .1 
/ J 



JANUARY, 1969 



31 



(6) VERO BEACH, FLORIDA— At 

a recent dinner honoring senior members 
of Local 1447, membership pins were 
presented to these members, left to right, 
seated: Carl Christenson, 50 years; Nels 
Larson, 42 years; Ellis Dahlstrom, 57 
years; John Shaney, 47 years; and Steve 
Loar, 29 years. Standing, left to right: 
Carl Granl, 30 years; Elmer Grant, 26 
years; Ernest Neilsen, 31 years; Virgil 
Parker, 25 years; Rufus Powell, 25 years; 
D. B. Denmark, 25 years; Frank Clavelin, 
27 years; Oscar Fultz, 25 years and Clar- 
ence Hancock, 25 years. 

(7) SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA— 
3,200 members, wives and children at- 
tended Local 316's barbecue held at the 
Santa Clara County Fairgrounds. 

This affair, held every two years by 
the local, was thoroughly enjoyed by all. 

The festival opened at 10:00 a.m. 
with seven free carnival rides. At 1:00 
p.m. there was a pin presentation cere- 
mony honoring 25-year members. Vice 
President Pete Hutchison (third from 
right, front row) presented pins to the 
eligible recipients present, assisted by 
District Council Secretary F. O. Jorgen- 
sen (second from right, front row) and 
Financial Secretary A. Bailey. 

Brother Ellis Gustafson (third from 
left, front row) was presented with a 
fifty-year pin by Council Secretary Jorg- 
ensen. 

A barbeque roast beef dinner was then 
enjoyed by all. The rides continued until 
5:00 p.m. and were well patronized by 
the young and young-at-heart. 

It was a real family affair and gave the 
members a chance to renew old friend- 
ships and the wives and children an op- 
portunity to become better acquainted 
with the Union. 

Those receiving 25-year pins included: 
A. M. Akers, E. J. Baker, John DeCristo, 
Francis Dias, Emil Egyed, Eugene Filice, 
Lawrence Fraasch, Arnold K. Hansen, 
Lawrence Heidrick, William Hunt, Floyd 
Lankford, Arne Long, Willie Lopez, T. 
W. Lowery, C. O. McCamish, Harry Me- 
Clendon, Gussie Lee Nail, Edmund Pain- 
chaud, John Patellaro, Robert W. Peck, 
C. B. Ratliff, Willis Raymond, W. E. 
Richardson, Anthony Satariano, Frank 
Surian, Jr., Lawrence Teese, H. W. Tiller 
and E. G. Witt. 

(8) CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 
— Forty members of Local 74 were pre- 





sented with 25-year membership pins. 
Although 80 members were eligible to 
receive pins, 40 were unable to attend the 
ceremonies. Pictured are members re- 
ceiving pins, left to right, seated: George 
Tinker, William K. Greene, F. D. Red- 
mon, W. D. Mitchell, J. H. Creighton, 
Charlie W. Fritts, Herbert C. Skinner 
(general representative), John Liner, John 
Sims, Frank R. Axmacher, Truman J. 
Pickett, J. T. Young, William M. Riddle, 
James Leslie Green. Second row, left to 
right: William R. Pledger, G. A. Phillips, 
Howard Rogers, S. M. Franks, William 
H. McCallum, Johnnie W. Fritts, J. W. 
Hudson, John T. Hudson, Joe R. Howard, 
Ernest Kimbrell, T. W. Evans, William 
F. Underwood, Howard F. Gray, Sr., 
Eugene E. Uren. Back row, left to right: 
George M. Settles, Troy E. Bell, Dock 
V. Kendrick, James R. Schmidt, Norman 
B. Moore, Fred H. Fritts, Lawrence E. 
Carter, Tommie C. Varner, William N. 
Daughtrey, Henry Wilson, Rufus Jenkins, 
Oscar L. Watkins, and James L. Powers. 




(9) PASADENA, CALIFORNIA— 

Fred Thelin (left), 50-year member of 
Local 769, was presented with a scroll 
by President J. A. "Buck" Morton in 
recognition of his long service to the 
Brotherhood. The ceremony took place 
just before Brother Thelin left to enter 
the Carpenters Home at Lakeland, Flo- 
rida. Local 769 also presented Brother 
Thelin with a handsome suitcase. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 




(10) MARTINEZ, CALIFORNIA— 

Local 2046 presented its first 50-year 
membership pin to charter member, F. E. 
Humphrey, at the Annual Awards Din- 
ner. Seated, left to right: Gus Rahlves. 
first business agent of Local 2046; VV. F. 
Mellerup, charter member; and Brother 
Humphrey, who was also presented with 
a 50-year trophy designed by Tony Car- 
denas. 

(10A) Enjoying the recent Awards 
Dinner, left to right: Ed Jordan, president 
of Local 2046; Gus Rahlves, the local's 
first business agent; F. E. Humphrey, re- 
cipient of the first 50-year pin presented 
by the local; and A. A. Figone, president 
of the Bay Counties District Council. 



(10B) Pictured are members of Local 
2046 who received 25-year pins. Kneel- 
ing, left to right, front row: A. A. Figone, 
President, Bay Counties District Council; 
Elmore Anderson, T. H. Lents, George 
Machado, John Steavens, Tom Philps, 
and Paul Egbert. Second row: Andrew 
Bryan, Harry Brashier, Ed Jordan, F. E. 
Humphrey, Vick Pease, Henry Gatze- 
meyer. Smith Comstock, Gus Rahlves, 
Alexander Cook, C. E. Cowsert, Andrian 
Vanderkous, Melford Nelson, Jason 
Evens, and Walter Mcintosh. Third row: 
Charles McKinney, Fred Nelson, Jr., 
Elton Patchin. Rudolph Peterson, Jack 
Ray, John Raynor, Ramon Sanchez, Don- 
ald Terry, Robert Sullivan, Lloyd Mc- 
Donald, Killis McCrary, and James Mar- 
tin. Fourth row: Clifford Reed, Richard 
Riley, George Savage, John Venard, 
George Walker, Lawrence Willbanks, 
Dan Frazier, Aubrey Harris, L. L. Harris, 
Herman Hester, Richard Hill, Mark Man- 
love, Vernon Berg, and Hans Boeger. 
Back row: Abel Garcia, John T. Whit- 
aker, H. R. Peters, Harry Johnson, Tom 
Hudlin, Lloyd Clawson, Portor Thomp- 
son, James Johnson, W. S. Schooley, R. 
H. Sampson and Elmer Harris. 

(11) OROVILLE, CALIFORNIA— 

Local 1240 presented 25-year pins to six 



of its members early last year. Pictured, 
front row, left to right: George Lang, 
Cal Woods and Charles Pyke. Back 
row, left to right: Edwin Finseth, Virgil 
Perkins and Vernon Morrow. 




(12) PONCA CITY, OKLAHOMA— 

A 50-year pin was awarded to W. I. 
Willits (left) during a dinner meeting of 
Local 2008. The 81-year old carpenter 
is the last charter member of the local 
which was founded in 1918. Brother Wil- 
lits has been a resident of Ponca City 
since 1914. Presenting the pin is Howard 
Smith, business representative for Local 
2008. 




10B 
JANUARY, 1969 



33 



(13) DEFIANCE, OHIO— Pins for 30, 
20 and 15 years of service were presented 
to members of Local 2180 while celebrat- 
ing the 30th Anniversary of their Charter 
at a recent banquet held at the Holiday 
Inn. Four members received their first 
pension checks. Among those attending 
were: Harold Hauter, president, Maumee 
Valley District Council; Arthur Sheiber, 
Frank Stover, Ed Rethmal, John Alt, 
Salvester Moser. 



(14) INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI 

— Local 1329 members were presented 
with 25-year pins at a dinner-dance held 
early last year. Pictured, left to right, 
standing: Fred Osburn, Thomas Miller, 
William Frazell, James Worrel, David 
Burch, Cecil Guyer, Ed Vetter, Henry 
Brown, president of Kansas City District 
Council, and Kenneth Marshall, a 4-year 
apprentice, who presented the pins. 
Seated, left to right, are: Floyd Cody, J. 
H. Bloom, William Ireland, Carl Patter- 
son, Russell VanArtsdalen, William 
O'Connel, George Hirt and William 
Akers. One of the members, H. Tupper 
Smith, a 25-year member, photographed 
the group. Twenty-five-year members re- 
ceiving pins but not pictured included: 
Don Barnhart, Clyde Benefield, Frank 
Gartin, Milton Harris, Gilbert Rogers, 
Shelvy Campbell, Charles Carlock and 
Charles Fickel. 

(15) FAIRFIELD, CONNECTICUT— 

25-year members of Local 647 were hon- 
ored and presented with pins at their 65th 
Anniversary Dinner-Dance. Members pic- 
tured, left to right: George Matis, treas- 
urer; Robert McLevy, business represent- 
ative for the local and vice president of 
the Connecticut State Council of Car- 
penters, who presented the pins; Louis 
Raab, 31 years; Joseph Kovacs, secre- 
tary, 25 years; Harold Meier, 27 years; 
John Kowats, president, 27 years; Bjorn 
Jacobsen, vice president; Joseph Butkus, 
27 years; John Horosko, financial secre- 
tary. Members unable to attend: Joseph 
Scsavnyiczki. 27 years, and Stephen Te- 
lisko, 27 years. 

(16) MESA, ARIZONA— Thirty-seven 
members of Local 1216 received 25-year 
pins early last year. Twenty-eight mem- 
bers were present to receive their pins 
but nine were unable to attend the awards 
ceremony. 

(17) WESTBORO, MASSACHU- 
SETTS— Local 1459 honored Brother 
Ivan Judson Burhoe at a banquet held at 
the Chez Ami Restaurant. Brother Bur- 
hoe joined the Brotherhood in May 1913 
and has been an active member for 55 
years. Pictured are, left to right: Joseph 
Kinnarney, business agent, Local 860; 
Brother Burhoe, and Robert Chase, presi- 
dent. 





(18) FRESNO, CALIFORNIA— (No 

picture) Local 701 (Carpenters) and Local 
1496 (Millmen) were hosts at a Pin 
Awards Dinner for members with 25 or 
more years of membership. Guests at 
the dinner, which was held at the Ha- 
cienda Motel, were the members and 
wives. Special guests were the officers 
and wives of Local 1109, Visalia, Cali- 
fornia, and the officers and wives of the 
Sequoia District Council of Carpenters. 

President Joe Collins, Local 701, was 
Master of Ceremonies and membership 
pins were presented by Executive Board 
Member Charles Nichols, General Rep- 
resentative Clarence Briggs, and Presi- 



34 



THE CARPENTER 



dent Larry Null of the Sequoia District 
Council. 

Highlighting the evening was the pres- 
entation of a 65-year membership pin to 
Howard C. Bingham, a member of Local 
701 since 1903. Brother Bingham also re- 
ceived a tie and cuff links marked with 
the insignia of the Brotherhood. 

Sixty-year membership pins were pre- 
sented to C. P. Cain and Laurits Nielsen, 
Local 701. 

Fifty -five-year pins were presented to 
Hans Koch, Lenard Langenbuch, F. R. 
Roughton, and S. J. Stoudenmire of Lo- 
cal 701; and S. F. Ede and Frank Tacka- 
berry, Local 1496. 

Fifty-year pins were received by Ed 
Beecham, Leonardo Romanelli, W. S. 
Stoeckel, and H. L. Webster of Local 
701; and H. F. Dunham and Douglas 
Ede, Local 1496. 

Forty-five-year pins were presented to 
Claude Appleby, H. A. Bidwell, Clyde 
W. Clark, Roy Luttrell, T. D. Scott and 
Leon Webster, Local 701; and Ernest 
Boner, J. V. Dumlap, Alex Horn, John 
Luther and William A. Thiege, Local 
1496. 

Forty-year pins were presented to 
James P. Gainer, Ijler Johansen and 
E. A. Tegelberg, Local 701. 

Thirty-five-year pins were presented 
to Joe Hausladen and J. Roy Weirick, Lo- 
cal 701; and Frank Sowers, Local 1496. 



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Thirty -year pins «ere presented to A. 
F. Alford, Albert Bianchi, Lloyd Bidwell. 
William BogdanofT. Victor Chensoff, E. 
H. Clack, Fred Ebell, G. A. Hegquist, 
Pete Hovasapian, O. S. Hughes, Pete C. 
Jensen, A. J. Johnston, Willie J. Jones. 
H. L. Kincade, Donald I. akin. Walter 
Locke, M. B. McDaniel, Lee Miller. 
Adolph Nagle, Melvin Neff, Harry Oberg, 
B. M. Segress, Clifford Sherman, E. V. 
Strickland, James C. Teare, Kenneth 
Thompson, C. W. Traxler. Lester Wat- 
son, Jack Williams, Charles Ybarra, Nor- 
man Ziegler, and E. Zerlang, Local 701; 
and Ray Berwanger, Lee Bowen, E. E. 
Braze, M. O. Dunham, W. S. Dunham, 
Tony Gallegos. Clifford Hubbart, Ernest 
Knops, Perry Long, Bill Mackrill. H. B. 
Markham, Dan Mogenson, Russell Peter- 
son. Earl Powers, Sr., L. C. Raymond. 
Alfred Reardon, Fred Reiners, Floyd 
Scheidt, Thomas Thomsen, and Ted G. 
Tolladay, Local 1496. 

Twenty -five-year pins were presented to 
Lloyd Anderson, Arnold Berry, Clifford 
Bertram, Art J. Beyer, Clyde Bobo, Jerry 
Boiles, Jack Bracich, Paul Brooks, Otis 
O. Bryant, J. J. Burton, H. B. Campbell, 
Henry Carlson, Ross Caudle, C. C. 
Chamblee, Jack Chaney, George W. 
Clark, Sam Coffey, Ed Coleman, J. T. 
Collinsworth, C. C. Crane, Adolph Dal- 
ton, Raymond Davis, Rondy Evans, Leon- 
ard Foreman, John Gamber, Willie Gar- 
cia, Ivan Gilles, Fred Gleim, William 
Gleim, Lyle Golden, Jack Goldman, T. 
E. Gooden, Glenn W. Grant, Charles 
Greene. Jesse Hamblen, W. D. Hamby, 
Ray Hampson, Hoah M. Hicks, Lester 
High, Guy Holmes, Paul Holt, J. D. 
Howard, Fred Ibe, Carrol T. Jacobsen, 
Archie Johnson, Jack Johnson, William 

E. Johnson, Edgar Kaiser, Steve Kara- 
gozian, Sam Kindsvater. Ralph Kizer, 
Paul Knee, Jimmie Laughter, Calvin Led- 
better, Alex Locke, C. E. Lockwood, 
Thomas Loeffler, Eual Logue, S. T. Mc- 
Clung. Wayne McDonald. Norman Mc- 
Laughlin, Herman McNeeley, L. J. Man- 
ser, Sam Manske, Robert Marsh, William 
Marsh, Edward Metzler, Marshall Milam, 
Edmund Miller, George Mitchell, Mer- 
ritt Moore. Virgil Moore, L. L. Morgan. 
Charlie O. Nipp, Lester Obermann, Adel- 
sten Orbeck, Paul Papazian. James Pax- 
ton, Arthur Penner, Marvin Penncr. Peter 
Rago, Ivan Rawlings, Guy D. Reilly. 
Herschel Reynolds, Edgar Richards. John 

F. Ries, Charles Rivaist, Jim B. Seagler. 
C. C. Searcy, Noel Searcy. Asa Selby 
William Short, Leo Sisk, Cecil Smith. 
Fred Smith. Jack L. C. Smith, Joe Solko, 
A. W. Stark. Otto Steffens, Jim Stinson. 
Harry Stoeckel. Victor G. Taylor. Q. B. 
Thomas. James Van Nalta. E. E. Bogan. 
Herbert Wagner. Hubert Watkins. V. W. 
Webb. Man in Williams. Reuben Wood, 
Lewis H. York, Clyde Young, and Lester 
Zingg, Local 701: and Wesley Abbott. 
Lloyd Buck. W. C. Cummings. John 
Econnmides, Fred Fenton, Thomas Scow. 
Loren Steitz, Peter Sudd jinn, Leroy II- 
rich, Louis Vierra, J. E. Walton. Jack 
Lloyd. John McC'lelhin, Jesse Olson, 
Dick Parvainian, and Milton Prater, Lo- 
cal 1496. 



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L.U. NO. 1, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Ahnen, Peter 
Anderson, Olaf 
Jacobson, John S. 
Jensen, Jens Viggo 
Kornfiend, Frank 
Morrow, R. A. 
Olson, Gust L. 
Pearson, Harold N. 
Peterson, O. E. 
Smith, Victor E. 
Smoley, Frank J. 
Solwick, Rudy 
Wenke, O. C. 
Wittenburg, Charles F. 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Smith, William E. 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Farr, Frank 
Zumma, Frank 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Oscar E. 
Howe, Fred 
Mack, William 
Nelson, Axel 
Putz, Frank 
Terzo, Joseph 
Wagner, Herman 

L.U. NO. 64, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Courtney, G. P. 
Dix, John 
Groce, Charles 
Hoffer, Elmer P. 
Johnson, Robert L. 

L.U. NO. 90, 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Aherns, Mike 
Battegier, Anton 
Brown, James R. 
Henn, August 
Johnson. John T. 
Kimberlin, Albert Earl 
Kimberlin. Robert Earl 
Kirves, Harold E. 
Langford, John E. 
Miller, Leonard 
Schofner, Charles 

L.U. NO. 94, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Arciero, Guiseppe 
Arduini, Frank 
Beckett, Chester J. 
Bigelow, Frank 
Caporelli, Angelo 
Dallaire, Arthur F. 
Gamon, Louis 
Horton, Gerard 
Laporte, Raymond 
Lepine, Jean 
Livingston, Stanley 
Lunghi, Michael 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD, 

Birkmaier, William 
Braun, Ernest F. 



L.U. NO. 102, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

West, Chester 
Huffman, John 

L.U. NO. 107, 
WORCESTER, MASS. 

LaPlante, Louis P. 
Ramsey, Charles H. 

L.U. NO. 127, 
DERBY, CONN. 

Casey, Frederick 
Sylvester, Frank S. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Brennan, Thomas 
Catterton, Charles Donald 
Dovel, Harry Stacy 
Fitzgerald, Gerald P. 
Gabralowitz, Joe 
King, Clifton E. 

L.U. NO. 141, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bastan, Oscar 
Butler. Lee E. 
Criner, Charles 
Dahlstrom, John A. 
Filiminov, Samuel J. 
Markstrom, William 
Motis, Frank 
Muchmore, William G. 
Olson, C. Arthur 
Sandy, Frank 
Suba, Charles M. 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Barrentine, A. T. 
More, Milo M. 

L.U. NO. 166, 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Vogel, Frank 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Arnold, John N. 

L.U. NO. 184, 
SALT LAKE CITY, 
UTAH 

Eardley, George A. 
James, Sam 
Thacker, Irwin W. 
Vaughn, Joseph D. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Booth, Frank D. 
Erickson, H. F. 
Tucker, Clifford T. 

L.U. NO. 211, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Edwards, Chester J. 
Greene, Howard F. 
Hilliard, Wallace R. 
Kutcher, Joseph 
McCallister, John 
Nawrocki, Chester J. 
Nesbitt, Nathaniel, Sr. 
Shields, A. M. 
Soentgen. Ludwig 
Yuresic, George A. 



L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Ellsworth, William N. 
Hart, George 
Huhn, Franklin F. 
King, William 
LeBlance, George F. 
Mercer, Robert J. 
L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 
Dean, Edward 
Goger, Carl R. 
Koping, Victor 
Loving. Truman J. 
Slead, Donald W. 
L.U. NO. 241, 
MOLINE, ILL. 
Holder, Douglas 
Sommers, John A. 
L.U. NO. 242, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 
Bulow, William G. 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Oswald, Julius 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Corra, John 
Nordquist, Einar 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Green, Herbert 
Henderson, Raymond 
Wells, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 264, 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Bauer, John 
Cameron, Argel B. 
Erler, Joseph 
Farmer, Donald 
Felix, James R. 
Heth, Edward 
Klein, William J. 
Radtke, Elmer S. 
Reich, Willard S. 
Queen, James E. 

L.U. NO. 266, 
STOCKTON, CALIF. 

Andreason, Harold 
Ashlin, Ray 
Berdot, J. P. 
Nix, A. B. 
Toothacre, F. E. 
Watson, John 

L.U. NO. 289, 
LOCKPORT, N.Y. 

Czerwinski, Roman S. 
Eaton, Leslie T. 
Munnich, August A. 
Plump, Arnold H. 

L.U. NO. 314, 
MADISON, WIS. 

Algrim, Christian 
Anderson, Oscar 
Boeker, Arthur 
Breunig, Otto 
Brostrom, Chris 
Cooley, Lewis 
Daniels, Nel 
Eith, James 



Forsmo, S. D. 
Frederick, William 
Freiman, Alex 
Kelm, Arnold 
Kozak, Peter 
Jungbluth, Henry 
Lee, Louis 
Meyer, Robert 
Muehlenbruck, Virgil 
Nordness, Obert 
Norman, Emil 
Nygard, Paul 
Price, Patrick 
Quackenbush, Delbert 
Sherratt, Richard 
Winkler, Arthur 
Wrend, Ben 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Chisholm, William T. 

L.U. NO. 368, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Hutzaluk, Metor 

L.U. NO. 379, 
TEXARKANA, TEX. 

Bateman, R. M. 
Frantzreb, Carl H. 
Henry, Dean D. 
Pierce, Alvin 
Sellers, Scott 
Wyatt, B. W. 

L.U. NO. 413, 
SOUTH BEND, END. 

DeBruyn, Hendrick 
Fry, Harry D. 
Gowell, Frank 
Haney, Verlin 
Kohler, Gustave 
Markham, Earl 

L.U. NO. 436, 

NEW ALBANY, IND. 

Mitchell, Marshall 

L.U. NO. 488, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Dillon, Edward 
Dzibela, John 
Maki, Rudolph 
Milligan, William 

L.U. NO. 550, 
OAKLAND, CALIF. 

Diemer, Godfrey 
Foster, Earl C. 
Gelling, Ernest F. 
Granlund, William C. 
Hedge, Marvin 
Hurst, Cecil T. 
Lyons, Winfred G. 
Mizen, John R. 
Mole, Edward J. 
Pearson, Walter L. 
Prowse, James 
Ream, Fabian D. 
Speer, Kenneth 
Swenson, Henning 

L.U. NO. 574, 
MIDDLETOWN, N.Y. 

Rudy, Julius 



L.U. NO. 586, 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Aldrich, Orville L. 
Armstrong, Frankie E. 
Baker, Clyde 
Barber, Charles W. 
Cameron, Burt 
DeMoulette, Landry S. 
Dougherty, Roy R. 
Eisenbeisz, Edward 
Hannum, Elmer 
Hasselbring, William C. 
Hering, Walter E. 
Hyatt, Sherman B. 
Jensen, George 
Johnson, Albert C. 
Kaiser, James H. 
Kipping, Gus 
Lackman, Lyle W. 
McKinney, O. D. 
Martin, John D. 
Martin, R. A., Jr. 
Mitchell William A. 
Neher, Gilbert E. 
Nelson, John 
Roberson, Bennie A. 
Rogers, Robert T. 
Rust, Clyde R. 
Zine, Eli A. 

L.U. NO. 602, 
ST. LOUIS, MO 

Clark, William R. 
Conner, Claude 
Evans, Jack M. 
Fowler, Arthur 
Giese, August W., Sr. 
Held, Joseph 
Hill, James L. 
Kentch, Oliver 
Kramer, Ernest H. 
Mace, John 
Mayer, Fred T. 
Murphy, Walter W. 
Phegle, Simon 
Priese, Albert 
Theleman, Edward A. 
Tucci, Robert 
Wandling, Grover, Sr. 
Zimmerman, John O. 

L.U. NO. 674, 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Braschel, Paul 

L.U. NO. 751, 

SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Christian, William 
Jacobsen, Gary 
Marvin, Clyde 

L.U. NO. 770, 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Miller, Charles 
Naasz, John R. 

L.U. NO. 848, 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Nesheim, John 

L.U. NO. 981, 
PETALUMA, CALIF. 

Copley, Walter 
Wolfe, M. E. 

Continued on next page 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Dumas, William 
Reed, Charles 
Santti, Into 

L.U. NO. 1072, 
MUSKOGEE, OKLA. 

Clark, Ausie 
McNatt, Troy Fay 
Stubblefield, D. J. 

L.U. NO. 1093, 
GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Mclnnes, John 

L.U. NO. 1175, 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 

Lee, Harry L. 
Olsson, Thure 

L.U. NO. 1331, 
BUZZARDS BAY, MASS. 

Dugeau, Earl 

L.U. NO. 1365. 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Barwidi, John 
Hoegler, Joseph 
LaBane, John 

L.U. NO. 1376, 

FORT BRAGG, CALIF. 

McRay, Grover 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 

Shogren, Charles 



L.U. NO. 1501, 
KETCHIKAN, ALASKA 

Miller, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Poe, Leo M. 

L.U. NO. 1699, 
PASCO, WASH. 

Lewis, Eugene 

L.U. NO. 1741, 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Anderson, Milton E. 
Holzman. John J. 

L.U. NO. 1772, 
HICKSVILLE, N.Y. 

Laaksonen, Vilho 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Young, F. L. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bourgeois, Eugene J. 
Bracamontes. John C. 
Fayard, Edward G. 
Matherne, Ernest P. 
Neidhardt. Henry 
Sanders. Richard 
Seely, Irwin 

LU. NO. 1849, 
PASCO, WASH. 

Cross, Norman P. 
McDonnell, P. J. 



L.U. NO. 2067, 
MEDFORD, ORE. 

Crabb. William 
Duffy, Elliott 

L.U. NO. 2170, 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Anderson, V. B. 
Clark, R. G. 
Hammett, Edgar 
Henderson, B. H. 
Larson, Frank H. 
Morris, C. R. 
Peters, L. H. 
Simon, Bunk 
Steyskal, William 

L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

Beer, Fred 

L.U. NO. 2167, 
STURGEON BAY, WIS. 

McCarty. Harry 
Manschot, Edward 

L.U. NO. 2422, 
SONOMA, CALIF. 

Batman, Emil 

L.U. NO. 2455, 
CRESCENT CITY, CALIF. 

Arhene. August 

L.U. NO. 3127, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Canney, Samuel 
Dansvage, Ben D. 
Kolb, Anton 



MY SPARE TIME HOBBY 
MAKES ME 

$ 5°° an hour 



CASH PROFIT ^) 





START YOUR OWN SPARE TIME BUSINESS 
You can turn your spare time into 
Big Cash Profits with your own 
COMPLETE SHARPENING SHOP . . . Grind 
saws, knives, scissors, skates, lawn 
mower blades ... all cutting edges. 
Your Own Cash Business with no 
inventory . . . right at home ... no 
experience needed. 
FREE BOOK tells how you can start 
your own spare time business while 
you are still working at your reg- 
ular job. Low Cost — time payments. 

Send coupon today. 



BELSAW SHARP-ALL C0.739J Field Bldg., 
Kansas City, Mo. 64111 

Send Free Book, "LIFETIME SECURITY." No 
obligation. 



Name 

Address_ 
City 



_State_ 



-Zip- 



Precisely tapered 
claws make 
it easy to 
pull even 
headless 
nails 



The hammer with the handle 
that packs its own punch 

...thanks to El l rue i em per engineering. 

Fiberglass handle adds flex action to your swing, more dri\c 
to each stroke. 

Epoxy-bondcd filaments of unidirectional glass 
fibers deliver punch all their own. Head is 
permanently bonded to handle. 




True Temper manufactures a great 

variety of weights, shapes and claw 
designs so you can team the right hammer 
with the right job. 



/Steel-Handled Rocket' Mummer 
With all the quality features! 
Strong tubular steel handle. 

lb ounces. (#AI6R) 



Grip is cushioned for comfort, 
won't slip wet or dry — even 
in a gloved hand! 

Fiberglass-Handled 

I lammer Id ounce. 
(6FG16) 




Hand Sledge. Perfect for all-purpose use, 
lightweight. Ideal for use anywhere 
nail-pulling claws are not needed. 
Nonslip grip. 3 pound. (#40311) 



f Allien products for action people. Home, garden and lawn 
tools, golf shafts, fishing and ski equipment, j RUE I EMPER 



JANUARY, 1969 



37 



Hiiyii/Liiyil^iiiMiSfflu 




INSULATION SHEATHING 



SOUND DEAOEN1NC 
INSULATION BOARD 



INSUI-ATION 

BOARD 
SHEATHING 




A new brochure on insulation board 
sheathing has just been released by the 
Insulation Board Institute. The brochure 
describes for the first time how to build 
an exterior wall with insulation board 
sheathing and sound deadening insula- 
tion board which significantly reduces 
the penetration of outside noise. The new 
assembly is expected to be widely speci- 
fied for apartment construction where the 
sound of traffic and other noise is created 
by higher population density. 

The new brochure also reports that for 
the first time all insulation board sheath- 
ings are now "R"-Rated for their insula- 
tion value making it easier for specifiers 
to calculate total wall thermal value. 
Regular density insulation board sheath- 
ing has been rated since 1961 and now 
Vi inch thick intermediate and Vi inch 
thick nail-base sheathings are also "R"- 
Rated. Intermediate's value is "R" 1.22 
and nail-base is "R" 1.14. Regular Den- 
sity Vi inch sheathing has a "R" of 1.32 
and for regular 25/32 inch, the "R" 
value is 2.06. 

Buyers of insulation board sheathings 
will find the R Value stamped on every 
sheet produced by IBI member com- 
panies. With these values, the building 
industry can now more efficiently calcu- 
late the heat resistance factors for exterior 
walls. Precision in determining heat re- 
sistance has become important with the 
increasing popularity of central air con- 
ditioning and electric heat in residential 
construction. 



For a copy of the brochure, write 
Robert A. LaCosse, Technical Director 
Insulation Board Institute, 111 West 
Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois 
60602. 

EXPANSIVE BITS 



'PIN-BOY" 67 




Two-piece expansive bits have been in- 
troduced by Great Neck Saw Manufac- 
turers of Mineola, New York. These bits 
are adjustable, made of drop-forged alloy 
tool steel to fit Vi" and larger drills. Cuts 
holes in wood or plastic, Kit #51 will cut 
from Vi" to 1" and 1" to Wi" . Kit #71 
cuts holes from 7 /s" to 1%" and 1%" to 
3". Set-screw adjustment provides in- 
finite settings within minimum and maxi- 
mum diameter range. The kits are pack- 
aged in individual 2-compartment handy 
plastic pouches. For further information 
write Great Neck Saw Manufacturers, 
Mineola, N. Y. 

LAMINATE TRIMMER 




To complement its new line of indus- 
trial routers with exclusive cantilever de- 
sign. Black & Decker has developed the 
#440 Vi HP Laminate Trimmer that can 
be converted to a Vi HP Router. 

The #440's carbide veneer trimming 
bit makes flush and bevel cuts on flat or 
curved surfaces with bit clearly visible at 
all times. The trimmer has a non-rolling 
guide that will stop excessive glue build- 
up. There is a new quick reference depth 
adjustment scale and faster adjustment of 
edge guide both vertically and horizon- 
tally. A clear plastic chip shield safe- 
guards vision. 

An exclusive — guide rods have been 
positively mounted in threaded holes to 
eliminate "walking." The #440 has a 
larger diameter armature shaft for less 
deflection and better cutting. 

By removing trimmer base 440B and 
substituting a 44 IB router base, this 
trimmer is converted to a Vi HP router. 

For more information, write: Product 
Information Service, The Black & Decker 
Mfg. Co., Towson, Maryland 21204. 



mf • 

I 

m 




"Pin-Boy" 67 is a new dual-purpose 
tool. A heavy-duty hammer-drive tool for 
hammer driven fastening into masonry 
and steel up to ?io". 

Pins are self-positioned in the "Pin- 
Boy" barrel and held straight for straight 
driving. Special design of the tool directs 
all the striking energy — "focuses the 
force" — helps you drive fastening pins 
straight and sure. Gives you holding 
power and strength at low cost. Uses 
Remington Va" Fastening pins. 

Tool converts quickly and easily to a 
hammer-drive drill which accepts ma- 
sonry drills with tapered shanks. The 
tool is ideal for drilling holes when using 
expansion fasteners. 

For more information on the Reming- 
ton "Pin-Boy" 67, write Remington Arms 
Company, Inc., 25000 South Western 
Avenue, Park Forest, Illinois 60466. 

"PIN-BOY" SIDE HANDLE 




dC^- 



w 



The Remington "Pin-Boy" Side Handle 
can save you time, which is money, on 
your fastening into masonry and steel, 
wood to concrete, wood to steel, steel to 
concrete, resulting in increased production 
and a sharp decrease in construction and 
maintenance cost. 

Remington's fastening pins are self- 
positioned in the barrel. Special design of 
the tool directs all the energy — "focuses 
the force" — helping you to drive fasten- 
ers straight and sure. 

Extended side handle insures visibility 
and safety; makes close-quarter fastenings 
easy. Uses Remington's Va" fastening 
pins. 

For more information on the Reming- 
ton "Pin-Boy" Side Handle, write Reming- 
ton Arms Company, Inc., 25000 South 
Western Avenue, Park Forest, Illinois 
60466. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



—LAKELAND NEWS — 

John Fairnington of Local Union 188, Yonkers, N.Y., arrived at the Home 
November 6, 1968. 

Fredrik V. Leivo of Local Union 1308, Lake Worth, Florida, arrived at the Home 
November 7, 1968. 

William G. Porter of Local Union 430, Wilkinsburg, Pa., arrived at the Home 
November 7, 1968. 

Stanley Slawick of Local Union 1367, Chicago. Illinois, arrived at the Home 
November 15, 1968. 

Gust Johnson of Local Union 1590, Washington, D.C., arrived at the home 
November 26, 1968. 

George S. Nutt of Local Union 586, Sacramento, California, passed away Novem- 
ber 2, 1968. Burial was at Sacramento. 

Leroy Turner. Sr. of Local Union 349, Orange, N.J., passed away November 7, 
1968. and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Jarvis C. Miller of Local Union 50, Knoxville, Tenn., passed away November 15, 
1968, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Members who visited (he Home during November 1968: 



R. E. Dayton, Lakeland, Florida. 
L.U. 200 

Harry P. Coton, Orange City, Florida 

Merritt W. Foss, San Mateo, Califor- 
nia. L.U. 2164, S.F. 

Mr. & Mrs. Nilo Kataja, Lake Worth, 
Florida. L.U. 2006 

Paul R. Baker, Daytona Beach, Flor- 
ida. L.U. 1725 

James W. Brenner. Wilkinsburg. Penn- 
sylvania. L.U. 430 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul C. Rinder, Everett, 
Washington. L.U. 562 

J. Harold Dye, Augusta, Georgia. L.U. 
283 

Otto High, Duluth, Minnesota. L.U. 
361 

Bernard B. McCauley, Evanston, 111. 
L.U. 1307 

Louis J. Multerer. Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. L.U. 1741 

William R. Johnson. N.Y.C., N.Y. 
L.U. 1456 

Vincent Kianke. Muskegon, Michigan. 
L.U. 1033 

LeRoy Turner, Jr.. Irvington, N.J. 
L.U. 349 

Clarence G. Naylor ('?), Pleasant, W. 
Va. L.U. 1159 

August Boniface. Juno. (?). L.U. 119 

Vine Delany, Clarwater. Florida 

Martin Porges, Secy.-Treas. L.U. 257 

Edgar Lackey, Bingen. Wash. L.U. 
1896 



G. E. Smith. Raderswood. W. Va. 
L.U. 1207 

Hilding Blomquislt (?), Floral Park, 
N.Y. L.U. 257 

G. Nelson Miller, Alton. 111. L.U. 377. 

Simon H. McCallum, Orlando, Florida. 
L.U. 502 

Samuel A. Harris, Arkon, Ohio. L.U. 
639 

Hal Gibson, Jensen Beach. Florida. 
L.U. 297 

Mrs. Betty Rhodes, Jacksonville. 
Florida 

Anthony Kausa, Worcester, Mass. 
L.U. 107 

Wm. B. Kennedy, No. Arlington, N.J. 
L.U. 306 

Knute Olsen, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. 
L.U. 391 

James E. Smith & Wife. Cleveland. 
Ohio. L.U. 11 

Kenneth S. Kline. Minneapolis. Minne- 
sota. L.U. 7 

Roscoe J. Goodway, Maplewood, Mo. 
L.U. 1739 

Joseph Malcolm Brohard, Westerville 
(?), L.U. 200 

Wm. Forster & Wife, Rochester, N.Y. 
L.U. 72 

Mr. & Mrs. L. E. Ritter, Port Royal. 
S.C. L.U. 2088 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel F. Steel. Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio L.U. 1206 

Mr. & Mrs. William Nuninen, Detroit. 
Mich. L.U. 1433 



If you could see 
the people 
* XARE feeds. 




...you wouldn't need 
coaxing. Mail a check. 

CARE Food Crusade — N«w York 10016 
or your nearest CARE office address 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Andel. Theodore 


35 
27 


Belsaw Power Tools 


Belsaw Sharp-All Co 


37 


Chicago Technical College . . . 


16 




2S 




39 


Estwing Manufacturing 


24 


Foley Manufacturing 


23 


Goldblatt Tool Co 


20 


Hydrolevel 


39 

15 


Irwin Auger Bit 


Kant-Slam 


35 




27 




20 


Stanley Works Back Covei 


True Temper 


37 






LAYOUT LEVEL 

•ACCURATE TO 1/32* 

" REACHES 100 FT. 

• ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Woter Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footing, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7 " container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anyw here you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate %/*' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since li 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.9-5 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on '.[ Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSolo, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER tEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




MAKE 



AKE $20 to $30 EXTRA 

on each 
STAIRCASE 



ELIASON 




STAIR GAUGE 



\ 




Saves its cost in OXE day- — does a 
better job in half time. Each end of 
Eliason Stair Gauge slides, pivots and 
locks at exact length and angle for per- 
fect fit on stair treads, risers, closet 
shelves, etc. Lasts a lifetime. 

Postpaid icash witlt order) or C.O.D. d» -i c QC 

plus postaoe Only -P I J. 7 J 




ELIASON STAIR 
GAUGE CO. 

6005 Arbour Lane 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55436 



JANUARY, 19 6 9 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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8 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



A Hard Look at Taxation and Welfare 



■ A little over six months ago — last May, to 
be exact — I commented on the sad financial state 
of the nation. At that time, it was obvious that an 
additional tax bite on the paycheck was inevitable. 
Shortly thereafter, the 10% surtax was enacted 
by the Congress and has been in effect ever since. 

Unfortunately, the surtax neither cured the fi- 
nancial ills of the nation nor halted the rapid 
growth of inflation. 

In theory, the surtax is to run out next June. 
The chances are 10 to 1 that it will be renewed 
for at least another year. President-elect Nixon 
indicated during his campaign that he would elimi- 
nate the surtax if elected. Now, he seems to be 
having second thoughts on the matter. Far from 
expecting a termination of the 10% surtax, most 
experts are convinced that additional tax meas- 
ures will be forthcoming. 

In May, I said, "While no one particularly relish- 
es paying taxes, few will object to an additional 
tax burden when the future of the nation is at 
stake." I know without taking a concensus that 
I echoed the feelings of practically all members of 
our Brotherhood. 

Most Americans are willing to pay more taxes 
if the ability of the nation to survive is involved. 

However, it was my feeling then, and it is my 
feeling now, that a thorough overhaul of the income 
tax structure is necessary before any new taxes 
are imposed on those who work for a living. There 
simply are too many loopholes by which those 
who profit most from our economic system escape 
a fair share of their tax obligations. 

There are on the market at least a dozen books 
and services which give businessmen tips on how 
to take advantage of tax loopholes. 

They tell how to spread income among all 
members of the family to lower the total tax bite; 
how to get tax-free income from investments; how 



to time vacations so they can be charged off as busi- 
ness expenses; how to deposit money in foreign 
banks without having to pay taxes. 

None of these loopholes have any meaning for 
the average man. They are designed to provide 
tax shelter for those who need such shelter least. 

U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT, no 
booster of the working man, recently pointed out 
in an article that it is the poor, not the rich, who 
pay the bigger share of earnings in taxes. 

It cites a study made by the magazine's own 
economic experts showing that Federal, state, and 
local taxes combined syphon off around a third 
of the annual income of the average family in the 
$3,000 to $10,000 bracket. In the upper brackets, 
that is, families making more than $15,000 per 
year, the tax burden falls to 28% of annual in- 
come. 

Many taxes, such as sales taxes, property taxes, 
Social Security taxes, all take a bigger proportion 
out of the worker's paycheck than they do out of 
the wealthy. 

The whole matter of taxation is due to come to 
a head in the new session of Congress. Perhaps, 
more taxes will be necessary. If they are, all 
thoughtful Americans will face up to the situation. 
But it will be extremely difficult to sell an added 
tax bite to the workingman if tax reforms are not 
instituted to place a fairer share of the burden on 
those who are best able to pay. 

At the same time the tax structure is being over- 
hauled, a hard look should be taken at the mount- 
ing cost of welfare. No one objects to adequate 
welfare for those who are physically or mentally 
incapacitated, but the able-bodied need to be given 
opportunities for work rather than relief. 

In New York City, one family in eight is on 
welfare, while the Sunday papers, on the average, 
carry 60 to 70 pages of help wanted ads. 

Somehow or other this does not add up. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



A CHILD... 
A DISEASE . . . 
A CHALLENGE . . . 





| HE CHILDREN'S ASTHMA 
[RESEARCH INSTITUTE AND 
HOSPITAL is presently caring for the 
greatest number of asthmatically-crippled boys 
and girls in all of its long history. The C. J. 
Haggerty Fund is an integral part of this 
program. It provides care and research for 
these children who come from every sector of 
the country. They are given free medical care 
regardless of creed or origin. 

Through the findings of CARIH's world- 
famous Institute, they are able to save countless 
more lives that would otherwise be lost. The 
need for interpreting diverse information about 



asthma is reflected in the thousands of inquiries 
received each year by the Medical Department 
from private physicians and prominent clinics 
for the special help needed in treating their own 
asthmatic patients. 

At the present time many children of Trade 
Unionists' families are being rehabilitated at 
this nationally-renowned Institution. Through 
Labors' support, the Haggerty Fund aids these 
children and many more like them. 

Right now, as you read this, children 

from all over the world — some perhaps, 

from your own community — or 

your own Local — are in residence in 

Denver, Colorado, on a beautiful 12^2 

acre campus called the Children's Asthma 

Research Institute and Hospital. These 

are not ordinary children. They are victims 

of intractable asthma — asthma so 

severe that it is deemed "medically hopeless" 

in their own communities. 

It costs $6,000 to treat and care for a 
child at CARIH for one year, $12,000 for 
the average 2-year stay — not one penny 
of which is charged to the child or his family. 
Who pays the bill for treating, housing 
and feeding these children? Who furthers 
the great strides of CARIH's research 
program, coming ever closer to the day 
when asthma and other allergic diseases 
which now afflict more than 5 million 
Americans will at last be conquered? 
The answer must be you and the many other 
individuals and Unions who have come to 
care about CARIH. 

Send your contribution today to the 
address shown below. 



CARIH National Labor Council 



Children's Asthma Research Institute & Hospital 

1258 N. HIGHLAND AVENUE, LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 90038 



The folding 




The X226 offers you maximum utility in an ex- 
tension folding rule. With it, your inside mea- 
surement is at one focal point. 

The X226 provides end-to-end or hook mea- 
surements in multiples of exactly 6" (6", 12", 
18", 24", etc.). Can also be used as a marking 
gauge in multiples of 2" (2", 4", 6", 8", 10" 
and 12"). Ideal for door installations, too, be- 
cause it can be opened to give you exact end-to- 
end measurements for three standard doors: 30", 
32" and 36". Stud markings every 16". Exten- 



sion slide extends — and reads — in both direc- 
tions. 

Joints of the X226 snap tight . . . stay rigid! 
Its StanGuard™ yellow finish protects numbers 
and graduations for extra-long life in day-to-day 
use. And brass tips and protector plates for added 
wear life. Stanley Tools, 
Division of The Stanley 
Works, New Britain, 
Connecticut 06050. helps you do things right 



STANLEY 



P. S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest power tools. 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



NT 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 








•"""* 




■SH A~Y~r* 











GENERAL OFFICERS OF 



GENERAL OFFICE: 



THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA lOltogJonAw, N.W y 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



<3/A\DQ[p 




No. 2 



VOLUME LXXXVIII 

UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



,wl:bo 3 pses:!.'. 
%.Tigiia // 



9 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

The William L Hutcheson Memorial Forest 2 

LBJ Praises Labor Support in Farewell Talk 7 

Southpaws National Geographic Society 8 

Table of Malcontents 10 

A Statement of Labor Contract, Vintage 1914 17 

Minutes of the International Contest Committee 19 

Our Readers Rate the Occupations 25 

DEPARTMENTS 

Editorials 6 

Washington Roundup 9 

Canadian Report 12 

Of Interest to our Industrial Locals 15 

What's New? 18 

Local Union News 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 26 

What's New in Apprenticeship 28 

Service to the Brotherhood 31 

In Memoriam 36 

Plane Gossip 38 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building. 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. Washington. D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington. D. C. 20016. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20; in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

While most people are familiar with 
the great achievements of Abraham 
Lincoln, 16th president of the United 
States, many are vague in recollecting 
some of his youthful accomplish- 
ments. 

Lincoln was born on a farm in 
Kentucky, February 12, 1809. At the 
age of eight, he and his family moved 
to the valley of Pigeon Creek in 
southern Indiana. "An axe was put 
into his hands" and he proceeded to 
help construct their three-sided log 
cabin in the forest. Since he possessed 
great physical strength, even at an 
early age, Abe's chief task was clear- 
ing the woods. 

In his youth he was noted for the 
tremendous skill and power with 
which he could swing an axe. After 
his family migrated to Illinois in the 
fall of 1830, he made use of his skill 
as an axe-man, splitting fence rails. 
During the first year after the family's 
arrival in Illinois, he fulfilled an 
obligation to split three thousand rails. 

Arter a long day's work he would 
sit by the fire reading, or perhaps 
writing on a piece of wood which he 
used for a slate. During his entire 
life, he received less than a year's 
formal schooling, yet his imagination 
and indomitable ambition enabled 
him to achieve the highest office in the 
land. The picture, copyrighted in 1909 
by F. A. Sdmeider, is from the Li- 
brary of Congress. 




+±LM 





ujiiunm i. HUTWEson 

mEmORIPL FOREST .. 



continues to play vital role in man's search for a better world 



THE CARPENTER 



LEFT: An aerial view of the William L. Hutcheson Me- 
morial Forest, looking south. The main entrance to the 
forest is at the lower left of the picture. Note the path 
leading into the woods, where the public tour begins. 

BELOW: One of many maps made of the forest by bota- 
nists and zoologists, who chart the location of flora, fauna, 
and various research projects underway. This particular 
map is concerned primarily with undergrowth in the area. 




E3 TSJy&V 



FIELD 
MARSH 



■ It's possible that no tract of 
woodland along the Eastern Sea- 
board or on the entire North Ameri- 
can continent, for that matter — is 
under such intensive study as the 
William L. Hutcheson Memorial 
Forest in central New Jersey. 

The birds are watched, banded, 
and counted. (More than 100 spe- 
cies have been identified as residents 
or visitors, 40 of which nest there 
regularly.) 

The box turtles which crawl 
through the underbrush and field 
grasses are having their body tem- 
peratures checked regularly and their 
metabolism in hibernation studied. 

At annual intervals, two hectares 
(approximately 6 acres) of sur- 
rounding grassland are plowed un- 
der and allowed to rcvecetate natu- 



rally. Then scientists keep records 
of the seedlings which sprout there, 
the field mice and moles which re- 
enter the plot, the insects which are 
attracted, and just about every de- 
velopment which may be of scien- 
tific value. 

In the forest, botanists take note 
of the time of blooming and leafing 
of plants and shrubs. The tower- 
ing hardwoods are measured and 
mapped. 

The William L. Hutcheson Me- 
morial Forest is truly an outdoor, 
living laboratory. 

It is, say the scientists, a resource 
for research in forest ecology. The 
word "ecology" means, according to 
Webster: "biology dealing with the 
mutual relations between organisms 
and their environment." Ecology, 



you might say, deals with all of na- 
ture. 

And there is no better place for 
such studies than a woodland such 
as the Hutcheson Memorial Forest. 
It is one of the last stands of prime- 
val hardwood forests in the United 
States. The towering oaks and other 
trees are a living testimony of the 
past — of what forests were like be- 
fore the arrival of the white man — 
and even before the coming of the 
Indians. 

Somehow this 65-acre woodland 
escaped the inroads of woodcutters 
and land-clearers through the cen- 
turies. Once called Mettler's Woods, 
it has remained relatively untouched 
since colonial times and in the hands 
of the Mettler family. 

Thomas Mettler. the last of the 



FEBRUARY, 1 969 




BELOW: Dr. Richard T. T. Forman, Rutgers botanist, h 
prepares to conduct a public tour of the forest. With him 
Dean Christensen, superintendent of the forest and a Rutg 
graduate student. 



The entrance to the forest, with its tall wooden arch. The resi- 
dent superintendent's house it at right. 

.■ 



■■ 



w« t HUTCHE50I 
MEMORY FOREST 



i Heft are sus!jf-lwacr« sip 



' • '!.:- '■ 



f fniure «S V dewlf-d sM] is ioentik 



stu&esof riatur? s p : 



rid *, tk S o* w' c. . a h ; *SSl5pSL 

' .RESEARCH AREA 
Not open to public except 
for scheduled tours or by 
special permission of the 
Botany Department, Rutgers 
University. 




I : : y^ : . :<*:*■ ■ 

■ 

Mitg. 

A sign beside the entrance describes the facilit>'s purpose. 



ABOVE: Some of the many visitors who gather on weeke 
afternoons to join the public tours. Students, nature lov< 
artists, and family groups enjoy the outings. 




i M 

Dr. Murray F. Buell, Rutgers botanist 
and forest director, measures the girth 
of a tree. 



family to own it, decided to dispose 
of it in 1954. Despite the rising 
value of the tract as a residential 
area, Mettler, who recognized its 
scientific value, offered it to Rutgers, 
the State University of New Jersey, 
at a price substantially lower than 
its commercial value. Rutgers pro- 
fessors and graduate students had 
been conducting research studies on 
the tract since 1930 and were de- 
lighted at the University's oppor- 
tunity to acquire it. 

A drive to raise funds was orga- 
nized, but only half of the needed 
$100,000 was raised. 

It was our own organization which 
saved the forest for Rutgers and pos- 
terity. The United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, 



stimulated by its New Jersey mem- 
bers, supplied the needed funds, and 
the deed was turned over to the uni- 
versity, with the firm stipulation that 
it cannot be resold and must remain 
in its natural state. 

Mettler's Woods became the Wil- 
liam L. Hutcheson Memorial Forest, 
a living memorial to the late presi- 
dent of our Brotherhood and father 
of General President M. A. Hutche- 
son. It became also living testimony 
of the Carpenters' dedication to the 
conservation of the world's natural 
resources. 

Today, the 65-acre woodland and 
70 acres of fields which surround it 
serve as a natural facility for scien- 
tist and layman alike. 

The public is invited to join guid- 



THE CARPENTER 



HW»* 




ABOVE: Plant life grows in 
the shade under green nylon 
canopies in one experiment. 

RIGHT: A sign warns visi- 
tors that a roped-olf plot is 
impregnated with radioactive 
isotopes in a plant study. 




fl 



ABOVE: Doctor Forman pauses in the overgrown stream 
bed of Spooky Brook, at the northern edge of the forest, to 
describe the plants there. 




ed tours held regularly on weekends 
throughout the year. These tours are 
conducted by University botanists 
and zoologists, and they take about 
one hour. (A schedule of future 
tours may be obtained by writing Dr. 
M. F. Buell, Director of the Hutche- 
son Memorial Forest, Department of 
Botany, Rutgers, The State Univer- 
sity, New Brunswick, N. J.) Some 
of the trees which visitors see on the 
tour date back more than 300 years 
to a time when Indians roamed the 
woods. 

Research at the Forest is per- 
formed, for the most part, by candi- 
dates for masters' degrees and doc- 
torates in the fields of botany, zool- 
ogy, soil analysis, biology and for- 
estry. Recently a two-year research 



grant was received from the National 
Science Foundation. Previously that 
agency had made a three-year allo- 
cation to support research projects 
there. 

The Rutgers Department of Bot- 
any publishes periodically a William 
L. Hutcheson Memorial Forest Bul- 
letin. The bulletin contains data, 
maps, and charts of research findings 
at the forest. There are reports, for 
example, of "the natural harvesting 
of trees," "alien plant species," "soil 
development on the red beds of New 
Jersey," and "climate, microclimate 
and vegetation relationships on 
north and south forest boundaries." 
These reports are like pieces of a 
great natural jigsaw puzzle which, 
fitted together, give man a clearer 



picture of his world. 

The Brotherhood's pride in spon- 
sorship of this research facility and 
natural setting was expressed by 
General President M. A. Hutcheson 
at the dedication of the forest in 
\955: 

"Next to farming, carpentry is the 

oldest vocation in the world." he 

pointed out. "Somewhere back in 

the dim ages before history was writ- 

(Continucd on page 30) 

Misen, (he artist who created the sketches 
accompanying this article is in reality 
Michael Senich, proprietor of the Misen 
Galleries of Princeton. N. I. and a regular 
participant in Hutcheson Forest tours. 
Misen was at one time a cartoonist for the 
Daily Mirror of New York City, a combat 
artist with the Coast Guard during World 
War II. and still works for King Features 
of New York City. 



F E B R 1 1 A R Y 



969 




EDITORIALS 



m^tmaammatmm 



# 



The Flu, Then and Now 



One American in every four has been hit by the 
Hong Kong flu, this winter, according to the Gallup 
Poll in a special "flu census." 

Such a statistic indicates rough times for many 
Carpenter families in the early months of 1969, but 
when you consider the number of deaths credited, so 
far to the Hong Kong flu (in the U.S. as of January 11, 
there were 3,754 above the normal total at this time of 
year), you can take consolation in the fact that you 
weren't born fifty years ago. 

Exactly a half century ago, at the close of World 
War I, North America was undergoing its most disas- 
trous influenza epidemic. The "bug" had first ap- 
peared in early September, 1918, in Boston, New 
York, and Philadelphia. By mid-October the flu 
death rate had risen 700% over the September death 
toll. Doctors were baffled. The epidemic spread to 
46 of the 48 States, killing between 400,000 and 
500,000 people. Many war plants shut down; tele- 
phone service was cut in half; there were 127,000 
cases of flu in the army camps. 

Panic spread rapidly. Newspapers were filled with 
rumors, outlandish theories, and long lists of the dead. 

The epidemic finally disappeared in 1919, leaving 
some afflicted with cardiac problems, Brights disease, 
and tuberculosis. 

The Spanish flu of 1918-1919 was truly a killer. 
Its Hong Kong cousin might have been one too . . . 
but for modern communications, modern drugs, and, 
perhaps, the higher, healthier standard of living 
which we enjoy today. 

This, at least, is one consoling thought as we move 
through the troubled times of 1969. 

* Vest Pocket Parks 

The shortage of playgrounds for children in our 
cities, particularly in the ghettos, has reached the 
crisis stage. In many areas all that is left for growing 
youngsters is a rare, garbage-strewn vacant lot or a 
dangerous, crowded street. 

Many civic officials do not realize that, in the 
United States, Federal funds are now available for 
the creation of so-called "vest pocket" parks — small 
but attractive parks transformed from idle, vacant 



lots. Fifty percent of the costs for such parks is paid 
for by Federal funds under the Urban Beautification 
Program. 

Brotherhood members and local unions concerned 
with urban renewal problems in their area should 
keep this in mind the next time they look over a city 
budget or meet with local public officials for city 
planning. 

* Pass Up the Crapes 

Farm workers in the Central Valley of California 
are struggling for decent wages, sanitary working 
conditions, and union recognition. They face in this 
struggle a collection of grape growers who act like 
feudal barons and who refuse to discuss their 
grievances. They face, also, the importation of strike- 
breakers from Mexico, who will work for wages far 
below the level of decency. 

There are few laws to protect migratory farm 
workers, and these few are seldom enforced. Conse- 
quently, the only method of effectively bringing the 
grape growers to the bargaining table is a strong 
consumer boycott. 

Every member of the Brotherhood is urged to pass 
up table grapes at his local super market, until the 
grape growers come out of the Dark Ages. Join this 
nationwide boycott now! 



* 



Federal First Rid 



Federal safety legislation died in the last session 
of the 90th Congress, but the need for such legisla- 
tion did not die with it. 

An average of 55 American workers dies every day 
from on-the-job accidents and occupational diseases. 
Another 8,500 are permanently disabled every work- 
ing day. It adds up to 7 million casualties per year, 
a staggering total in human misery and suffering. 

You can't legislate carelessness away from a work 
site. Only a continuing educational program to pro- 
mote alertness on the job will ease that situation. 

But you can legislate safety inspection programs, 
and you can require certain safety standards which 
remove the odds against accidents. 

The 91st Congress should take these first aid steps 
now. 



THE CARPENTER 



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The gathering in the lobby of AFL-CIO Headquarters as the retiring President bid unionists a warm farewell. 

LBJ Credits Labor Support for Many Legislative Gains 



■ Exactly one week before he left 
office, President Johnson picked an 
unprecedented way to thank organized 
labor for its cooperation wjth him 
over the last five years. 

He "invited" himself to the AFL- 
CIO building and before an overflow- 
ing crowd in the first floor lobby de- 
clared: 

"I know of no living single group 
that I think has been more responsible 
for the advances that have been made 
... in the last five years than the 
AFL-CIO. headed by George Meany, 
and supported by millions of men and 
women throughout the country." 

The President unveiled a frame 
layout of 1 00 pens he used to sign 
landmark legislation over the five-year 
span. 

"I would like to present to the 
working people of this country and to 
the gallant, able and trusted leaders, 
a symbol of what the last five years 
has always been about." he said. 

The pens were used to sign legisla- 
tion including education, social secu- 
rity, civil rights, conservation, war on 
poverty, medicare, housing, minimum 
wage and manpower training. 



The President said that while he 
and Meany have not always agreed on 
procedure or method "I think we 
have always agreed on purpose and 
objective." 

He recounted how closely the two 
have worked together, saying: 

"I looked over my diary last night 
and I have met with Mr. Meany and 
his assistants many times, but with Mr. 
Meany, himself, 49 times in personal 
meetings either in my office, the oval 
room or in the mansion." 

"In addition to that, he has called 
me or I have called him 82 additional 
times. We have had some rather ex- 
tended conversations in those tele- 
phone calls." 

Johnson said that during the last 
five years "our general goal has been 
the greatest good for the greatest num- 
ber. We have tried to improve work- 
ing conditions: we have tried to im- 
prove wages and we have tried to see 
that profits were reasonable." 

One difference that the President 
said he had with Meany was over 
Johnson's proposal to merge the Labor 
and Commerce Departments. 

Meany thanked the President "on 



the behalf of the AFL-CIO, its lead- 
ership, its millions of members and on 
behalf of the millions more who will 
be beneficiaries of the legislation 
which you signed into law and which 
is represented by the pens and titles 
of the various bills enacted during the 
last five years." 

He singled out education as one 
phase of the Johnson legislative record 
because "in the years to come, our 
grandchildren and their children will 
be beneficiaries. . . ." 

"If nothing else had happened in 
these five years, except the education 
program," Meany said, "this Adminis- 
tration would have gone down in his- 
tory as one of the greatest since the 
establishment of the Republic." 

He summed this up in statistics, 
alone. In fiscal 1960 there was $600 
million authorized for Federal aid to 
education. In fiscal 1 969. this was 
tipped to $6 billion. 

The AFL-CIO leader said that in 
"this field alone, in addition to all the 
other things that happened and in 
which we were interested in the last 
five years, I think that Lyndon John- 
son will go down in history as one of 
our greatest Chief Executives." ■ 



FEBRUARY, 19 6 9 



SOUTHPAWS 

Lefties Manage to Survive in a Right-Handed World 



■ An estimated 300,000,000 peo- 
ple suffer the same handicap that 
afflicted Benjamin Franklin, Babe 
Ruth, Leonardo da Vinci, Michel- 
angelo, Charlemagne, and Alexander 
the Great. 

Each was left-handed in a right- 
handed world. 

"Southpaws" — a term that ap- 
parently originated on the baseball 
diamond — have been misunderstood 
since earliest times, the National 
Geographic Society says. The left 
side traditionally was linked with 
evil and left-handedness with dul- 
lards. 

The devil was popularly depicted 
as being left-handed. The Romans 
had a word for left — sinister. 

Considering it unwise to enter a 
house left foot first, rich Romans 
posted slaves at their doors to as- 
sure that arriving guests put their 
best foot forward. In time, the ser- 
vants became known as footmen. 

Life continues to frustrate the 
sinistrally inclined. Most everyday 
products are designed with the right 



BABE 
RUTH 



hand in mind: Telephones, scissors, 
wrist watches, adding machines, 
gearshifts, fountain pens, micro- 
scopes, among others. 

One major exception, the type- 
writer, has been termed the "only 
left-handed machine in general use." 
The most frequently used keys are 
on the left. 

Perhaps ten percent of the world 
is left-handed. No one knows why. 
Some scientists believe the tendency 
is inherited; others feel environment 
plays a role. 

A neurologist succinctly summed 
up knowledge of the subject: "You 
can put all we know about left- 
handedness on one page." 

In recent years, the world has 
become somewhat easier for this 
sizable minority. Manufacturers 
now turn out left-handed golf clubs, 
egg beaters, fishing reels, desks, and 
other articles. Some banks furnish 
left-handed checkbooks, the stubs 
to the right of the checks. 

The spate of specially designed 
products recently prompted a Lon- 



don resident to open a shop for left- 
handed customers only. Even the 
clerks are southpaws. 

All in all, left-handers have borne 
their burden bravely. Julius Caesar, 
for instance, remarked that it didn't 
interfere in the least with his ambi- 
tions. Nor has it discouraged Pablo 
Picasso, Charles Chaplin, Beatle 
Paul McCartney, or Queen Mother 
Elizabeth. 

Some lefties resolve the problem 
by becoming ambidextrous. Presi- 
dent James A. Garfield reportedly 
became so adept that he once took 
up two pens and wrote in Latin with 
one and in Greek with the other — 
simultaneously. 

Modern champions of left-hand- 
edness include Dr. Bryng Bryngelson 
of the University of Minnesota. 
"Left-handed people tend to be more 
creative, more imaginative than 
right-handed people," he said. 

Three hundred million people 
would agree — and three billion 
might not. ■ 




FONARDO 
DA VINCI 





BENJAMIN 
FRANKLIN 



MICHELANGELO 





JAMES A. GARFIELD 



WASHHMGTOM 




ROUNDUP 



THE NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD has named two new regional directors. Francis 
Sperandeo goes to Denver, Colorado, and Charles M. Henderson goes to Seattle, 
Washington. Henderson was formerly Regional Director at Albuquerque, New Mexico, 
while Sperandeo has been an attorney with the NLRB since 1952. 

AMERICAN WORKERS in the 1968 election handed the Communist Party the worst clob- 
bering in the Party's 40-year history in the U.S. Six different minority parties 
accumulated more votes than Charlene Mitchell, the Communist Party's presidential 
candidate. Even the obscure and nearly-forgotten Prohibition Party outvoted the 
Reds by better than 14-to-one. But the worst humiliation by far was the fact that 
a party without a candidate — and actually called "New Party Without a Candidate" — 
polled 1,480 votes nationally to the Communist Party's pitiful total of 1,075! 

THE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION has issued instructions to Federal agencies throughout 
the country to convert all their custodial, laundry and service workers to regular 
wage schedules before July 1, 1969. The order will enable these traditionally 
low-wage workers to benefit by the new Coordinated Federal Wage System which goes 
into effect in July. 

SKYROCKETING COSTS of the Medicaid program for the medically indigent must be 
brought down speedily in the opinion of the AFL-CIO. 

The Federation has called for effective controls on illegal, unethical 
activities by the medical profession as the answer to increasingly high Medicaid 
expenses. 

In a statement to Wilbur J. Cohen, Secretary of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare, AFL-CIO Social Security Director Bert Seidman bluntly accused the medical 
industry of bilking millions annually from Medicaid. The way to stop this, he 
declared, is an effective cost control system. 

WAGE GAINS UP— There were 4,500,000 who won wage and fringe gains during 1968 
ranging from 7.5 percent of straight-time hourly earnings to a median wage and 
benefit package increase of 6 percent a year over the life of the contract. The 
U.S. Department of Labor reported that "all measures of change in wages and bene- 
fit expenditures resulting from these settlements were larger than in preceding 
years." 

PROFITS STILL SOAR— Sales and profits for the manufacturing industry during the 
third quarter of 1968 were sharply higher than during the same period in 1967. 
Government figures showed sales up 10 percent and profits after taxes up 14 per- 
cent. Cash dividends paid by manufacturers in the third quarter (July-August- 
September) totaled $3.3 billion, an increase of $200 million over the same period 
in 1967. 

THE LABOR MOVEMENT will be quietly but carefully watching every member of Con- 
gress who campaigned in 1968 on a platform of "economy" and "cut the spending." 
Labor will be particularly eyeing Congressmen who denounced union wage gains that 
ranged up to 7% — when those Congressmen come to vote on a proposal to hike 
Congressional salaries from $30,000 to $42,000, a jump of better than 40^. 

NADER NAMED ADVISER— Whether incoming President Richard M. Nixon likes it or 
not, Ralph Nader, the demon consumer crusader, is going to be an advisor to his 
Administration for the next three years. Secretary of Transportation Alan S. 
Boyd has named him a member of the National Motor Vehicle Safety Advisory Council. 




TABLE of MALCONTENTS 



Reprinted from the New York Daily News, Friday, January 3, 1969 

Periodically, our contacts in Paris break through the crepes-suzetie curtain and manage 
to smuggle out choice bits of information concerning the peace talks in which the shape 
of the conference table has been a great issue. The scene is the basement of the Hotel 
Majestic, where two French carpenters are putting away a bottle of vin ordinaire. 



HENRI: "I spoke to our union delegate last night and 
he assures me that by Bastille Day we should have some 
idea of what kind of table those imbeciles upstairs want." 

PIERRE: "This could be a lifetime job, Henri. After 
they figure out what kind of table, they'll argue about the 
type of wood." 

HENRI: "Well, we should kick. The food is good, the 
wine is amusing, we get time-and-a-half at the slightest 
provocation and . . ." 

(He's interrupted by a knock at the door and goes to 
open it. A pint-sized Vietnamese in blue coveralls with 
the Viet Cong patch on the shoulder struts in and throws 
a tool-bag on the floor.) 

HENRI: "We ordered bouillabaisse, not moo goo gai 
pan. What are you doing here?" 

VC: "I'm from the carpenter division of the VC dele- 
gation. I've been ordered here to build our side of the 
table when the final plans are drawn." 

PIERRE: "The union isn't going to like this one bit; 
there's a question of jurisdiction . . ." 

VC: "I claim diplomatic immunity. By the way, have 
you guys thought of a shape for that table?" 

HENRI: "I was thinking of a round table. Maybe a 



lazy susan type so that the various factions could look at 
each other's notes." 

VC: "That's out. King Arthur had a round table and 
he was a lousy imperialist." 

PIERRE: "How about a snooker table? They could 
use the pockets for ashtrays and . . ." 

(There's another knock on the door and Pierre opens 
it. A burly character with a pencil behind his right ear 
strolls in.) 

PIERRE: "There is something you wanted, monsieur?" 

NEWCOMER: "Frank Dillon's the name. Boss car- 
penter from the U. S. delegation. Something about a 
table. I've built tables for Walter Reuther, John L. Lewis, 
Albert Shanker and dozens of others. The way I see it, 
a nice sturdy octagonal job of California redwood with a 
formica top and plenty of electrical outlets for the bug- 
ging devices . . ." 

(There is a loud argument outside, and he swings open 
the door. A carpenter from Saigon and one from Hanoi 
are pummeling each other. Dillon breaks it up and they 
come in.) 

HENRI: "This is starting to look like a Sorbonne dem- 
onstration. Now, who are you guys?" 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



SAIGON: "I represent Premier Ky. He wants a lac- 
quered table of rosewood, square with a coat of arms — 
maybe a golden dragon rampant on a field of PX's, or 
even a yellow-breasted Asiatic Ingrate in full flight over 
a rice paddy." 

HANOI: "My name is Foo Yung and I represent 
Hanoi and I can tell you right off the bat we don't rec- 
ognize you southerners. Our chief wants a table of bam- 
boo in the shape of a huge sickle with space for machine- 
gun emplacements." 

HENRI: "Our union delegates are on their way over 
here. They're going to take a dim view of foreigners 
working here without official permits." 

DILLON: "Who do you think you are, telling an 
American carpenter — and a veteran at that — where he 
can work and where he can't work? One word from me 
and we'll throw a picket line around this dump. And 
after all we did for you at St. Lo." 

HENRI: "Don't you talk to me like that, you fathead. 
If it wasn't for Lafayette you patronizing Americans 
would still be a British colony." 

(The door opens and three Frenchmen, wearing hom- 
burgs and smoking Gauloises come in.) 

HENRI: "Ah. here are our delegates now." (In rapid 
French he explains the situation to the newcomers.) 

FIRST D: "The solution is quite simple. No one but 
a Frenchman can work in this country without special 
permission and without joining the union. You other guys 
start walking." 

DILLON: "Honest Ave is going to have a fit about 
this — and you Frenchmen are going to have to fight your 
own battles from now on. Meanwhile, until I hear from 
Sam Glutz in our home office I'm not budging." 

VC: "In my bag over there I have a small mortar and 
a few grenades. Make your move, you French pig, and 
I'll blow up the place." 

SECOND D: (Soothingly) "Come now, we don't want 
another international incident. We've had enough trouble 
with the sagging franc. Let's sit down like nice guys 
and talk this thing out." 

VC: (Grudgingly) "Well. okay. Since we're all car- 
penters under the skin let's put aside our sharpened chisels 
and our booby-trapped spirit levels and talk. But I must 
insist on selecting the shape of the bargaining table. . . ." 

Text by Phil Santora • Drawing by Bruce Sfark 




EDITOR'S NOTE: As we go to press on this Feb- 
ruary issue of The CARPENTER, the wire services re- 
port that agreement has been reached on the shape of 
the peace conference table. It will be. says an Asso- 
ciated Press report, round, with two small, rectangular 
tables at either side. The small, auxiliary tables will be 
18 inches away from the main conference table, at 
parallel positions on opposite sides of the main table. 
News reports are that. After nine weeks of haggling. 
French carpenters completed the conference tables in 
nine hours. 




For a Responsive Congress 

■ The opening days of the first session of the 91st Con- 
gress hold out the hope that the country's mood of im- 
patience and the search for positive change has found 
its way up to Capitol Hill. 

The election by party caucuses of Sen. Edward M. 
Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Sen. Hugh Scott (R-Pa.) as party 
whips was a bracing tonic for the liberal forces in the 
Senate and throughout the country. What it will pro- 
duce in terms of substantive and progressive legislation 
is still to be seen. But men of liberal persuasion in 
leadership posts is a definite gain for the nation. 

The challenge to the Electoral College system— spe- 
cifically the freedom of an elector to cast his vote as he 
pleases without regard to the popular vote in the state 
—also is a plus. Though the challenge went down to 
defeat it spotlighted a serious defect in the country's 
democratic electoral structure and renewed hopes for 
change and reform. 

The pay raise voted by the House for the office of 
the President and the strong likelihood of pay in- 
creases for members of Congress and high government 
officials is also a positive change for the better, for it 
will create a greater degree of financial independence 
and compensate public officials in terms of the respon- 
sibilities they shoulder. 

Upcoming is the continuing battle to amend the 
Senate's filibuster rule, to lessen the ability of a mi- 
nority to impede and block action on vital legislation 
supported by a majority of the Senate. 

On the House side the Republicans have in a sense 
brought new and younger men into leadership while 
the Democrats are moving towards making the con- 
gressional wing of the party perhaps more responsive 
to new approaches and ideas through monthly party 
caucuses. 

All this adds up to Congress responding mildly in a 
structural and party sense to the continuing need for 
change. There are obviously many more and deeper 
changes needed if the Congress is to respond in modern 
terms to the needs of our times. 

These changes involve a general legislative reorga- 
nization of Congress— the last major reorganization was 
effected in 1946; restoration of the 21 -day rule in the 
House Rules Committee; financing of presidential and 
other campaigns; reduction in the voting age; provi- 
sions for television debates. 

The 1968 elections produced only minor changes in 
the makeup of the 91st Congress in terms of its pred- 
ecessor. But Congress, despite its complex structures 
and traditions, is a responsive body and the opening 
days have indicated a change in tone— if not in sub- 
stance. 

The change is hopefully indicative that the liberal 
forces will be a mite better organized and better able 
to articulate their position as the legislative issues move 
onto center stage. 

In the continuing struggle with the conservative coali- 
tion any strengthening or improvement in the liberal 
bloc is a gain. ■ — Th* AFL-CIO news 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



11 



|^|Qanadian Report 



Joint Committee Backs Right to Refuse Unsafe Work 



TORONTO (CPA) — Employees 
should have the right to refuse to work 
under unsafe conditions, a labor-man- 
agement committee has recommended 
to the Ontario Government. 

This is one of 30 specific recom- 
mendations in a 102-page brief pre- 
pared by a group called the Joint Com- 
mittee on Construction Safety. Its 
member organizations are the Ontario 
Federation of Labor, the Provincial 
Building and Construction Trades 
Council of Ontario, the Toronto Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Council 
and the Construction Safety Associa- 
tion of Ontario. 

It was prepared for presentation to 
the Labor Safety Council of Ontario 
and Labor Minister Dalton Bales. The 
LSCO is a goverment-backed group 
with labor and management represent- 
atives. 

The brief grew out of a meeting of 
union representatives last May to dis- 
cuss failure to enforce the Construc- 
tion Safety Act. 

"They reported that workmen were 
having to resort to work stoppages, 
picketing and other similar means to 
protect themselves from injury while 
on the construction site," the brief 
said. 

What made the plan to prepare rec- 
ommendations a unique happening 
was the fact that the CSAO, a manage- 
ment-financed safety organization, en- 
thusiastically joined with the unionists 
in the job. 

One of their general conclusions 
was that enforcement was weak and 
the best rules in the world are useless 
without "competent well-regulated 
safety inspectors able to act efficiently 
and quickly." 

The specific recommendations fre- 
quently called for more careful spell- 
ing out of rules and regulations. They 
included: 

Provincial, in place of municipal, 
appointment and control of safety in- 
spectors under the Construction Safety 
Act and the Trench Excavators' Pro- 
tection Act. 

Power for the inspectors immediate- 
ly upon non-compliance with a stop- 
work order, to go to a court for a court 
order. 



Improved salaries for inspectors and 
their selection on the basis of formal 
training, experience and education. 

A requirement that each construc- 
tor call together his staff to point out 
potential hazards and to hold regular 
on-the-job safety meetings. 

U.S. Takes 67% of 
Canada's '68 Exports 

(CPA) — The experts are forecasting 
that 1969 will be another good year 
for Canada. 

In 1968 the gross national product 
(GNP — the sum total of goods and 
services produced) reached $67 bil- 
lion, an eight per cent increase over 
1967. In 1969 it is expected to go 
over the 72 billion mark. 

If this occurs, the GNP will have 
doubled since 1960. But the net in- 
crease in GNP will be about 55 per 
cent. The rest would be due to in- 
creased prices. 

Of the eight per cent increase in 
GNP last year, about 4.5 per cent was 
a net increase — the rest was due to 
price increases. 

Canada's trade position also showed 
a substantial improvement in 1968. 
Exports went up 18 per cent, imports 
only 1 3 per cent. A large part of this 
improvement was due to increased 
sales to the United States. Last year, 
the U.S. took 67 per cent of this coun- 
try's exports. 

It is expected that this year exports 
will again increase to the U.S., Japan 
and Germany, but decline to France 
and Great Britain. 

Boom conditions in the United 
States, therefore, have helped Canada 
considerably. The U.S. GNP went up 
9 per cent. The U.S. consumer price 
index went up 4.6 per cent. Average 
weekly wages in manufacturing were 
up 7.2 per cent. 

Canadian figures were similar. The 
price index went up 4.3 per cent in 
1 968. Average wages in manufactur- 
ing were up 7.9 per cent. 

Business investment in Canada is 
expected to rise in 1 969 by about 8 
per cent compared with two per cent 
in 1968. This is in part at least evi- 
dence that business profits have been 
good and are getting better. 



One of the main problems in Can- 
ada is unemployment. Even with the 
economy booming, unemployment 
across the country averaged 4.9 per 
cent in 1968, with no assurance that 
it won't go higher this year. 

In the United States, the unemploy- 
ment rate was only 3.6 per cent in 
1968, may go up to around 4 or 4.5 
per cent in 1969. 

The trouble with average unemploy- 
ment figures is that all parts of the 
country are not "average" — some are 
above average like Ontario, others are 
well below average like the Atlantic 
provinces. 

Hamilton Arranges 
Conference on Poverty 

Two conferences on poverty are be- 
ing held by two federations of labor. 

On February 1 5th and 1 6th. the 
Ontario Federation of Labor is hold- 
ing a conference in Niagara Falls on 
"A Just Society — what is it?". Key- 
note speaker will be Reuben Baetz, 
Executive Director of the Canadian 
Welfare Council and probably the 
foremost authority on poverty and 
welfare programs in Canada. 

His speech will be followed by four 
discussion groups on Poverty. Hous- 
ing, Human Rights and Taxation, each 
dealing with a special aspect of the 
poverty problem and related issues. 

The conference arrangements were 
made by OFL Secretary-Treasurer D. 
F. Hamilton, a member of the Car- 
penters' Union. 

The other poverty conference is be- 
ing held March 1 5th and 1 6th in Sas- 
katoon by the Saskatchewan Federa- 
tion of Labor. 

Keynote speaker will be Russell 
Bell, now an economist with the Eco- 
nomic Council of Canada, formerly 
with the Canadian Labor Congress. 

The conference will include as dele- 
gates people who themselves are suffer- 
ing from poverty — members of the 
Indian-Metis community, old age pen- 
sioners and others. 

Average Toronto House 
Goes Over $30,000 Mark 

In the Metro Toronto area of about 
two million people, average cost of a 
house, either new or used, went over 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



the $30,000 mark at the end of last 
year. 

The actual selling price of a house 
averaged $30,492, an increase of $2,- 
000 in one year. 

Only families earning over $10,000 
a year can or should buy a home at 
this price. 

Architect Comments 
On Construction 

A major research effort in the con- 
struction field is being conducted by 
the Metro Toronto School Board under 
architect Roderick Robbie. Called a 
Study of Educational Facilities, the 
project is investigating "systems build- 
ing" which could, he estimates, open 
the way to international construction 
contracts worth billions. 

Bids have actually been received on 
the main components of a whole 
school-building program of completely 
flexible interior design. 

Mr. Robbie says that the building 
industry is the sleeping giant of North 
America. He looks forward to the 
establishment of a huge Canadian 
corporation owned 40 per cent by the 
federal government. 30 per cent by 
Canadian corporations and 30 per cent 
by individual Canadian investors. 

He is a severe critic of present build- 
ing practices in this country. 

"While the building industry is one 
of the foundations of Canada's eco- 
nomy," he says, "it is riddled with the 
maggots of speculation and financial 
brinkmanship. In playing Russian 
roulette with our means of providing 
shelter, we play the same game with 
the very essence of our social struc- 
ture. 

"Federal, provincial and municipal 
levels of government, as if possessed 
by an insatiable desire to symbolically 
reduce the building industry from the 
human level to the animal level, and 
finally to the vegetable level, assail the 
industry with a barrage of building, 
fire, health, labor, planning, smoke 
pollution and other codes, tax and 
fiscal regulations, laws, statutes, ordi- 
nances, rules, requirements and pure 
pettifoggery that would have caused a 
less red-blooded industry to succumb 
50 years ago." 

Brave words from a knowledgable, 
probing man. 

New Brunswick Acts 
On Public Emptoyees 

The labor leaders in the province of 
New Brunswick have welcomed new 
legislation providing collective bargain- 
ing for public employees with the 



right to strike for all workers except 
those in essential services. 

The legislation was based on a re- 
port by Professor Saul Frankel of Mc- 
Gill University who recommended the 
right to strike. 

However, the minister of labor ex- 
cepted "essential services." He did not 
define those considered essential but 
said that the law was passed as it was 
"in order to ensure that the health, 
safety and security of the province is 
maintained. 

Canadian Steel 
High in Profits 

One of Canada's big three steel com- 
panies says that the industry will con- 
tinue to be a world leader in profita- 
bility. 

Based on 1967 results, profit as a 
percentage of sales in Canada was 8.7 
compared with 4.9 in the United 
States, 2.8 in Japan and 0.3 per cent 
in West Germany. 

Canadian steel workers will be go- 
ing for parity wages with U.S. workers 
this year. Some already have it. 

Nation's Railways 
In Early Contract 

For the first time ever, Canada's 
major railways signed a two-year con- 
tract with their non-operating em- 
ployees before the expiration of the 
old agreement. 

Federal mediator W. P. Kelly, a 
former railway union official, was 
given a large share of the credit by 
Federal Labor Minister Bryce Mac- 
kasey. 

HO To Mark 
Its 50th Year 

Canada will have one of the best 
programs in the world to mark the 
50th anniversary of the International 
Labor Organization this year. 

The federal department of labor ar- 
ranged a special tripartite meeting of 
management and union officials and 
provincial deputy ministers of labor 
which considered ways and means to 
commemorate the occasion. 

The Canadian group discussed an 
IL.O commemorative stamp, special 
articles in union and management pub- 
lications, radio and TV shows and 
travelling displays. These and other 
ideas were endorsed. 

The ILO is the only international 
organization where delegates from la- 
bor and management meet on an equal 
basis with government. 



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THE WORK 

CLOTHES 

THAT 

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Union-made by craftsmen for 
craftsmen, Lee Carpenters' Overalls 
have maximum convenience, com- 
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"World's Largest Manufacturer 
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FEBRUARY, 1969 



13 



Double-Clawed Hammer 
Draws Reader Interest 



Are You Familiar With This Hammer? 




Recently, a collector of old carpentry tools at Northeastern Oklahoma 
A & M College ran across the hammer pictured above. To date, he has been 
unable to learn what special purpose the hammer was used for. Can any 
old-timer help him out? 



This was our announcement of Mr. Cheney's query in the December CARPENTER. 



■ When Merrill Chaney, woodwork 
instructor of Northeastern Okla- 
homa A.&M. College, sent in a pic- 
ture of a two-headed hammer and 
a query about it. he started a chain 
reaction among our readers which 
proved considerable. 

A large number of people wrote 
in to answer his query, printed in 
last December's issue: "Are you fa- 
miliar with this hammer?" In addi- 
tion to those who submitted what 
apparently is the right conclusion, 
based on the overwhelming consen- 
sus of replies, there were other re- 
actions. 

Brother Humorist 

Martin Supilowski, Jr., Chicago, 
refused to take the hammer seri- 
ously. He cast the hammer in the 
same frame of reference as the left- 
handed wrench, the bucket of steam 
and the can of polka-dot paint. He 
also suggested the two-pronged 
screw (shown on Page 30) for those 
who want to speed up joinery. 

Actually, the two-headed hammer 
is a home-made adaptation of the 
principal embodied in the old-time 
"Shaker" hammer. This hammer is 
contained in the Shaker Museum 
in New York State, and is listed and 
illustrated in the book A Museum 



Editor, The Carpenter 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W. 

Washington, D.C. 20001 

Dear Sir: 

I am collecting old woodwork- 
ing tools for a museum in my 
woodworking shop. 

Enclosed find a picture of a 
hammer I recently found. I would 
appreciate whatever information 
you might be able to furnish as 
to date manufactured, by whom, 
etc. 

Also, I have many other tools 
I would like some data on as I 
am writing a short history of each 
tool and labeling them. 

Again, may I say I will appre- 
ciate whatever information you 
may be able to furnish. 
Yours truly. 
Merrill Chaney 
Woodwork Instructor 
Division of Technology 
Northeastern Oklahoma 

A & M College 
Miami. Oklahoma 74354 



The letter from the Oklahoman which 
sought information about the hammer. 

of Early American Tools by histo- 
rian Eric Sloane. It is also shown 
in Ancient Carpenters' Tools by 
Henry C. Mercer. 

The head of the Shaker hammer 
was cast with two sets of claws and 



one head. The hammer illustrated 
in the December issue was made by 
putting two ordinary heads on one 
hammer handle and removing one 
of the heads. As far as can be ascer- 
tained, no modern tool manufac- 
turer makes a "Shaker" hammer. 

There were many valid uses for 
the double-headed hammer. Its basic 
function, of course, was to pull the 
larger nails. The carpenter would 
start with the claws at the end of 
the hammer and pull the nail part- 
way up. Then he would engage the 
secondary claws and the end head 
would then function much as a block 
of wood placed under an ordinary 
single-headed hammer. 

In addition to the primary pur- 
pose, there were secondary bene- 
fits: 

In driving large nails, the added 
weight of the second head proved 
of value. 

In pulling nails, if the carpenter 
did it properly, the nail came out 
straight and undamaged, then could 
be used again. This was of consid- 
erably more importance in past 
periods when nails were relatively 
much more expensive than today. 

If a nail was pulled with the 
double-headed tool, it came straight 
out and left a much smaller hole to 
be refinished if such was necessary. 

There's Another Use 

Whenever nails were to be set 
and the carpenter could not use both 
hands, he could place a nail's shank 
between the upper claws with the 
head against the primary claws, then 
set it by driving the point into the 
wood. He could then release the 
nail, turn the hammer around and 
drive it home in the customary man- 
ner. 

The hammer was also used for 
drawing barbed wire tight when 
erecting fences. The fence builder 
would put the wire between the 
upper claws, then hook into the 
fencepost's surface with the lower 
claws and use the leverage which 
resulted to pull the wire taut. He 
would either take a half-turn around 
the post with the slack end of the 
wire to hold it in place while he 
stapled it or have a co-worker sta- 
ple it while he held it taut. 

Continued on Page 30 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



OF INTEREST TO OUR INDUSTRIAL LOCALS 



Health, Welfare, and Pension Plans Lag 
In Furniture, Lumber, Wood Products 

Multi-Shop Agreements Hold Promise in Some areas 



■ In 1948, 2.7 million workers were 
covered by negotiated contracts 
which had provisions for health and 
welfare plans. That represented 
about 18% of the workers working 
under negotiated agreements in that 
year. Eighteen years later, in 1966, 
16.1 million or 91% were covered 
by health and welfare provisions of 
negotiated agreements. This was an 
increase of almost 600% . 

In the same period of time, nego- 
tiated retirement plans increased al- 
most 1400%. In 1948 there were 
only about 1.7 million workers 
(11%) covered by negotiated retire- 
ment plans as compared to 13.5 mil- 
lion in 1966 or 76%. 

As health and welfare plans have 
become more common-place, union 
negotiators have sought to enlarge 
and extend existing coverage by 
eliminating or decreasing employee 
contributions, raising the benefit 
payments, and increasing the length 
of benefit payments to the worker 
and the extension of benefit coverage 
to retired workers. Negotiators have 
also sought to make plans more com- 
prehensive and provide greater cov- 
erage to the worker. For example, 
they have negotiated vision and den- 
tal packages and, to a lesser degree, 
psychiatric care and prescription 
drugs. Indications are that we will 
see rapid growth in the extension of 
these new benefits to existing health 
and welfare programs. 

Negotiators have also sought im- 



provements and liberalization of 
existing retirement plans. The trend 
here has been to lower or eliminate 
the contribution of the worker, en- 
large pension benefits, provide im- 
proved benefits for disabled workers 
and earlier retirement benefits. There 
is also a trend to negotiate less ardu- 
ous and restrictive eligibility re- 
quirement. 

In the All-Manufacturing Indus- 
try, 80 to 85 percent of the workers 
under union contracts have retire- 
ment coverage, and 90 to 95 per- 
cent have health and welfare cov- 
erage. 

In the Furniture, Lumber, and 
Wood Products Industry, 70 to 75 
percent of the workers are covered 
by pension provisions of their agree- 
ments, and 85 to 90 percent are 
covered by negotiated health and 
welfare programs. 

These figures indicate that we are 
not keeping up with other industries. 
However, there are many reasons for 
our lagging behind in these fringe 
benefits. 

The first factor is the make-up of 
our industry. The vast majority of 
our brothers and sisters work in 
small shops of under 20 people. Pen- 
sion programs are especially difficult 
to establish because of cost and other 
factors when the number of people 
involved is small. For those indus- 
tries which have large numbers of 
workers in one factorv, such as the 
auto, steel and rubber industries, the 



establishment of a pension plan is 
a relatively simple matter when com- 
pared to small and scattered shops. 

One way to help the small, scat- 
tered shops is consolidation; that is 
the combining of many shops under 
one plan. The idea of a multi-em- 
ployer plan has met with great suc- 
cess in large metropolitan areas 
where the employees of many small 
shops are covered by one central 
plan. The same theory can be ap- 
plied to the shops in rural areas. 
This would, in many cases, mean a 
larger geographic area than those 
that exist in the metropolitan areas. 
However, this would be in keeping 
with the United Brotherhood's in- 
dustrial program of like conditions, 
in like industries, in like economic 
areas. 

Another reason for the lag is that 
most of the negotiated plans prior 
to 1948 were in industries which 
have grown tremendously, such as 
autos and rubber. Therefore, most 
of the workers coming into these in- 
dustries came under the scope of 
existing plans. 

There are other factors which re- 
strict the creation of and the im- 
provement of health and welfare 
plans and pension programs which 
are not limited to the Lumber and 
Wood Products Industry. In some 
industries and in some geographic 
areas, the level of wage rales are 
so low and the negotiated increases 
are so small the workers feel that it 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



15 



is more beneficial to them to take 
their increases in their base pay 
rather than set aside a portion for 
pension or health and welfare pro- 
grams. 

Also, the lack of interest by the 
membership hampers negotiators 
from creating such plans and on 
improving such plans. Many mem- 
bers, especially those under 30, do 
not see the need for pension plans, 
nor do many without families see 
the need for health and welfare pro- 
grams. They don't stop to realize 
the advantages of early investment. 




Certainly each of these factors 
have helped produce the gulf that 
exists between our industry and 
others where fringe benefits are con- 
cerned. However, now that the lag 
has been recognized and the reasons 
for it isolated, we can now map our 
strategy for narrowing this gulf. 

It will not be easy nor is there 
likely to be immediate visible evi- 
dence of success, but, hopefully, in 
the near future all of our members 
will enjoy the protection offered by 
negotiated health and welfare plans 
and pension plans. 



LABOR NEWS BRIEFS 



Shultz Throws Cold Water on 
Anti-Labor Plans in Congress 

The carefully nurtured anti-labor proposals of conserva- 
tives, including the labor court and compulsory arbitration, 
are not going to find favor with the new Secretary of Labor, 
George P. Shultz. 

Shultz picked his own confirmation hearing, before the 
Senate Labor and Public Welfare Committee, to express his 
views. 

Making his debut as chairman of the committee was Sen- 
ator Ralph Yarborough (D. Tex.). Senator George Murphy 
(R. Calif.) and other conservatives presented some of their 
pet anti-labor proposals at the hearing and asked for Shultz's 
comments. 

"Free collective bargaining is a better system for handling 
labor disputes than an imposed settlement," he said. 

Murphy, who said that for 20 years he had favored a 
labor court — which unions strongly opposed — as a means of 
"avoiding wasteful stoppages," asked for Shultz's views. 

"I would move very slowly on any labor court system," 
Shultz replied, "I would lean very heavily on the system of 
free collective bargaining that we now have." 

In other answers to Committee questions, Shultz gave no 
comfort to anti-labor forces that seek enactment of repres- 
sive legislation to deal with national emergency strikes. "I 
would approach that question very cautiously," Shultz said. 
"I would be careful about recommending legislation that 
might have a logical appeal but might have broad implica- 
tions in other fields. If you're not careful you may legislate 
something for an immediate problem that will have an un- 
necessary effect in an area where collective bargaining has 
been working well; and in most areas collective bargaining 
is working well." 

Non Union Worker's Wife 
Recounts Husband's Trials 

Union members who take their union for granted should 
meet Mrs. Robert W. Farmer of Louisville. Kentucky. 

Mrs. Farmer's husband was not fortunate enough to be a 
union member and she's bitter over the treatment he received. 
She felt so strongly about it that she wrote a letter to The 
Louisville Courier-Journal telling "why I believe in unions." 

Following is her letter: 

"Would you be interested to know why I believe in unions? 

"In 1922 at the age of 14, my husband went to work as 
a bicycle delivery boy for a small optical firm. He grew in 
knowledge, as well as years, and it wasn't long before he 
was a lens grinder. In the meantime, the company grew 
enough that they hired another lens grinder. Many years 
passed under these conditions, and about two years ago the 
other lens grinder became ill. His case was diagnosed as 



lung cancer, and after several months he died. He had been 
with the firm 31 years. 

"After his death, the entire load of the shop was thrown 
on my husband. To the very best of our knowledge, no 
attempt was ever made to replace the man who had passed 
away. My husband was going to work earlier and earlier and 
staying later and later. It was always a 12-hour day for him, 
sometimes 13, even 14. But those blessed glasses had to be 
gotten out at all cost. I can remember just two one-week 
vacations in 18 years. 

"The first week of October, after 46 years with the com- 
pany, my husband had a stroke. He is a very sick man. 

"They let him go — dismissed him, fired him, or however 
you want to put it. There was no severance pay. no retire- 
ment pay after all those years. Just pay for that week. 

"That's why I believe in unions." 

Glass Door Injuries Mount 
But FHA Denies "Serious Risk" 

Sliding glass door accidents in American homes cause ap- 
proximately 100.000 injuries a year — many of them fatal. But 
these tragedies have not yet convinced the Federal Housing 
Administration that there is enough of a "serious risk" to 
demand that home-builders use tempered safety glass to with- 
stand the impact of people crashing into the doors. 

An FHA official testifying before the National Commis- 
sion on Product Safety told the angry commissioners that 
"there is no clear evidence of serious risks of accidents" with 
sliding doors made of ordinary glass, so long as they are 
equipped with horizontal dividing bars. The FHA, he said, 
cannot impose "additional costs" on home-builders by re- 
quiring the special glass. The additional costs turned out to 
$7 to $10 per door, but an industry spokesman from the 
Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association said the 
extra cost is actually only $5 to $7 per door. 

Commission Chairman Arnold B. Elkind asked FHA archi- 
tect Wynford K. Snell. "Do you feel that it's incumbent upon 
people to sacrifice their lives and present the evidence to you 
before you move?" 

In contrast to Snell's cool testimony was the terrible evi- 
dence presented by parents whose children were killed or 
permanently scarred in accidents with ordinary glass door 
panels. 

A spokesman from the AFL-CIO Building and Construc- 
tion Trades Department joined in the criticism of the FHA 
and told PAI that specifications should require "the safest 
possible glass — one that would be the most shatter-proof." 

He pointed out that construction workers are protected 
against glass accidents on job sites because all glass is marked 
with huge white "x's." "One businessman once accused the 
unions of requiring the markings in order to make more work 
for the laborers who clean off the 'x's'," he recalled. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 



A Statement of Labor Contract, Vintage 1914 



■ Recently, Brother Edward T. An- 
dreassen, business agent of Local 
Union 787, Brooklyn, New York, 
forwarded to THE CARPENTER 
the Statement of Labor Contract re- 
produced on this page. 

For the benefit of those whose 
memories do not go back 55 years, 
this document should make inter- 
esting reading. 

The contract shows that wages 
were 35 to 40 cents per hour and 
the workday consisted of nine hours. 
At the top rate of 40 cents per hour, 
this amounted to $3.60 per day. The 
contract also shows that man had 
to pay his own fare to the jobsite 
in Cohoes, New York. 

What the contract does not show 
is the fee the man had to pay the 
employment agency. At best it prob- 
ably amounted to half a week's pay 
and at worst a full week's pay. 

For those who enjoy today's 
wages and working conditions it 
must be obvious that considerable 
progress has been made by the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America in the past 
55 years. 

It is interesting to note that the 
workslip was printed in German, 
Polish, Hungarian, Slovak, Swed- 
ish and Italian, as well as English. 

In the year 1914 immigration was 
practically unrestricted. Thousands 
of mechanics from European na- 
tions were entering the United 
States each month. Poor, largely 
friendless, and unacquainted with 
the English language, they easily 
fell prey to all sorts of unscrupulous 
operators who were not above ex- 
ploiting their fellowman. 

It was in this sort of an atmos- 
phere that the United Brotherhood 
struggled valiantly to bring order 
out of chaos and to establish decent 
wages and working conditions for 
those who followed the trade of car- 
pentry. What carpenters enjoy to- 
day traces back directly to those 
efforts. 

Fifty-five years is a relatively 

short period. Many of our members 

Continued on Pugc 27 



S. J. Atwood's Employment Agency 

12 STATE STREET, NEW YORK 



STATEMENT of LABOR CONTRACT 

in accordance with Chapter 700 of the Laws »f 1910. 



Name of Employer 
Name des StellnDgagfthbataa 
Iroie T>rAcvrta}f,eoeo 
Alkalmaxaat ado nere 
Pracu. dajneebo neno 
Nsmi af arbetagifvaren 
Nome del padrone 



Coho9s Company 



Address of Employer 
Adresze des Stellaa^B^ebendaa 
Adres pracydajacsgo 
Alkalmaz&at ado czime 
Pracu dojuceho adresia 
Adres* af arbetagifTaren 
Direzione del padrone 



Cohoes E.Y. 



Name 0! Employei 
Same des Angostellten 
lime robotnika 
Al^alnjaiott neve 
«obotnikow me no 
Narnn af arbetetagaran 
Nome del Lavorante 



&£■**-*<>■ * £X. Jk 



Addreaa of Employeo 
Adraesfl des AngeetollttK 
Adrea robotnika 
Alkalmazott czjme 
Robotnikow adreasa 
Adress af arbetatagaren 
Direzione del Lavorant* 



Nature of work to be performed 

Art der anszufuhrendan Arbait 

Jaka Dracs 

A mnnka minose'zo 

Jaka robots. 

Det arbete 10m ikall atfdixs 

Specie di Laroro 



_f^- /^^ S3*&~ 



Carpenter on Concrete forms. 



Houra ot Labor 

Aniahl der ArbaitBitanda» 

[loic godzin robociyca 

Munka or&k iz&ma 

Kelo hodini robit 

Arbetvtimrsarne 

Ore di Laroro 



Wagca eff-flred 
Ang-ibotener Loan 
Jaka placa 

Felajanlott «mnkabe> 
Kelo placu 

Den Ion tom arbjodea 
Paga offert* 



Destination of the persons e=ipl»y«4 

Bentimisuneiort der Angea'.elltea 

Miejsce przyxnacxoon do roboty 

\i ■llcalnwzottak killdettsi helya 

Dzs je poaelanim 

DeaMnationen af de anitillda p»rif»n»faa 

Deationiinoe delle perior.e irapiojate 



Term; of Tr^niportation 

Traoaport-Badiagungea 

Warunki jardy 

Szallitaai Mtetelek 

Jak budil doj]kd« 

Villkoren f5r darai rraniportaricf 

Condizione di Tiaggio 



Remarks 
Anaierkangaa 

Marjsgyieaek 

Poinanka 
Ann arknin; 
Oaisrvazionl 



jxr 



9 hours per day 



35 to 40 Gen's per hour 



Cohc.93 N.Y. 



Paid 07m fare 



If more than one person is enja^e 1, list of namos anJ addresses will be found attached. 

New York,.... J .^.?...??th 191 4 

EnjlUh. Cerninn, Polish, Hungarian, Slovak Swedish, [tnlian 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



17 



Willi i 




TILE BACKER BOARD TIPS 

Installation tips and architectural spec- 
ifications for water resistant gypsum tile 
backer board, designed for bath, kitchen 
and other high-moisture areas, are in- 
cluded in a new illustrated brochure 
published by Georgia-Pacific, one of the 
major gypsum products manufacturers. 

The "Tile Backer Board" brochure is 
available free by writing to: Ronald 
Perdew, Inquiry Manager. Georgia-Pa- 
cific Corp., Box 311, Portland, Ore. 
97207. 

Drawings illustrate construction tech- 
niques for installing tile backer board 
in bathtub and shower areas, including 
the simple method of protecting pipe 
cut-outs in damp area walls. 

TRAILER FOR PALLETS 




"If the load fits a pallet, we can pull 
it" ... is the way Hawk Bilt Corp. of 
Vinton, Iowa, summarizes the versatility 
of their new Hydraulic Fork Trailer. 
Pallets of material up to 5,000 pounds 
can be hauled behind a small pickup 
truck at highway speeds. 

The trailer is specifically designed to 
help businesses handling the many mate- 
rials now being shipped on pallets. By 
inserting wood cross braces, the trailer 
will also handle many non-palletized 
loose materials such as lumber, lawn and 
turf equipment, brick and tile, cement 
blocks, sacked feed and fertilizer, sacked 
cement, plywood and fiber board, fruit 
from orchards, and compact tractors. 
Loads of approximately 4-ft. wide by 
up to 12-ft. long can be readily trans- 
ported. Hawk Bilt anticipates many other 
uses as the trailer becomes familiar to 
the public. 

Heavy-duty welds with 12 ga. steel 



construction throughout, allows the trailer 
to take the punishment of travel over 
rough terrain, according to Hawk Bilt. 
They also explain that independently 
operated hydraulic pumps allow the 
trailer forks to be raised and lowered 
simultaneously or separately. This facili- 
tates easy loading and unloading on al- 
most any terrain. 

To load, 2 x 4's are placed on edge 
under a pallet. Allow about 10 inches 
from the edges for cradle fork clearance. 
Then back the unit under the pallet. 
Unloading is handled in the same man- 
ner. For more information write: Sales 
Manager, Hawk Bilt Corp., Vinton, 
Iowa. 

LAMINATED LOCK-DECK 




Lock-Deck, product of Potlatch For- 
ests, Inc., now is available in new patterns 
and textures. Lock-Deck is laminated 
from three or more boards with center 
board offset to form tongue one side and 
end groove on other. Decking is manu- 
factured in nominal 6" and 8" widths. 
Illustrated are four of the many surface 
patterns. Patterns shown are. top: stri- 
ated; standard; half-oval and saw-textured 
channel groove. All species except South- 
ern Pine are available in exclusive Pot- 
latch Colorific finish in natural and seven 
colorful tints or 36 distinctive semi-trans- 
parent stains. Lock-Deck substantially re- 
duces labor and finishing costs. Write for 
brochure: Potlatch Forests. Inc.. P.O. Box 
359 IP, San Francisco, California 94119. 

POWER SUPPLY, STARTER 




DUAL POWER provides low cost 
reliable D.C. electric power from any 
motor vehicle to run drills, saws, pipe 
threaders, soldering irons and any appli- 
ances with brush-type motors. 

There are no mechanical changes and 
no belts, pulleys, or mounting brackets 
to contend with. The pictured unit mounts 
under the dashboard and a heavy duty 



solenoid mounts under the hood. Total 
installation time is about 30 minutes. 

In addition to being capable of run- 
ning most power hand tools, DUAL 
POWER will "fast charge" a battery in 
another vehicle (road grader, tractor, 
diesel, etc.) in a matter of minutes. Par- 
ticularly valuable during the cold months, 
this will normally be sufficient to start 
off road equipment in less than 5 min- 
utes even on the coldest days. 

A PEDAL-PUSHER is included with 
each unit to permit one person to readily 
control output voltage and operate the 
tools in use. 

The DUAL POWER is the result of 
two years experience with power con- 
verters of this type and incorporates spe- 
cial solid state protective circuits and 
heavy duty switching for long and trouble 
free service. Priced at $79.50. Write: 
TECHSONICS, P.O. Box 251, El Prado, 
New Mexico 87529. 

PERSPECTIVE BOARD 

Modulux Division, United States Gyp- 
sum Company, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, 
announces the Designer model of the 
Klok Perspective Drawing Board. As the 
name signifies, this board was created to 
fit in the middle area between use appli- 
cation of the Professional and Standard 
models. It is 28" x 39" x %" and does 
all that can be done on the Standard 
model. It accommodates paper up to 28" 
for larger projects or more detail using 
larger scale. A building up to 200' x 200' 
can be drawn using the Vs." to 1" scale. 
Accurate perspectives can be drawn from 
rough layouts, preliminary blueprints, or 
early sketches without a scaled or de- 




tȣ7 



tailed plan. Since no tracing is involved, 
time can be saved working immediately 
on opaque drawing paper. 

The new Designer board is of s /s" 
Fiberesin, a solid plastic panel in a nat- 
ural tan birch wood grain pattern with a 
light reflectance of 40-50% — considered 
ideal for work surfaces. The board is 
warp-free with an unusually high resist- 
ance to abrasion, scratching and staining. 
Charts, scales, etc., are impregnated into 
the board so they will never fade or erase. 

The complete kit includes perspective 
drawing board, specially designed 31" 
T-square, vanishing point pins, and an 
easy-to-follow instruction manual. The 
kit sells for $95 F.O.B., Oconomowoc, 
Wisconsin. 

For additional information and free 
catalog, contact Warren Hille, Modulux 
Division, United States Gypsum Com- 
pany, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin 53066. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Report on the 

International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest Committee Meeting 

November 1-2, 1968, Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois 

Plans Shaping Up for Major Competition in Chicago Next August 



MINUTES 
CALL TO ORDER 

The meeting was called to order by 
Chairman Ed Wasielewski. 

ROLL CALL 

Committee members present: 
Ed Wasielewski. Chairman, Associated 
General Contractors of America, Inc., 
Phoenix. Arizona; Leo Gable, Secretary. 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, Washington, D. C; 
Syd Carnine. National Association of 
Home Builders. Los Angeles, California; 
Charles Sanford, United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Los 
Angeles, California; Stuart Proctor, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, Detroit, Michigan; 
Richard Hutchinson, Associated General 
Contractors of America, Inc., Seattle, 
Washington; Paul Rudd, United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America. Tacoma, Washington. 

George Vest, Chicago Joint Appren- 
ticeship Committee. 

Committee members absent: 

Lee Rice, Associated General Contrac- 
tors of America. Inc.. Washington, D. C; 
Peter Christensen. United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Ed- 
monton, Alberta, Canada; R. K. Gervin, 
Amalgamated Construction Association 
of British Columbia, Vancouver, British 
Columbia, Canada. 

Chairman Wasielewski opened the 
meeting stating that there had been pre- 
liminary investigative meeting to obtain 
information relative to possible sites and 
facilities for the 1969 International Con- 
test. 

George Vest reported that the respec- 
tive managers of the Chicago Chapters 
of the Associated General Contractors of 
America, Inc., and the Home Builders 
and he representing the Chicago District 
Council of Carpenters, had begun plan- 
ning those activities that would be per- 
formed by the Chicago Joint Apprentice- 
ship Committee. 

They have arranged with Mayor Daley 
to have the contest week declared Ap- 
prenticeship Week. In addition, tele- 
vision and radio stations have promised 
live coverage of the contest; the news- 
papers have been contacted for releases. 
Further, as soon as the contest committee 
advises them of the equipment and mate- 
rials needed for the contest, the local 
committee will start contacting local deal- 
ers encouraging participation in the con- 
test. The local Joint Apprenticeship and 



Training Committee is also planning a 
ladies activities schedule. 

The Secretary reported that he, Mr. 
Allan, Chairman of the National Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Committee, 
and Mr. Vest, had met on two previous 
occasions and investigated the possibili- 
ties of facilities, and found none that 
compared, or for that matter, included 
the many possibilities offered by the Con- 
rad Hilton Hotel. 

There is available to the committee un- 
der one roof at the Conrad Hilton: 

1. Adequate manipulative contest space 
allowing a minimum of 20' x 20' 
for each contestant. Each contest- 
ant would have his own power 
source located in a column which 
would eliminate the criticism levied 
at the Kansas City contest of hav- 
ing power lines and junction boxes 
on the floor in the contest area. 
However, in order to accommodate 
the expected increase in the number 
of contestants in each category, for 
the 1969 contest, it would be neces- 
sary to use two separate, but equal, 
areas on the lower level, connected 
by two large openings. Escalators 
and stairways connect the proposed 
contest area to the main lobby area. 

2. 300 guest rooms at a confirmed rate 
of $14.00 per single and $19.00 per 
double. 

3. Adequate rooms for committee 
meetings and written tests for con- 
testants. 

4. Banquet rooms with facilities to 
handle 1000 or more for the awards 
banquet. 

5. Coffee shops and restaurants ade- 
quate to care for all. 

6. Facilities to serve separate lunches 
to contestants and judges during the 
contest. 

The committee adjourned to tour the 
contest area and banquet facilities with 
Mr. Flatery, Assistant to the Sales Man- 
ager, Mr. Thomas Fricke. 

They found that the contest area, al- 
though two separate but connected areas, 
would adequately handle the anticipated 
number of contestants. 

The International Ballroom or the 
Grand Ballroom would be ideal for the 
awards banquet. 

The Committee then reconvened in 
regular session and after much discussion 
they agreed that the contest area would 
be adequate providing that flood lights 
were installed in one of the areas to pro- 
vide sufficient lighting. This will create 



no problem, in that overhead electrical 
raceways are already in place and it 
would be just a matter of plugging in the 
overhead flood lights. 

The problem of providing accurately 
detailed manipulative project plans that 
could be completed by all contestants in 
the eight hours allocated was discussed. 
The secretary was instructed to survey all 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittees and Directors or Coordinators for 
ideas and suggestions on manipulative 
project plans, requesting that their sug- 
gestions be accompanied with a rough 
drawing of the suggested projects so that 
the contest committee may select and de- 
velop final plans. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that a table saw and jointer should be 
provided for each Mill-Cabinet contestant 
provided they were available and could 
be obtained. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that all contestants would be required to 
furnish their own overalls; however, the 
style and color would be that normally 
worn in their own community. No nail 
aprons or nail bags "ill be permitted. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that judges should wear identifying cloth- 
ing and badges, preferably white shop 
coats and should be relieved of the re- 
sponsibility to assist the contestants in the 
holding or raising of materials or project 
sections during the contest. 

It was moved, seconded, and carried 
that assistants to the contestants should 
be selected, one for each four contestants. 
These to be selected from members of 
the International Contest Committee, the 
National Joint Committee. International 
Representatives assigned to attend the 
contest and, if needed, from Management 
and labor Representatives present, with 
the provision that no assistant would be 
assigned to assist a contestant from his 
own province or state. 

It was moved, seconded and carried, 
that contestants would be supplied with 
a minimum tool list required for the 
manipulative project to which they were 
assigned, excluding, however, patented 
rafter cutting scales, rafter (ahles and 
hooks or manuals that would give cutting 
and assembly instructions. Each con- 
testant may bring and use any tool he 
deems necessary. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that a schedule of events be prepared for 
distribution at the time participants and 
contestants register. 

Continued on Page 20 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



19 




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Contest Committee Minutes 

Continued from Page 19 

Other subjects coming before this com- 
mittee, not being within their province, 
were referred to the National Carpenters 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittee meeting scheduled for January 31 
and February 1, 1968 at Miami Beach. 
Florida. Among these: 

1 . The number and amount of cash 
awards. 

2. Financing of the 1969 contest. 

3. Procedures for registration. 

4. Cut-off date for purchase of award 
banquet tickets. 

It was moved, seconded and carried 
that the facilities of the Conrad Hilton 
Hotel be utilized for the 1969 Interna- 
tional Apprenticeship Contest and that 
the Secretary be instructed to finalize 
plans and to commit the committee to 
the Hotel management to assure reserva- 
tions during the week of August 11, 1969. 
This was done and the following schedule 
has been tentatively set. subject to the 
approval of the National Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee at 
Miami Beach. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 1969 

A. Closed meeting of National Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittee. 

B. Reg stration of contestants and ar- 
riving committeemen. 

THURSD4Y, AUGUST 14, 1969 

A. Manipulative contest for Mill-Cabi- 
net and Millwright contestants. 

B. Wrilten test for Carpenters. 

C. Registration continued. 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 15, 1969 

A. Manipulative contest for Carpen- 
ters. 

B. Written test for Mill-Cabinet and 
Millwright contestants. 

C. Registration continued. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16, 1969 

A. Morning — Open session of National 
Joint Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee. 

B. Afternoon — Executive session of 
National Joint Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee. 

C. Awards banquet. 

TIME AND PLACE OF NEXT 
MEETING 

The next meeting of the International 
Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest Com- 
mittee will be held at the call of the 
Chairman and Secretary of the Commit- 
tee. 

ADJOURNMENT 

The meeting was adjourned by Chair- 
man Ed Wasielewski November 2. 1968. 
Respectfully submitted, 
Leo Gable 

Secretary International 
Carpenters Apprenticeship 
Contest Committee 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




/ 
/ 




LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Local 3 5 5, Buffalo, Holds 80th Anniversary Banquet 



Last November 2 Local 355 of Buffalo, 
N. Y., held an anniversary banquet and 
dance to commemorate 80 years of serv- 
ice in the United Brotherhood of Carpen- 
ters and Joiners of America. 

Members and their wives and guests 
attending the banquet totaled 222 and 
more came later to participate in the 
social festivities and the dancing. 

The Buffalo district council president, 
Herman F. Bodewes. made pin presenta- 
tions to four members of the local union 
for 50 years of membership, and to 13 
members for 25 years of membership. 

The local union is comprised of 185 
members, of which 17 are pensioners. 

John Dresser, a member for 55 years, 
was specially mentioned, and the signal 
honor of achievement was bestowed upon 
Adolph Boyack. He has attained the age 
of 94 years and has 68 years of con- 
tinuous membership in Local 355. 

Brother Boyack served as president of 
the local union from 1909 to 1921. 

Many historical and commendable 
events of Local 355 in its militant pro- 
gression through the years, and the im- 
petus and support it has given to the 
Brotherhood in general, were cited by 
such notable speakers as General Secre- 
tary R. E. Livingston (formerly of Buf- 
falo) and Buffalo District Council Presi- 
dent H. F. Bodewes. Local Financial 
Secretary L. C. Schmidt spoke briefly, 
and outlined eight (for octogenarian) of 
the many facets of qualities and tenets of 
the union, with emphasis on integrity, 
and equality. 

The invocation and benediction of the 
sumptuous affair were offered up by 
members of the clergy. 





Local 355 President Anthony Pinski, left, 
congratulates 68-Year-Memher Adolph 
Boyack, 94 years old. At right is the 
honored guest. General Secretary R. E. 
Livingston. 



Participants in the Local 355 celebration included the following 50 and 25-year 
members: First Row. Adolph Boyack, August Winkelman, William Klausman, John 
Dresser. Second Row, Carl Schmidt. Daniel MacDonald, Joseph Tschaepe. William 
Haese, \lbert Kohl. Third Row. Lawrence Hans, Frank Warner, George Hummer. 
William Englert, William Schenk. Fourth Row, William Weisser and Leonard 
Majerowski. 

Carpenters Join 

INTECHITY I 

Ghetto Rebuilding 

A pace-setting program for cities all 
across the nation for the rebuilding of 
ghctios has been launched in St. Louis. 
Mo., with the AFL-CIO playing a ma- 
jor role, not only financially but in 
worker training, too. 

The goal of the program is to rehabil- 
itate 300 dilapidated houses in a 200- 
block slum area over a 2-year period 
at a cost of S4.000.000. financed in part 
by the AFL-CIO. In addition to the AFL- 
CIO. management, a neighborhood group 
and the government arc cooperating in 
the program. 

Contracts involving 14 building trades 
organizations have been drawn. They 
involve locals of the Operating Engi- 
neers. Plasterers, Ccmcnl Masons. Car- 
penters. Stone Workers. Shed Metal 
Workers. Plumbers. Painters. Bricklayers, 
International Brotherhood of Electrical 
Workers. Laborers and Teamsters and 
District Councils of the Laborers and 
Carpenters. 




FOUNDATION 

The official seal for the 80th anniversary 
celebration of Local 355. The eight- 
sided seal incorporated the Brotherhood 
emblem and eight key words that de- 
scribe the local union's eight decades of 
service. 

As part of Ihe program, a small choral 
group of Ihc members of Local 355 s.mg 
songs of days gone by in four native 
tongues for the mixed nationalities of the 
membership. There was community sing- 
ing of songs of the past. 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



21 



Tennessee State Council Holds 20th Annual Convention 




Forty-six delegates from Memphis Local 345 attended the two-da 
Council of Carpenters. Pictured, left to right, front row. Roy Hu 
Secretary-Treasurer, So. Council of Lumber & Plywood Worke 
L. Sewell, Jr., President, Tennessee State Council of Carpenters; 
Rogers, Board Member, Tennessee State Council; Tommy S 
Morris, Area Co-ordinator; W. W. Orr, Representative, UBC&J 
George L. Henegar, Joint Representative, Tennessee State Coun 
William Sidell, Second General Vice President, UBC&JA. Back 
Representative; James R. Biggers, Representative; J. C. Henson, 
tary-Treasurer, Tennessee State Council. 



y session of the 20th Annual Convention of the Tennessee State 
ndley. Board Member, Tennessee State Council; Floyd Doolittle, 
rs; Doyle Williams, Board Member, Tennessee State Council; I. 

R. J. Mincey, Board Member, Tennessee State Council; Bert K. 
. Gilbson, Sr., Representative. Second Row, left to right: H. E. 
A; Fernie Rayburn, Board Member, State Council of Carpenters; 
cil; John T. Walker, Board Member, Tennessee State Council; 

row, left to right: James Wallace, Representative; Ed i, miliums. 

Jr., Board Member, Tennessee State Council; H. Welch, Secre- 



Local 515 Salutes 
Military Veterans 

Local 515 Colorado Springs, Colo., 
recently expressed appreciation to all its 
members who are veterans. 

Receiving a special salute was Local 
515's oldest member veteran, Robert 
Frantz. He spent two years, 1918 to 
1920, in the Army during World War 
I. His unit was the 35th Infantry, Texas 
Division. 

Brother Frantz joined Local 515 in 
1908. Some of his time was spent in 
Local 47 of St. Louis, Missouri. At the 
time of his retirement he was with the 
District Council and Apprentice Train- 
ing program in St. Louis. 

Brother W. W. Carrothers, with 50 
years membership, and Brother George 
Wright, with 44 years membership, also 
served their country during World 
War I. 



* 



I 






y 



22 




I. L. Sewell, Jr. (right), President of the Tennessee State Council of Carpenters, wel- 
comes William Sidell, Second General Vice President of the Brotherhood, to the 
Council's 20th Annual Convention which was attended by several State and Interna- 
tional Officers. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



Local 350 Member Honored in Retirement 




The officers of Local 350, New Rochelle, N. Y., recently honored one of their senior 
members, Jack Cumming, who was business agent for 17 years and vice president 
for 5 years. Brother Cumming is retiring to the Carpenters Home in Lakeland, Fla. 
Members pictured, front row, left to right: Sal Zatfino, trustee; A. Kneisck, present 
business agent; Jack Cumming; Jack Gibson, treasurer. Second row: C. A. DeSimone, 
financial secretary; Robert Smith, warden; D. Marino, trustee. Back row: Louis J. 
Malo, recording secretary: H. Kapp, conductor; R. Quinn, trustee; and A. Blasie, 
president. 



Local 880 Holds Farewell D 


inner 







Local 880, Bernardsville, N. J„ which recently consolidated with Local 455, Somer- 
ville, N. J., held a Farewell Dinner. Pictured, left to right, are officers and guests: 
Samual Lare, Robert F. Ohlweiler, General Representative; Helen R. Gerber, Execu- 
tive Director of New Jersey Carpenters Welfare and Pension Funds; Raleigh Rajoppi, 
General Executive Board Members; James Moss, secretary-treasurer. New Jersey 
State Council of Carpenters; and Theodore Vallacchi. Standing, left to right: 
William Ryan, Robert Martz, Samual Barratt, Gordon Dickinson, Joseph Belli, Harry 
Gawrcluk, Wallace Harvey, Robert Germuka, and Lewis Herkoltz. 

Local 470, Tacoma, Washington, Officers 




Executive officers of Local 470, Tacoma, Washington, are pictured at a recent smor- 
gasbord and dance, left to right, front row: Robert Brown, conductor; Jack Mitchell, 
trustee; Paul Rudd, general representative; Harold Cosgrove, business representative; 
Harold Miller, trustee. Second row, left to right: Roger W. Crusan, business repre- 
sentative; Percy B. Watkins, financial secretary; Marion Nagcl, trustee; Elvet White- 
lock, warden; and Leonard J. Liehelt, president. 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



23 




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Newly-Elected in Glidden, Wisconsin 




New officers were recently installed in Local 2898, Glidden, Wisconsin. Pictured, 
front row, left to right: Dale R. Baker, recording secretary; Frank Straetz, financial 
secretary; Harold Storch, president; John Mindel, vice president. Back row, left to 
right: Oscar Traap, honored guest; Bernard Peterhansel, master-of-ceremonies; Douglas 
Shroeder, guest. Byron McCorrison, treasurer, was unable to attend the ceremonies. 



Who Understands Anybody? 



By JANE GOODSELL 



We attach labels to each other. Bill 
is a regular fellow. Adam is tight-fisted. 
Susan is always so thoughtful. Jean is 
organized. Vivien is scatter-brained. 
Lucy is witty, Mary is gay, Will is an ex- 
trovert, Mike is bitter and sardonic. We 
sum each other up in a word or two, 
knowing— if we stop to think about it— 
that nobody is all that simple, but real- 
izing, too, that we can never grasp all 
the complexities and contradictions that 
make up another human being. 

So we over-simplify. We analyze and 
dissect each other, drawing on hearsay 
gossip and confidences exchanged at 
cocktail parties and snippets of Freudian 
psychology to explain what Bill or 
Adam or Susan is really like. 

"Oh, Bill isn't really the hail-fellow he 
seems to be," we say, feeling rather 
smug about our own perceptiveness. 
"Underneath, he's really very shy and 
unsure of himself." 

"Mary throws herself into civic af- 
fairs," we explain glibly, "because her 
marriage is unhappy." 

We fit people into niches, folding 
them up tidily like a pair of socks and 
filing them away to be forgotten until 
the next time they cross our paths or 
minds. And, after all, what else can you 
do with other people? How can we pos- 
sibly "understand" the paradox that is 



somebody else? People can't be solved 
like arithmetic problems or explained 
by theories. People are riddles without 
answers. 

But we aren't content to let it go at 
that. Having, as we do, a basic need to 
classify and systemize and tabulate, we 
assign characteristics to people and we 
expect them to behave accordingly— to 
stay in character. 

It's not surprising that we so often 
surprise each other. What is surprising 
is the sense of betrayal we feel at the 
unexpected— when a "happy" marriage 
goes on the rocks, when a "well-adjust- 
ted" friend has a nervous breakdown, 
when a "stingy" person does something 
generous, when a "dumb" kid gets 
into Harvard, when a "sweet" girl 
makes a cruel remark. 

What upsets us is the shocking real- 
ization that the labels we have attached 
to other people don't fit. We had them 
doped out all wrong. We become acute- 
ly conscious of the fact that people, like 
icebergs, keep a large part of them- 
selves submerged and only a very little 
bit visible. We wonder uneasily how 
well we "know" anybody. It is a very 
uncomfortable feeling but it is, I think, 
the way we ought to feel about each 
other. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



Our Readers Rate the Occupations, 
Move Carpenters Up Status Ladder 



In the December issue of The Car- 
penter we published the findings of 
three separate studies made among 
students and teachers, as to their status 
ratings of various occupations. (Pages 
16, 17. December issue). The studies 
were made in 1925, 1946, and 1967. 

In the 42 years between the first 
and the last survey, bankers had 
dropped in student and teacher esteem 
from first place to fourth. Carpenters 
had moved up from 1 6th place to 
11th. Doctors had moved from the 
second spot to the first. 

We were curious about the opinions 
of union members on this subject, so 
we added a small ballot at the end of 
our December article, asking readers 
to rate the occupations, too. 

The response was not the sort of 
sampling which would cause Dr. 
George Gallup to rush to his com- 
puter — approximately 50 replied — but 
it was sufficient for a concensus. 

This was how the latest student- 
teacher survey (1967) compared with 
our own Carpenter survey (1968): 

Guidance Journal Ratings (1967) 

1 — Physician 

2 — Lawyer 

3 — Superintendent of Schools 

4 — Banker 

5 — Civil Engineer 

6 — Elementary School Teacher 

7 — Foreign Missionary 

8 — Army Captain 

9 — Electrician 
10 — Insurance Agent 
1 1 — Carpenter 
12 — Machinist 
13 — Traveling Salesman 
14 — Barber 
15— Soldier 
16 — Plumber 
I 7 — Grocer 
I 8 — Mail Carrier 
19 — Farmer 
20 — Motorman 
21 — Truck Driver 
22 — lanitor 
23 — Coal Miner 
24— Hod Carrier 
25 — Ditch Digger 

Carpenter Magazine Ratings (1968) 

1 — Physician. Farmer 
2 — Lawyer 

* 3 — Superintendent of Schools 
4 — Civil Engineer. Banker 

* 5 — Superintendent of Schools 

6 — Elementary School Teacher 



7 — Army Captain 

* 8 — Machinist, Electrician 

9 — Electrician. Foreign Missionary 
*10 — Machinist, Electrician. Carpen- 
ter. Soldier 

11 — Machinist 

12 — Machinist, Plumber 

13 — Mail Carrier 
*14 — Grocer, Truck Driver 

15 — Traveling Salesman 

1 6 — Grocer 

17 — Mail Carrier. Insurance Agent 

18 — Truck Driver 

19 — Motorman 

20 — Barber, Soldier 

21 — Truck Driver 

22 — Janitor 
*23 — Coal Mirier, Janitor. Hod Car- 
rier 

24 — Hod Carrier 

25 — Ditch Digger 

* highest number of votes in this rat- 
ing position. 

Some readers offered us comments 
along with their ballots. 

Two or three, as might be expected, 
thought carpenters had been short- 
changed. Leonard Pottinger of Louis- 
ville, Ky., said, "It seems that some 
people think if you can hit a nail on 
the head, you're a carpenter." Mrs. 
David Lowery of Milwaukee, Wis., 
widow of a member of Local 264. con- 
siders the occupation of her late hus- 
band tops. Hubert Wood of San Pablo. 
Calif., moved the carpenter up to 7th 
position or higher, explaining that the 
carpenter "must understand all con- 
struction on his job." 

Brother Wood also took the time 
to make pertinent comments on all 
the occupations. For example, he rates 
the physician highest for "his health 
responsibilities:" he calls the civil en- 
gineer "designer supreme:" to him. the 
elementary school teacher is "the first 
guide to character:" the grocer (who 
rated 18th with him) is. nowadays, 
"an adding machine"; and the mail 
carrier, "the neighborhood voice." 

Our readers rate farmers relatively 
high. One-tenth of the ballots rated 
the farmer first. Robert Van Norman 
of Oconto, Wis., calls them "number 
one." "The farmer has to raise the 
food for all the people, or we would 
starve." 

Ida Mac Buchholz of Nokomis, III., 
asked us not to forget the mortician 
and the garbage collector . . . we'll 
try not to. 




\ 



'"'4* 



J 



if 2 f^ 

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FEBRUARY, 1969 



25 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



Big Buck Bagged 




JP% .1 ft 



One of the largest bucks taken from 
New York State we've heard tell about 
in many a moon can be credited to Axel 
Krigsman. a member of Local 791, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. Above is a pic submit- 
ted by Axel's brother Nils which graphi- 
cally records the feat. The moose-like 
deer, a seven pointer which dressed out 
at 200 pounds was downed near Schroon 
Lake, N. Y. A tip of the hunter's topper 
to Axel and a word of thanks to his 
brother Nils, also a member of the 
Brotherhood, Local 1397, Roslyn, New 
York, who snapped this excellent pic. 

■ BC Baits Busy 

Arthur Edie of 6012 Beacon Avenue 
S., Seattle, Washington, a member of 
Local 1289 for over 25 years and re- 
cently retired from the workaday world, 
has high praise for the finny merits of 
the Okinagan country of British Columbia 
although he admits that on his last visit 
there he caught no fish. He was too busy 
taking trout off the line that his Missus 
caught. Can't win 'em all, Art. 



■ Monstrous Moose 

A note from Donald G. Sudau, busi- 
ness representative of Local 674, Mt. 
Clemens, Michigan, brings us up to date 
about a recent hunt junket by fellow 
Local 764 member Bernie Cathers of 
8558 Anchor Bay Drive, Fair Haven, 
Michigan. He writes: 

"Brother Bernie Cather hit the nimrod's 
jackpot about 45 minutes after the hunt 
season opened in the Tick Lake area of 
Ontario, Canada. Here's a pic of him 
with the monstrous moose he downed 
with a neck shot at 70 yards from his 
Model 270 Winchester. Moose weighed 
about 1,400 pounds including a weight 
of 47 pounds for the rack which sported 
a spread of 62 inches. Bernie's hunt 
partners remarked that he was lucky to 
have downed the moose before it died 
of a heart attack brought about by hav- 
ing to carry those 47 pounds of horns 
around. 



tree; did flip flop and practically landed 
in his lap. Dressed out buck revealed 
bullet had hit heart. Brother Scarsella 
uses single shot pistol which fires 257' 
bullet, 87 grains. (By all means, Emeric, 
I'd like to hear about your antelope hunt 
in Wyoming.) 

■ Conowingo Cats 

"When the catfish are bitin' at Cono- 
wingo Dam in Maryland, the action is 
terrific." That is the assurance from two 
members of the Brotherhood, Mason Lee 
and Red Wire, both members of Local 
101 in Baltimore. On a past Conowingo 
visit, they returned with bowed-in-middle 
stringers for both anglers, and here's 
graphic proof of the catfish pie — Red 
Wire, left; Mason Lee at right. All fish 
were duped on cut bait and tipped the 
scales from 2 to 6V2 pounds. "No rec- 
ord," says Brother Lee, "but mighty fine 
table fare and lots of fun to catch." 





■ Single-Shot Scarsella 

Emeric Scarsella of Industry, Pa., a 
member of Local 422, has given up 
shooting with rifle, shotgun or bow. He 
prefers hunting them with pistol. On 
recent hunt he fired at buck which rushed 
him; missed him by inches, rammed into 



■ Chinook Catch 

One of the most outstanding Chinook 
catches we've ever seen can be credited 
to Mrs. R. D. 
Wells, wife of 
Richard D. Wells, 
Mobile Home 
Court, Arbuckle, 
California, recent- 
ly retired from the 
San Francisco Pile 
Drivers' Union Lo- 
cal 34. Brother 
Wells writes: 

"It takes a wom- 
an to beat a man 
fishing every time! 
My wife Eileen, 
caught this 45-lb. 
Chinook (king) 
salmon during last 
year's run in the Sacramento River at 
Grimes. As you can see, it's a fresh- 
in, chrome-bright beauty. It weighed 45 
pounds. 

"We spend our leisure time fishing and 
now I have a goal to aim for; thanks to 
her, as my biggest salmon to date 
weighed 32 pounds." 



26 



THE CARPENTER 







■ School for Saltchuck 

Varied and plentiful are the finny 
denizens of the saltchuck off the Florida 
coast. Locate the 
school and you're 
!*.J bound to bring 

home a bucketfull. 
One angler in par- 
ticular who regu- 
larly taps the briny 
A 1 off Florida's shores 
•»^m is Arthur O. Trock 

of 1628 Colleen 
St., Sarasota. Flor- 
ida, a retired Mill- 
man and a member 
of Philadelphia's 
Local 359. We hear 
that Brother Trock 
has a "Golden 
Card." recording 
45 year's member- 
ship.) 
Past trip to deep waters, about 10 
miles off Sarasota, in the Gulf of Mex- 
ico, yielded an outstanding catch for 
Brother Trock: Seven kingfish. ranging 
from 10 to 15 pounds, and a cobia that 
tipped the scales at 18-lbs. He used spin 
gear all the way and duped the cobia on 
a "Captain Action" No. 7 spoon. Here's 
a pic of Brother Trock with his cobia. 

■ When Does Are Due 

"We've been asked from time to time 
our sentiments on doe seasons. Briefly, 
this is where we stand: 

Any given piece of land has a certain 
carrying capacity: can support just so 
many deer. Sometimes to have more 
deer, we must shoot more deer for when 
an over-population of deer exists, the 
range is in danger of ruin, sometimes for 
all time. 

When a farmer's field is ripe it must 
be harvested. When the fruit of the or- 
chard has matured it must be marketed, 
not stored in a warehouse to rot. Like- 
wise when there is a surplus of deer — 
bucks or does — they should be harvested, 
or the surplus will die of starvation, with- 
out benefit to anyone. 

1914 LABOR CONTRACT 

Continued from Page 17 

were already working at the trade 
when the conditions set forth in the 
workslip prevailed. There is hardly 
a member whose father was not alive 
at that time. 

So, within a single lifetime, the 
United Brotherhood has managed 
to elevate the status of a carpenter 
from the bare subsistence level that 
existed half a century ago to the 
decent wages and working stand- 
ards which prevail at the present 
time. ■ 

F E B R U A R Y , 19 6 9 



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Apprentices Graduate at Martinez, Calif. 

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A total of 43 apprentices, all members of Local 2046, recently completed their 
training in ceremonies at Martinez, Calif. Joe O'Sullivan, newly-elected president of 
the Bay Counties District Council, presented each graduate with a new saw, a gift 
of the local union. Participants in the ceremonies included: FIRST ROW, from left: 
Frank Nevis, assistant business agent; John Stevens, trustee; J. C. Wilson, Jeff Nelson, 
Michael E. Hammil, Lewis R. Lundry; Gary Murphy, and Edward M. Jordon, Presi- 
dent. SECOND ROW, Haney Breashears, Vice President; unidentified person; Joe 
O'Sullivan, President, Bay Counties District Council; Ted Gruhn, recording secretary, 
Local 2046; George Machado, business agent; Don Meyer, apprentice coordinator; 
Tom Phillips, financial secretary; Jason Evans, conductor; George Bogger, warden. 
THIRD ROW, Deano Cerri, trustee; Wilbert Davis, Robert Fryman, Tony Viola, 
Tom Dozier, Donald Byrns, David Medeiros, and Ronald Lahti. FOURTH ROW, 
Al Fouch, assistant business agent; Marvin Haworth, Roland Faiferek, Ralph Warner, 
Gene G. Galster, and Ernest Turnage. 

Math Trainees Complete Studies in Detroit 

ft A 




Classes in math, taught under a Manpower Development and Training contract, were 
recently completed in Detroit. Participants included: Front Row: Albert Johnson, 
Ralph Cole, Marvin Grisham (Business Manager, Local Union No. 1433), Anthony 
Ochocki (M.D.T.A. National Project Coordinator), Syd Londo (M.D.T.A. Area Co- 
ordinator), Robert C. Lowes, and George Dimirroff (Instructors at Apprentice School 
and Instructors of the Journeyman classes at Local 1433), and George Banko (Busi- 
ness Agent, Millmen Local 1452). Middle Row: Harold Burke, Vern Plowman, 
Luther Chapman, Louis Nye, Bill Blazak, Cecil Coleman, James Brown, Louis Mac- 
Donald. Back Row: John Sardy, William Way, Charles Kelley, Carl Thornburg, 
Harold Innes, Gerald Buie, Fraser T. Anderson. 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




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These States Plan '69 Contests 

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Happy Pre-Apprentices in Louisville 



State 


Carp- 


Mill- 


Mill- 




enter 


Cabinet 


wright 


Alabama 


X 


X 


X 


California 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


X 


X 


X 


Delaware 


X 






District of Coltimb 


ia x 


X 




Florida 


\ 






Idaho 


x 






Indiana 


X 




X 


Iowa 


X 






Louisiana 


X 




X 


Massachusetts 


X 


X 




Michigan 


X 




X 


Missouri 


X 


X 


X 


Ohio 


X 




X 


Oklahoma 


X 






Oregon 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


X 






Texas 


X 




X 


Washington 


X 


X 




Wisconsin 


X 






Alberta 


X 






British Columbia 


X 






Ontario 


X 




X 




A pre-apprcnlicc class under MDTA contract with the Falls Cities Carpenter Joint 
Apprenticeship Committee, Louisville. Kentucky, recently completed its work. At 
completion ceremonies were: Kneeling, left to right, Jackie Senior, Onic Gatcwood, 
Billy Hammond. Herbert I'hipps, Wilbur Crick. Second row, left to right, Mike 
Masden, Hmi.ii Ellis, Kenneth Herbert, Charles Brumlcve, John Wecdman. Third 
row, left to right, Phillip Schrewsberrj. William Wheatley. Terry Tyler, David Ellis. 
George Sharp, James Ruckcr, Don Carwile. 



FEBRUARY, 1969 



29 



Hutcheson Forest 

Continued from Page 5 

ten some ancient man must have hol- 
lowed out a rotten log and thus be- 
came the very first carpenter. In the 
thousands of generations since that 
time carpentry has developed into 
a complex skill. But the close tie be- 
tween carpentry and the woods has 
changed very little. 

"As a whole, carpenters have, I 
believe, a greater interest in our 



forests and woods than any other 
branch of society. Materials come 
and go, but to the carpenter, wood is 
king of them all. The kinship be- 
tween carpenter and wood is as old 
as mankind. 

"Therefore, whatever happens in 
the woodlands of America is close 
to his heart. The diseases and insects 
which threaten the forests are his 
enemies. The harvesting methods 
which ruin reseeding arouse his 
anger. The scientific advancements 



which promise better forests for to- 
morrow get his wholehearted sup- 
port. And, most of all, he believes 
that no man can visit the woods 
without refreshing his spirit and re- 
building his hope. 

"It is only natural that the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Join- 
ers of America should have a deep 
interest in the saving of these woods 
for study purposes. What scientists 
learn here may affect our future for 
generations to come." 



Double-Claw Hammer 

Continued from Page 14 

M. F. Allen of Marysville, Wash., 
can recall earlier days in Kenosha, 
Wis., when a double-claw hammer 
was useful. Says he: "In wrecking 
old buildings in the old days a crow- 
bar was a must . . . The foot-long 
to two-foot pinch bar was not too 
common, and when a carpenter or 
wrecker was on a ladder pulling 
nails, he often ran across an extra 
long nail or spike. If he didn't have 
a small block of wood on his person 
to place under the hammer head, he 
had to descend the ladder for one. 
The use of the block extended the 
pulling radius of the hammer . . ." 

Mrs. Arthur Barrette of Prairie du 
Chein, Wis., wonders why the ham- 
mer isn't still in use. "It just goes to 
show that people years ago had more 
brains than this generation gives 
them credit for," she comments. 

Ira Hull of Rochester, Minn., re- 
calls seeing one of these hammers in 
1907 or 1908 when he was a young 
man in Frederick, Md., learning 
woodworking and cabinet making. 
His instructor, a Mr. Stubbs, who 
had learned his trade in England, 
had one in a prized collection of 
tools. 

Thomas Weaver of Alexandria, 
Va., tells us that he made a double- 
claw hammer in 1930. He had a 
single -claw hammer with a broken 
head, which he added to the handle 
of a good hammer. This home-made 
job served him for many years. 

George Huckabay of Beaumont, 
Texas, reminds us that the double- 
claw tool would be useful in work- 



ing with 16-penny nails. Andrew 
Reese of Hillsboro, Ore., says his 
grandfather used one for pulling 
square-cut nails. 

It is evident from the correspond- 
ence received by The Carpenter that 
many members are avid collectors of 
antique tools. Lee Pollard of Local 
727, Hialeah, Fla., for example, says 
he has collected 567 old woodwork- 
ing hand tools and "still looking for 
more." His oldest piece, he says, is a 
118-year-old, dated saw, of English 
make with a rosewood handle. He 
and many others would like to ex- 
change information about collec- 
tions. 

We had an interesting letter from 
R. W. Abbott, of Houston, Tex., 
a 77-year-old veteran of the craft, 
who believes the hammer is a "Ma- 
dale" — a custom-made job of his 
early days. Brother Abbott says he 
acquired one in his teens for "four 
bits" and that he still has it. 

At the other end of the age scale, 
Justin Douglas Wascom of Denham 
Springs, La., age 10 and in the fifth 
grade, let us know that even he 




Martin Supilowski, Jr., of Local 199, 
Chicago, suggests that the Supilowski- 
designed screw above "goes with that 
special hammer." 



could figure out the use of the 
double-claw hammer . . . and he ex- 
plained it to us in clear and simple 
terms. 

To all those who wrote in, dis- 
playing their interest, The Carpen- 
ter expresses appreciation. Below is 
a listing of those who submitted 
solutions or ideas: (If any have 
been inadvertantly omitted, it is re- 
gretted.) 

Martin Supilanski. Jr., Local 199, Chi- 
cago, 111.; Karl W. Hutcheson, Local 1020, 
Newberg, Ore.; M. F. Allen, Marysville, 
Wash.; Kenneth Runkle, Local 215, 
Lafayette, Ind.; Lee A. Pollard, Local 
727, Hialeah, Fla.; Stanley Remski, Local 
1135, Port Jefferson. N.Y.; Harry Stem- 
merman, Local 1292, Huntington, L.I., 
N.Y.; Joseph Aucain, Local 275, New- 
ton, Mass.; Ed Shelton, Beecher City, 111. 

Mrs. Arthur Barrette, Local 314, Prairie 
du Chein, Wise; Frank L. Paul, Prairie 
City, 111.; Harvey B. Behnke, Local 955, 
Appleton, Wise; Louis Greenstein, Local 
1038, Ellenville, N.Y.; Peter Marino, 
Woodside, N.Y.; George G. Dippel, Local 
2015, Fillmore, Calif.; Ira B. Hull, Local 
1382, Rochester, Minn.; H. R. Panetta, 
Local 3127, Valley Cottage, N.Y.; 
Thomas F. Weaver, Alexandria, Va.; 
William E. Paulsen, Oshkosh, Wise. 

Garfield Fors, Local 66, Jamestown, 
N.Y.; George G. Huckabay, Local 753, 
Beaumont. Tex.; Andrew Reese, Local 
2130, Hillsboro, Ore.; Henry O'Kester, 
Local 500, Butler, Pa.; Gerald E. Clark, 
1797, Renton. Wash.; R. W. Abbott, 
Local 213, Houston, Tex.; Mrs. Joseph 
Philips, Livonia, Mich.; Lloyd G. John- 
son, Local 94, Providence, R.I.; Robert 
D. Palmer. Local 35, San Rafael, Calif.; 
Jerry H. Reganess, Newton, N.J.; Ray 
Teichman, Cicero, 111. 

Eric Hallquist. Local 35, San Rafael, 
Calif.; Joseph G. Fow, Local 260, Water- 
bury, Conn.; T. Jack Stowell, Wauna, 
Wash.; Julis A. Artis, Local 1098, Baton 
Rouge, La.; J. Squilla, Sr., Local 15, 
Hackensack, N.J.; Julius Huszar, Local 
985, Gary, Ind.; Harry C. Tenney, Local 
1503. Sunderland, Mass.; Justin Douglas 
Wascom, Denham Springs, La. 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) NORWOOD, MASSACHUSETTS 
— Local 866 recently held a banquet to 
honor its old-timers who have been mem- 
bers of the Local for 25 and 50 years. 
Only one member, Nestor Matson (cen- 
ter) received a 50-year pin. Members are 
pictured, left to right: Norman St. Onge 
(25 years); Vernon Conrad (25 years); 
Brother Matson; and Steve Saja (25 
years). President Roger Flaherty (extreme 
right) made the pin presentations. 

(2) NORTHAMPTON, MASS.— Lo- 
cal 351 held its annual awards dinner 
recently and members were presented 
with membership pins. Pictured, left to 
right: Donald Bickford, president, pre- 
senting a fifty-year pin to William Mur- 
phy, past-president; Leo Gagne, recording 
secretary, 45 years; Albert Valenta, 25 
years and Timothy Daley, vice president. 
The interested onlooker is Robert J. 
McGrath, first full-time business repre- 
sentative of the Pioneer Valley District 
Council of Carpenters, which embraces 
Locals 351, Northampton; 549, Green- 
field; and 1372, Easthampton. 

(3) TUSCALOOSA, ALABAMA — 
Local 1337 honored its senior members 
at a special meeting held at the North- 
port National Guard Armory, and pre- 
sented 25-year pins to those members 




pictured, seated, left to right: Lee Nabors 
(27 years); Otha Lee Smith (25 years); 
J. C. Tucker (27 years); W. E. Simmons 
(29 years); S. E. Thomas (26 years); 
J. T. Reed (27 years); J. D. Summerlin 
(28 years); Edward Tierce (25 years); 
J. T. Tommie (30 years); Asa N. Bradley 
(26 years); and Ambus B. Jones (26 
years). Second row, left to right: Robert 
W. Heyde (27 years); Jesse R. Graham 
(25 years); R. E. McKnight (27 years); 
Raiford Snyder (28 years); Doyle V. 
Utley (26 years); Warren L. Brown (33 
years); R. K. Allen (32 years); Raymond 
J. Aulger (27 years); CM. Hubbert (33 



years); Victor F. Emerson (27 years); 
Thomas N. Stone (30 years). Back row. 
left to right: C. E. Turnipseed (27 years); 
H. D. Ward (42 years); A. D. Orr (40 
years); Sam Hunter (25 years); R. B. 
Laney (27 years); Mcrton M. Fincher (26 
years); J. E. Calhoun (26 years); E. F. 
Mayfield (26 years); Homer Utley (33 
years); Kelley B. Tucker (29 years); 
Charles P. Hamby (31 years). Brothers 
H. D. Ward and A. D. Orr are Charter 
Members of the Local. A member of the 
Toastmasters Club made a brief speech 
and James C. Kyzer, treasurer of the 
Local, was master of ceremonies. 




FEBRUARY, 1969 



31 




(4) COFFEYVILLE, KANSAS — 
Local 1212 honored four senior mem- 
bers at a banquet held in Carpen- 
ters Hall. Pin recipients were, left to 
right: Vane Alberts, 45 years; Tom 
Wright, 50 years; John Gustus, 30 
years; and Ray Ruthruff, 50 years. 

(5) CHICAGO, ILLINOIS— Local 
1693 (Millwrights & Machinery Erec- 
tors) held a pin presentation ceremony 
honoring two 50-year members and one 
hundred forty-four 25-year members. 
Pictured, left to right: George Vest, 
president of the Chicago District Coun- 
cil of Carpenters; Clifford Chase, senior 
trustee; Albert Frieden, president; Emil 
Ludwigsen, 50-year members; and John 
Lucas, business representative. Charles 
Engman, the other 50-year member, 
was unable to attend. 



(5A) The twenty-five year members 
are pictured with officers and guests at 
the awards ceremony. 

(6) ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 
— Local 531 recently honored those 
members who had completed twenty- 
five years of membership in good 
standing. 

The pins were presented by Brother 
Van Pittman, International Represent- 
ative, and Brother Paul Long, District 
Council Business Agent. Front row, 
left to right: Ed Brown, Roy Carder, 
Walter Sudick, W. J. Omand, Adrian 
Eyler, Carl Swanson, William Starling, 
Richard Sheff, Charles Seible, Carl 
Schoenau, Gust Anderson, Carlo Jacob- 
sen, Max Giddeon, Harold Goodrich, 
and H. P. Galloway. Second row, left 



to right: Ed Lamorder, Joe Dambecker, 
Rocco Biscardi, August Flesh man, 
Archie Colby, Fred Kilburn, J. Stra- 
thern, Albert Adreen, Robert Bancroft, 
Ralph Anderson, Archie DeLange, 
Frank B. DeLay, William Elder, Eu- 
gene Clower, and Robert Bates. Third 
row, left to right: Barney Holt, Charles 
Tyler, Robert Holt, John Mulligan, 
Clayton Ccelis, Ellsworth Wood, con- 
ductor; Paul Zeller, E. W. Johnson, 
Carl DeLange, Paul Long, District 
Council Business Agent; Van Pittman, 
International Representative; Lester 
Clester, business representative; W. W. 
Rogers, president; R. Alexander, record- 
ing secretary; and D. N. Anderson, 
financial secretary. Back row, left to 
right: R. J. Grondin and C. J. Bowman, 
both trustees. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 




(7) CHESTER, ILLINOIS— Mem- 
bership pins were presented to charter 
members of Local 1361 at their annual 
picnic last fall. Each pin was awarded 
for at least twenty-five years of active 
service in the Brotherhood. Financial 
Secretary Edgar Werre is pictured re- 
ceiving his 25-year pin from Roger 
Ohlau, president, as the other members 
watch. 

(7A) Other members who received 
pins are, front row, left to right: Elmer 
Hinnerich, 27 years; Carl Hartenberger, 
32 years; Vernon Falkenhein, 25 years; 
Dean Fulton, 27 years; Ed Wolfe, 28 
years. Back row, left to right: Fred 
Ncihouse, 27 years; Norman Nagel, 27 
years; Henry Hermes, 29 years; Ray 
Tudor, 26 years; Martin Schroeder, 32 
years; Dorian Lohrding, 33 years; Law- 
rence Nagel, 27 years; Herman Mayer, 
28 years; John B. Wiley, 29 >ears; John 
Budina, 30 years; Edgar Werre, 25 
years; Hugo Bierman, 27 years; and 
Henry Bargman, 28 years. 

(8) CHICAGO, ILLINOIS — Local 
13 recently honored Jack Saw don with 
his 60-year service pin. Brother Sawdon 
is retired from the trade but still re- 
mains very active in the Local. He 



travels over 100 miles each way, by pub- 
lic transportation, to attend every meet- 
ing. He has served Local 13 as conductor 
for many years. Dan O'Connell, record- 
ing secretary of the Local, remarks, "He 
is a guiding light for many apprentices 
and journeymen." Members pictured, 
left to right: M. James Sexton, president 
of Local 13; Brother Sawdon; and George 
Vest, Jr., president of the Carpenters Dis- 
trict Council of Chicago. 

(9) SAGINAW, MICHIGAN— Lo- 
cal 334 honored two members recently 
at its annual dinner-dance. Frank B. 
Brooks was presented with a 50-year 
pin and Harold C. Strieter received a 
25-year pin. Godfrey W. Alteman, 
business representative, is pictured con- 
gratulating Brother Brooks (left) and 
Brother Strieter (center). 

(10) VANCOUVER, WASHINGTON 

— Local 1715 honored 25-year mem- 
bers with a pin awards ceremony. 



Seated, left to right: Ray Furgason, 
Charles Sheehan, V. T. Ragan, Charles 
Quigley, R. R. Hulett, A. J. Dieter, 
L. E. Fundine, Melvin Thompson, 
James Edwards, Earl Miller, Rev. Hugh 
Wood, guest and a member of the 
Local, and Peter Mesedahl. Second 
row, left to right: Ben Wolk, J. N. 
Olin, H. L. Soderlind, Fred Kraft. Au- 
gust Becker, William Rightcr, Ralph 
Evenson, William Walck, A. C. Rob- 
erts, M. M. Frazier, Cecil Haney, P. G. 
Smith, and Kenneth Salvey. Back row: 
Garwood Jones, C. C. Cavin, Orville 
Taj lor, A. P. Johnson, William Gable- 
house, and Hal Morton, guest and inter- 
national representative. Recipients of 
25-year pins who were unable to at- 
tend the ceremony included: Allen Ben- 
thin, Ernest Cain, Floyd Gronroos, 
Everett Hively, L. O. Houglum, Thom- 
as Johner, Klaas Karcls, A. II. Mundt, 
and E. B. Wilcox. 




FEBRUARY, 1969 



33 




(11) TACOMA, WASHINGTON— 
Local 470 held its fourth annual 25- 
year pin presentation recently, honoring 
members with a smorgasbord and 
dance. It was a gala event, enjoyed 
by members, wives, and officers of the 
Local and District Council. 

Pictured are the 62 members who 
received pins for their active service 
in the Brotherhood. 

(12) GLIDDEN, WISC— Local 2898 
honored members who had completed ten 
active years of service in the Brother- 
hood. Front row, left to right: Russel 
Eder; Theodore Schoch; Harold Storch, 
president; Albert Hill. Back row, left to 
right: Oscar Traap, honored guest; Frank 
Straetz, financial secretary; Elmer Eder; 
Bernard Peterhansel, master-of -cere- 
monies; Douglas Schroeder, guest. Ver- 
non Straetz was unable to attend the 
ceremonies. 




(13) JEROME, ARIZONA — Mem- 
bers of Local 1061 recently received 
twenty-five and fifty-year pins for their 
long and dedicated service to the 
Brotherhood. George G. Ede of Long 
Beach, California, was the only mem- 
ber awarded a 50-year service pin, but, 
unfortunately, was unable to attend the 
meeting. Brother Ede has been an ac- 
tive member since 1916, the year the 
charter was granted. 



(13A) Members present to receive 25- 
year membership pins are pictured, left 
to right: Carl Beltz, Evan Derrick, Bert 
Owens, Fred Melick, Hugo Liljenberg, 
and Herman Pendergrass. 

(14) SAN DIEGO, CALIF.— Carl 
M. Barnes was the honored guest of 
the evening at a special meeting last 
year of Local 1296. Brother Barnes, 
who was initiated into the Brotherhood 
on April 8, 1918, received his 50-year 
membership pin. 

Always an active union member, 
Brother Barnes held virtually every of- 
fice in the County District Council of 
Carpenters. He was chairman of the 
building committee which put up the 
Carpenters Hall at 23rd Street and 
Broadway where he received his 50- 
year pin. 

The veteran woodworker is 80 now, 
but remains a member in good stand- 
ing of Local 1296. Despite his retire- 
ment from regular work in 1954, he 
still "fashions and fixes things" in the 
well-equipped shop at his home. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




(15) PENSACOLA, FLA. — Local 
1194 held a Labor Day Fish Fry and 
honored senior members with the presen- 
tation of membership pins. Only one 
member, John Scott, was the proud 
recipient of a 55-year pin. W. E. Com- 
mings was presented with a 50-year pin 
and J. H. Abbott received a 45-year pin. 
Four members, George Amos, Carl J. 
Anderson, J. W. Dixon and F. H. Rob- 
bins, received 35-year pins. 30-year 
membership pins were presented to R. O. 
Croft, George Gunderson and T. P. 
Yates. Members who received 25-year 



15A 



pins were: Joe Blake, J. D. Channell, 
R. O. Croft, ML R. Kintz, C. R. Bush, 
J. H. Coleman, Cody Cooley, Enoch 
Donahue, O. G. Etheridge, A. B. Huff, 
R. D. Strother and C. C. Torrance. 
Howard V. Campbell, president, and 
J. H. McNair, financial secretary and 
business agent, presented the member- 
ship pins. It was a most enjoyable day 
for all. Brother John Scott (right) hap- 
pily displays the membership pin awarded 
to him after 55 years of dedicated serv- 
ice to the Brotherhood. J. H. McNair 
made the presentation. 

(15A) Pictured at the ceremonies are, 
front row, left to right: J. H. McNair, 
J. W. Dixon, M. R. Kintz, J. H. Cole- 
man, John Scott and Howard V. Camp- 
bell. Back row, left to right: A. B. Huff. 
J. D. Channell, R. O. Croft, O. G. 
Etheridge, C. C. Torrance, George Amos 
and Carl J. Anderson. 

(16) HICKSVILLE, NEW YORK— 
(No Picture) — Angelo Galante of 
Naples, Florida, and Kaarlo Souminen 
of Westbury, New York, both members 
of Local 1772, recently received 25- 
year pins in honor of their long and 
devoted service to the Brotherhood. 




. 



.<r .*»> 



1 



-_«■** 





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FEBRUARY, 1969 



35 




^PEMOR» 




L.U. NO. 11, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Cicero, Joseph 
Duganier, Charles 
Eshelman, Arthur 
Jones, William 
Lockard, Robert N. 
Luther, John D. 
Obester, Joseph 
Tatro, Arthur W. 
Vejdovec, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 16, 
SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Hamrick, Fred 
Myers, Gary 
Satlar, Frank 
Woods, Lloyd A. 

L.U. NO. 18, 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Brokloff, John 
Ozimek, John 
Turner, John 

L.U. NO. 19, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Carter, James M. 
Kutas, Stanley 
LaDuke, Bernard 
Moore, Robert 

L.U. NO. 20, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Avallone, Alphonse 
Knibestol, Sverre 
Michalewich, Feodor 
Petersen. Abraham 
Siravo, Dominic 

L.U. NO. 25, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Adams, Jewell M. 
Ashbrook, R. W. 
Atwood, Daniel 
Blackwell, Elmer G. 
Bradford, David H. 
Card, Thomas E. 
Connors, Ted A. 
Daniel, Elias L. 
Davis, Marion 
DeHaan, Jack M. 
Denley, Robert, Sr. 
Dieterle, George J. 
Ebbe, Elmer N. 
Ellison, Arvid 
Godden, A. J. 
Hackney, James R. 
Haffener, Joseph 
Hasler, Fred 
Hay, Eugene D. 
Helton, John W. 
Herman, Abe 
Hibbins, Leslie 
Hogan, Woodrow 
Karam, A. E. 
Klund, Henry 
Kraude, Otto 
Lee, Jesse R. 
Lesher, George H. 
Miles, A. F. 
Ronneberg, Louis P. 
Williams, Charlie 
Yoshikawa, Shigeo 

L.U. NO. 33, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Aragone, Salvatore 
Bradbury John 



Bullen. Richard W. 
Rene, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 48, 
FITCHBURG, MASS. 

Thibaudeau, Clovis 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

O'Toole, Peter L. 
Thorne, William V. 

L.U. NO. 53, 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 

Farrevag, Einar 
Swee, Annar 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Park, Fred S. 
Stambaugh, P. D. 

L.U. NO. 71, 

FT. SMITH, ARK. 

Benge, Bill 
Lile, William A. 
Vernon, R. T. 

L.U. NO. 88, 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Carron, Henry F. 
Stevenson, James 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Brandenburg, Charles 
Flowers, Delmer 
Kilduff, William E. 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZLETON, PA. 

Bubrowski, Alex W. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Gilbert, Beverly J. 
Walker, E. H. 

L.U. NO. 144, 
MACON, GA. 

Henry, J. B. 

L.U. NO. 166, 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

DeHaven, Earl O. 

L.U. NO. 176 
NEWPORT, R. I. 

Barry, Lawrence J. 
Weiss, Carl E. 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Skaathun, John 
Struve, William H. 

L.U. NO. 183, 
PEORIA, ILL. 

Barthell, Henry 
Delicath, Theo 
Giedd, John 
Huckins, William 
Hunt, George L. 
Icenogle, Floyd 
Johnson, Victor 
Korta, Louis 



Lovekamp, Walter 
Meyers, C. Theo 
O'Neill, V. L. 
Wilson, L. H. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Adair, Carl 
Culpepper, A. R. 
Spears, H. W., Sr. 

LU. NO. 225 
ATLANTA, GA. 

Allen, James A. 
Anthony, W. E. 
Bishop, Cooper T. 
Burnett, Verlon D. 
Darby, Donnie C. 
Gibson, James 
Graves, John L. 
Grellman, Victor 
Lively, A. E. 
Palmer, Billy D. 
Phillips, C. E. 
Swink, William J. 
Tharp, Roy 
Vaughn, William C. 
Walker, William L. 
Wallace, Ormond 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Lauritzen, Alfred E. 
Skinner, George T. 

L.U. NO. 242, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Hlavacek, Howard 
Marsin, Robert 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Nemeroff, Nathan 
Takacs, Michael 

L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Coyer, Anthony 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N. Y. 

Lemke, Herbert 

L.U. NO. 283, 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Proctor, Roy 
Riley, J. M. 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Hosier, G. Hummel 

L.U. NO. 308, 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 

Paseka, Louis 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Dougherty, C. M. 
Keith, Orval A. 

L.U. NO. 350, 



L.U. NO. 414. 
NANTICOKE, PA. 

Romanowski, Stanley 

L.U. NO. 532, 
ELMIRA, N. Y. 

Farley, James E. 
Mallory, Willis 
Seibert, George 

L.U. NO. 579, 

ST. JOHN'S NFLD. 

Clarke, Malcolm Robert 

L.U. NO. 599, 
HAMMOND, IND. 

Blair, Harry 
Bly, Roy 
Carr, William 
Coombes, Charles 
DeMarti, Frank 
Frisch, Paul 
Guss, William 
Helm, John 
Kestner, Patrick 
Kovach, William 
Pendoski, Edward 
Vacendak, Michael 
Volker, Albert 
Wade, Arvin 
Witter, Edson 

L.U. NO. 608, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Grant, Albert 
Levin, Louis 
Meditz, Joseph 
Paullow, Peter 
Steingisser, David 

L.U. NO. 642, 
RICHMOND, CALIF. 

Azevedo, Joseph R. 
Barthman Clarence 
Bray, Laverne N. 
Becker, B. G. 
Carlund, Melvyn 
Chauvin, Sidney L. 
Dearhart, John B. 
Durnal, Arthur 
Hampton, E. V. 
Lawrence, Harley V. 
Materne, Nat 
Stewart, B. B. 

L.U. NO. 740, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Bauersfeld, John 
Cahill, Vincent, Sr. 
Doran, Mathew 
Huppert, Daniel 
Mahan, Joseph 
Millhaupt, Frederick 
Regan, Patrick 
Schink, Charles 
Staats, John 
Turnbull, Frederick 

L.U. NO. 787, 



NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Poinelli, John 

L.U. NO. 362, 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Howard, Chester 



Jensen, Jens B. 
Laken, Joseph 
Peterson, Arthur W. 
Rosa, Mario 
Ruditsky, Sam 



L.U. NO. 950, 
LYNBROOK, N .Y. 

Sinda, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 971, 
RENO, NEV. 

Boldra, Lowran 
Doolittle, Vernon 
Rynes, Ira 

L.U. NO. 1108, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Andrako, Joseph 
Armbruster, Earl 
Baldwin, Warren 
Bowman, Silas 
Bruendel, Ernest 
Flury, George 
Gamble, Thomas 
Hill, Frank 
Juhasz, George 
Lewis, Albert 
McCabe, Edward 
Roth, Martin 
Reitenbach, Albert 
Sauter, Paul 
Sweeny, John 
Wedgeworth, William 
Wojciechowski, James 

L.U. NO. 1143, 

LA CROSSE, WISC. 

Huettle, Claude 
Preeshl, Charles 

L.U. NO. 1164, 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Cappiello, Patrick 
Desantis, Joseph 
Graf, Joseph 
Grodzicky, Teddy 
Levine, Louis 
Muller James C. 
Nemirowsky, Isaac 
Stoeber, Herman 

L.U. NO. 1332, 
GRAND COULEE, 
WASH. 

Angell, Norman 

L.U. NO. 1365, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Barwidi, John 
Hoegler, Joseph 
LaBane, John 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N. Y. 

Carter Sylvester P. 
Desmond Patrick 
Hendrickson Linus, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1471, 
JACKSON, MISS. 

Beavers, Bryon M. 
Davidson, Earl B. 
Germany, R. L. 
Harper, G. C. 
Jackson, E. L. 
Jayroe, W. A. 
Johns, Wilbur 
Johnson, Tommy 
McKay, M. H. 
Nutt, Clyde 



36 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1541, 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 

Powell, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 1571, 
SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Allen, Glenn M. 
Amdahl, Ben 
Ansell, Morris 
Bachman, H. C. 
Barber, J. A. 
Box, Vernon E. 
Cassatt, M. J. 
Chapman, John H. 
Clark, John E. 
Chilcote, R. E. 
Bryson, William 
Dean, W. B. 
Dickens, Ben L. 
Dowell, Lloyd H. 
Edwards, C. W. 
Elliott, C. W. 
Elliott, Arlie W. 
Fraser, Robert A. 
Garcia, Albert 
Gay, W. I. 
Hallmark, Hallon J. 
Holcomb, G. L. 
Jack, Guy C. 
Johnson, Ray H. 
Johnson, Walter F. 
Knotts, James 
Lake, Howard F. 
Lane, Sam 
Laney, Edward V. 
Leach, G. W. 
Leaman, Harvey N. 
Ludwig, Emil 
MacDonald, James 
McGettigan, Robert J. 
MacLachlan, G. E. 
Mallek, George 
Matzener, Melvin 
Martin, Richard H, 
Miles, Amasa L. 
Montgomery, Clarence E. 
Moore, Eugene D. 
Murker, Walter A. 



Neal, Raymon L. 
Paxton, Alfred C. 
Peterson, H. G. 
Peterson, Raymond C. 
Philip, Martin 
Quinn, Eddy F. 
Robinson, Frank P. 
Roggers, Ralph S. 
Siebert. Charles H. 
Sims. Carl E. 
Simpson, Don 
Soil, Loraine G. 
Stencel, Frank W. 
Stillwell, Geoffrey A. 
Stone, George L. 
Symonds, Bernard C. 
Tosches. Louis Paul 
Tracey. Patrick R. 
Van Dort, Tom 
Waits, C. C. 
Willimott, William H. 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Sellors, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Story, L. D. 

L.U. NO. 1752, 
POMONA, CALIF. 

Clupper, Clifford 
Couzens, Arthur J. 
Hagglund, Hilding 
Houser, Denver L. 
Hubbard, Otis 
Misak, Otto R. 
Miskie, John B. 
Rowlands, Wilbur G. 

L.U. NO. 1772, 
HICKSVILLE, N. Y. 

Knell, Stephen 
Luaksoren, Vilho 
Renaldo, John 

L.U. NO. 1822. 
FT. WORTH, TEX. 

Schobert, Layton 



L.U. NO. 1849, 
PASCO, WASH. 

Basey, I. D. 
Hopper, N. J. 
Marble, Dorman 
Steingrabe, J. "Lew" 

L.U. NO. 1929, 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 

Thompson, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1974 
ELLENSBERG, WASH. 

Lindstrum, Paul 

L.U. NO. 2203. 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Berns, Bernard S. 
Davis, Donald S. 
Marquez, Edward 

L.U. NO. 2217, 
LAKELAND, FLA. 

Arbates, Gus 
Gallison, Max 
Jones, Samuel 
Kalb, Charles 
Matheyn, Charles 
Nichols, L. J. 
Palmer, John C. 
Pollock, J. M. 
Pressley, C. H. 
Thompson, J. C. 
Ward. William C. 
Wiggins, Charles 
Woods, A. R. 

L.U. NO. 2466, 
PEMBROKE, ONT. 

Ziebell, Gus 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Last 
month we erroneously re- 
ported the death of Chester 
J. Nawrocki, Local 211. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Mistakes do 
happen. Our sincere apol- 
ogies. 




STAIRWAY 

CONSTRUCTION 
MADE EASY 

WITH THIS NEWEST BOOK 

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trations and photos, you are shown the 
methods that years of experience have 
proven the easiest, fastest, most practical 
and efficient. 

Even with no previous experience you will 
be able to build a good stair the first time. 
It gives complete, detailed, easy-to-follow 
instructions on how to lay out, cut and build 
a more perfect stair. It shows the basic 
construction methods of all types, including 
winder and circular stairs. 

This is the most complete book on stair 
construction published in the past 30 years. 
Increase your skill and self-confidence now. 
It saves its cost on the first stair built. 

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DOUGLAS FUGITT 

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ORDER TODAY 

Name 

Address 

City 

State Zip Code 



ROOFERS DO A BETTER JOB 

- WITH A SHINGLING HATCHET 
V AND SUPER BAR Z 



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FEBRUARY, 1969 



37 




Send In Your Favorites! Mall To: Plane 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001. 



Gossip, 101 Constitution 
SORRY, NO PAYMENT. 




A Big Drawback 

The football coach of a small col- 
lege was trying to explain away his 
team's disastrous season to a local 
newspaper reporter. "My biggest 
problem with this year's squad was 
that most of my boys were just too 
young and un-coordinated." 

As the reporter remained silent the 
coach added desperately, "Why, as 
a matter of fact, one of my kids on 
the first string was so un-coordinated 
that he couldn't walk and chew gum 
at the same time!" 




Great American Custom 

The refugee couple finally gained 
U.S. citizenship. The husband rushed 
into the kitchen and cried: "Anna! 
At last we are American citizens!" 
"Wonderful!" replied his wife. "Now 
you can do the dishes!" 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Just Horsing Around 

The baseball manager hurting for 
a win discovered a trick horse who 
could hit the ball a mile. In a crucial 
game with the score tied in the last 
of the ninth, he put the horse in as 
a pinch hitter. On the first pitch, the 
horse swung and knocked the ball out 
of sight. Then it just stood at home 
plate. "Run! run!" cried the manager. 
"Don't be crazy!" replied the nag. 
"If I could run I'd be out at Santa 
Anita!" 



Jarred the Maharajah 

A maharajah issued an order to 
the people of his province that no 
wild animals could be killed. Soon 
man-eating tigers, panthers, and boars 
were endangering the people, who 
then rose up and threw out the maha- 
rajah. 

This is known to be the first time 
where the reign was called because 
of the game. 

— Walter Martynon, Livonia, Mich. 

BUY UNION-MADE TOOLS 

Doggone Good Retriever! 

Every time the hunter shot a duck 
his dog would retrieve the bird by 
walking on top of the water. After 
the dog made several trips in this 
manner, the hunter said proudly to 
an onlooking oldtimer: "Did you no- 
tice anything unusual about my dog?" 

"Sure did," the oldtimer answered. 
"He can't swim." 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

Grass-fed? 

The professor grimly eyed the class 
as he prepared to return a batch of 
examination papers. "You will remain 
seated while they are passed out," he 
commanded. "If you were to stand, 
it is conceivable you might accidently 
form a circle — which would make me 
liable for arrest." 

"Why?" chorused several voices, 
nibbling at the bait. 

"For maintaining a dope ring." 



This Month's Limerick 

A gal editor by name of McSquirt 
Always thought she looked good in 
a skirt. 
But it's possible this Susie 
Is pulling a floosey 
And is a man just wearing a stuffed 
shirt! 

— Katie McGauqhey, 
Wheatridge, Colo. 



Right to the Points! 

Mrs. McTavish looked out the win- 
dow as the family was going to sit 
down to dinner and wailed, "Oh, 
Jon, here comes company, and I bet 
they haven't eaten yet." 

"Ouick!" ordered the Scotsman. 
"Everybody out on the porch with 
toothpicks." 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP AND SAFE 




The Ultimate Retort 

Two English schoolboys grew up 
bitter enemies. One became a stout 
Bishop while the other became a gold- 
bedecked Admiral. They met one 
morning on a railroad platform. The 
Bishop went up to the Admiral, re- 
splendent in his gold braid, and 
asked: "Stationmaster, when will the 
next train leave for Oxford?" With- 
out batting an eye, the Admiral shot 
back: "At 9 o'clock, madam. But 
should you be traveling in your con- 
dition?" 

PATRONIZE UNION STORES 

Penniless Diplomat 

She: "You seem to be an able- 
bodied man. You ought to be strong 
enough to work." 

Hobo: "I know, mum. And you seem 
to be beautiful enough to go on the 
stage, but evidently you prefer the 
simple life." 

She: "Step into the kitchen, and 
I'll see if I can't stir up a meal for 
you." 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS 



John R. Sawdon of Local Union 13, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home December 2, 
1968. 

Andrew J. Peterson of Local Union 257, New York, N. Y., arrived at the Home 
December 6, 1968. 

James J. Shanley of Local Union 1397, North Hempstead, (Roslyn), N. Y., arrived 
at the Home December 18, 1968. 

John Lehner of Local Union 242, Chicago. 111., arrived at the Home December 30. 
1968. 

Andrew Oberg of Local Union 13, Chicago, 111., passed away December 6, 1968. 
Burial was at Chicago. 

Thomas W. Bean of Local Union 132. Washington, D. C, passed away December 7, 
1968, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Edward Blankenship of Local Union 993. Miami, Fla., passed away December 27, 
1968, and was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Members who visited the Home during December 1968: 



George W. Penneman. Holmes Beach, 

Fla. 
P. M. Brooks, Los Altos, Calif. 
Donald Swuier, Jackson. Mich. 
James W. Capethorne. Framingham, 

Mass. 
George Carlson. Roslyn. N. Y. 
John Johnson, St. Petersburg. Fla. 
John E. Johnson. New York. N. Y. 
Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Redman. Chicago, 

111. 
Mr. & Mrs. H. S. Kaufman, Baltimore, 

Md. 
Mr. & Mrs. H. W. Belew, Huntingdon. 

Tenn. 
Matthew J. Florek. Milwaukee. Wis. 
George Park, Washington. D. C. 
Hugo Johnson & Wife. Oak Lawn. III. 
E. V. Johnson & Wife, Washington, D. C. 

& Clearwater. Fla. 
John A. Lang. Katonah, N. Y. 
H. W. Snelgrove, Miami, Fla. 
Emil Loisel, Warren. Mich. 
Arthur W. Daniles. Los Alamitos, Calif. 



Jos. Huizdak, formerly of Greenwich, 

Conn.. Orlando, Fla. 
Charles Piedgriyer. New York 
Adelbert O. Rarick, Watertown, N. Y. 
Woldemar Haerda. Downers Grove, 

Illinois. 
Harry Bendell. Hartford. Conn. 
Rudolph Weiss. Jersey City. N. J. 
Louis Home & Wife, Wheaton, III. 
Knute Sandstrom, St. Paul. Minn. 
George Pack. Winston Salem. N. C. 
Howard Pack, Winston Salem, N. C. 
Angelo Ferro & Wife, Chicago. 111. 
Henry Fassnacht & Wife. L. I. City, N. Y. 
Sam C. Jones & Family, Salem. 111. 
Grant W. Welles, Evansville. Ind. 
John F. Rogers, St. Louis, Mo. 
Wayne L. Walters. Defiance, Ohio 
Preston P. Pine, Emporia. Kans. 
Owen Bealht. Muskegon. Mich. 
R. J. Williams, Anaheim. Calif. 
Charles N. Brown, Seattle. Wash. 
Howard Endies. Kankakee. 111. 
Clyde Eldred. Grand Rapids. Mich. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 



Audel. Theodore 39 

Belsaw Power Tools 35 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 23 

CARE 28 

Chicago Technical College 20 

Craftsman Book Co 13 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 39 

Estwing Manufacturing 24 

Foley Manufacturing 27 

Fugitt, Douglas 37 



Goldblatt Tool Co 35 

Hydrolevel 25 

Irwin Auger Bit 25 

Lee, H. D 13 

Locksmithing Institute 23 

North American School of Drafting . . 29 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

Traffic Safety 28 

Vaughan and Bushnell 37 



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FEBRUARY, 1969 



39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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'One Nation . . . Indivisible' 



■ In his inaugural address, last month, President 
Nixon emphasized the theme which dominated his 
whole campaign, namely, that the nation must be 
unified and made whole again. Certainly, no one 
can find fault with such a goal. 

For too long there has been a growing rift be- 
tween young and old, black and white, rich and 
poor. We are in real danger of forfeiting that part 
of the Pledge of Allegiance which says "one na- 
tion . . . indivisible." This must not be allowed to 
happen. 

Admittedly, there are injustices and short 
comings in our system. There are people who are 
shortchanged in one way or another. But, on the 
whole, we have achieved a system which affords 
more people more opportunity for shaping their 
own destiny than any other government conceived 
by the mind of man. 

We have more built-in avenues for correcting 
injustices and redressing grievances than any other 
nation on earth. Yet all this may be lost, if the 
purveyors of hate and the preachers of revolution 
are allowed to poison the minds of the susceptible 
on the college campuses, in our cities, and particu- 
larly in our ghettos. 

There needs to be a passion for justice and a 
willingness to correct inequities through evolution 
rather than revolution. One of the unfortunate 
aspects of the situation today is that too many 
people hesitate "getting involved." 

The most horrible example of this was an in- 



cident in New York a few years ago when dozens 
of people watched a woman being stabbed to 
death without anyone even bothering to call the 
police because he might get involved. 

On the campuses of the nation the 90% or 
95% of the students who want to get an educa- 
tion allow the 5% or 10% who make up the 
super militant to create havoc and force the closure 
of the school. This sort of failure to get involved 
is not peculiar to our colleges. In all sorts of 
organizations and institutions, including unions, 
it is becoming increasingly difficult to get volun- 
teers to serve on committees or make contribu- 
tions of time or talent. Everyone is too busy or 
too tired, or too young, or too old. The Com- 
munist Bloc countries insist that we in America 
have become too fat, too affluent, and too wrapped 
up in our own personal comforts to endure for 
very long. 

I believe that this is only wishful thinking on 
their part, but I feel that this growing inclination 
to avoid getting involved is a step in the wrong 
direction. The Communist World is dedicated to 
our destruction. So are the homegrown hippies 
of the New Left. Therefore, we are involved, 
whether we do anything or not. By standing up 
for those things which have served us so well for 
so many years, we can help to preserve the free- 
dom and liberty which are the foundation of our 
system. On the other hand, if we refuse to get 
involved, we make it easier for those who are 
bent on bringing us to our knees. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




Are you 
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Heart 

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1 YES NO 

j DD 


1 Are you overweight? 

If you're 30% overweight, you run 
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middle age. 




YES NO 

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If you smoke more than one pack of 
cigarettes a day, your heart-attack 
risk could be 2 to 3 times greater 
than a non-smoker's. 


i □ □ 


2 Are you eating your way to heart 
attack? 

You may be if your diet is too rich 
in saturated fat and cholesterol. 




DD 


5 Are you physically fit? 

Regular, moderate exercise im- 
proves circulation, strengthens the 
heart. 


| □ □ 


3 Is your blood pressure high? 

Ask your doctor. The higher your 
blood pressure, the higher your 
risk of heart attack. 




DD 


6 Do you dodge your doctor? 

Don't. See him regularly. Let him 
help you cut your risks. 



Another way to reduce your risk 
is to help expand the life-saving 
programs of your Heart Association. 



GIVE... 

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P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest hand tools. 



MARCH, 1969 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA* FOUNDED 1881 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovttch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(^MPHKru" 





VOLUME LXXXVIII 



Nc 



MARCH, 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

The Building of Yesteryear's Wooden Ships 2 

Mystic, Conn., Old Ship's Haven of Rest 6 

Bath, Me., Shipbuilding Port 7 

Job Corps Center in Hawaii Added to Program 9 

The Air We Breathe, The Water We Drink . . Sen. Edmund Muskie 10 

Union Sky-Jumpers 12 

The Carpenter's Cupboard Shirley Stowell 15 

'Work' Law Lobby Seeks to Exploit Poorer Workers 16 

CLIC Contributions, 1968 Campaign 25 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 8 

Editorials 14 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 17 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 18 

Plane Gossip 21 

Local Union News 24 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 28 

In Memoriam 30 

Service to the Brotherhood 32 

Lakeland News 38 

Of Interest to Our Industrial Locals 40 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 357? should bo sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. Washington. D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at BIO Rhode Island Ave., N.E., Washington. D. C. 20018. by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20s in advance. 

Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Gracing the cover of the March 
issue of The Carpenter is a picture of 
the last of the great whaling ships. 
The Charles W. Morgan. The vessel 
is shown at her mooring place at 
Mystic Seaport. Connecticut. 

The Morgan is one of the best 
existing examples of fine workman- 
ship by American's early ship's car- 
penters. Her construction 128 years 
ago was marked by a carpenters" 
walkout which resulted in an impor- 
tant change in the working conditions 
of these master craftsmen. Keel was 
laid for the vessel at New Bedford. 
Mass., in January, 1841. but construc- 
tion came to a halt in April when 
the carpenters left their jobs in pro- 
test against "sunrise to sunset" hours 
prevalent in that time. Work was 
resumed in May of the same year 
with an unprecedented 1 (Hi -hour 
workday, forever changing conditions 
for tradesmen in New England. 

The ship was launched later in 
1841, and the construction account 
books exist today, noting the size and 
cost of every timber, breast hook and 
copper bolt. The present condition of 
the Charles W. Morgan bears testi- 
mony of the skill employed by the 
ships' carpenters 128 years ago. 

The vessel is a veteran of 37 long 
whaling expeditions spread over a 
span of 80 years and the Seven Seas. 

The whaleship is now a beautifully- 
preserved "living museum." tied up 
alongside other great relics of Ameri- 
can sailing supremacy. 





Interior of the Ship 



CRAFTSMEN FOI 




f all the master craftsmen 
among the carpentry trade 
in America, probably no 
group has enjoyed higher 
esteem than the shipwrights and join- 
ers. In the 18th and 19th Centuries, 
ships' carpenters literally carved out 
a niche in history for American wood- 
en boat builders which brought fame 
and fortune to New England ship- 
yards. 

Dating back before the Revolu- 
tionary War, the Yankee ships' car- 
penters had earned the respect of 
wooden boat buyers and ship captains 
the world over. In the stormy years 
of the early 1800's, warring nations 
of Europe also learned that the re- 
bellious colonists could turn out some 
pretty mean warships. Later came 
the fastest of all sailing merchant 
vessels, the clipper ships. 

The virgin forests of pine, oak, 
cedar, elm and locust in the New 
World provided the finest lumber from 
which carpenters chopped, sawed and 
carved each plank and timber to pre- 
cise specifications. There were no 



sawmills or power tools with which 
to work. Most often, trees were 
selected for specific ship's parts; car- 
penters would cut the trees only after 
carefully calculating the number of 
knees, crosspieces, futtocks and plank 
needed for a particular vessel under 
construction. 

Timbers Cut to Fit 

The many wooden components 
which were assembled into a single 
vessel were accurately cut to sizes that 
were carefully laid out on a naval 
architect's construction drawings. Con- 
struction drawings came at the end 
of a long series of models and sheer 
drawings developed by the architect. 
From the sheer drawings (made up 
of sheer plan, half-breadth plan and 
body plan) were devised the construc- 
tion drawings, which showed the 
exact position of every part in the 
ship. The carpenters — using these 
drawings — cut and shaped each part 
accordingly, so that when it was 
brought into place on the ship's frame, 
it fitted with little or no modification. 



The manner in which a shipyard 
for early wooden ships functioned is 
a classic example of teamwork. There 
were teams of axemen, sawyers, fitters 
and joiners, who were assisted by 
other craftsmen in the trades of black- 
smithing, coppersmithing, spar-making, 
sailmaking and rigging. 

On entering a New England ship- 
yard of the 18th century, one would 
be immediately attracted to the army 
of carpenters intent on diminishing 
the size and altering the shape of huge 
logs and lean saplings. Each carpen- 
ter wielded an axe or adz designed 
to perform specific tasks on different 
kinds of wood. It would not be un- 
usual to see children wandering among 
the working axemen, picking up chips 
to feed the fireplaces of nearby cot- 
tages. 

In a shed located near the axemen 
was another team of carpenters called 
the sawyers. Half the group, called 
the bottom sawyers, were located in 
a pit — seemingly covered with logs 
and planks — who worked in close 

THE CARPENTER 



Skilled 

craftsmen 

produced 

the sailing 

vessels 

of 

yesteryear 



of damage to the ship's bottom should 
it run aground. 

Next, the keel was laid, composed 
of several pieces of timber doweled 
together to form a single piece the full 
length of the ship and measuring up 
to two-feet square. The stem was 
then assembled of the strongest and 
most solid oak available. It may be 
that many pieces of oak, doweled to- 
gether and then bolted, would be nec- 
essary to form the mighty stem, con- 
sidered by shipwrights the most im- 
portant part of the ship. 

Another group of carpenters was 
busy at the opposite end of the ship, 
raising the stern-post, made of solid 
oak. This was affixed by precision 
mortising in the keel and matching 
teeth in the post. If possible, the stern- 
post was made of a single piece of 
wood. 

Between the stem and stern-post 
rose the ship's framing, composed of 
a whole family of cross-pieces, fut- 
tocks (hooked timbers making the 
rib), top-timbers, short and long armed 
floors and other components. All 



these pieces were secured in place 
by shoring — or temporary timbers to 
hold parts in place until the shell was 
built around the frame. 

Making the Vessel Strong 

Giving longitudinal strength to the 
ship were the keelsons, rising alongside 
the keel from stem to stern. These 
were secured by copper bolts driven 
through the floor and keel, and by 
wooden dowels to the floor. The keel- 
sons act as a means of securing the 
floors in their proper places. 

Then, between the futtocks went 
additional timbers to close the spaces 
below the water line so that the ship 
may remain watertight should outer 
planking be torn off. 

Bands of iron braced or trussed 
the ship to give internal strength. 
These strips of iron — three to six 
inches wide — ran across the timbers 
at right angles from the side keelsons 
to the upper timbers. 

With the frame up, the carpenters 
went about the business of "drawing 



MIGHTY SHIPS 



harmony with the top sawyers above, 
pulling big-tooth saws back and forth 
all day long. 

Still another group, situated near 
the blacksmith's shop, tended the 
steam box. Here, pieces of timber 
were made flexible for bending into 
intricate curves through a half-hour 
steaming inside the 30-foot-long en- 
closure. 

Birth of a Ship 

Were we to arrive on the scene at 
the very beginning of a ship's con- 
struction, we'd find carefully laid-out 
blocks assembled on the spot at 
which the entire vessel will soon rest. 
These blocks were placed so that the 
ship rested on a slight incline — 5/8th 
of an inch per foot of length — for 
the purpose of launching. 

On these blocks were to be laid the 
first, or false keel, of wood pieces 
(probably water-seasoned elm) meas- 
uring 4 to 6-inches in thickness. Pur- 
pose of the false keel was to prevent 
the ship from sliding leeward off 
course in the wind and for lessening 

MARCH, 1969 





The Steam-Chest 

the skin" over the ribs of the ship's 
skeleton. Limber strakes or ceiling 
went on as inside planking — fitted as 
tightly as the outer shell to make it 
impervious to water, should the out- 
side planking fail. 

Construction of a wooden ship was 
directed by the yard's master-builder. 
Before the outer planking was applied, 
all work came to a halt and the mas- 
ter-builder determined if the frame 
stood true. If not, the shores and 
ribbons were adjusted to achieve 
plumb-line accuracy. 

"Drawing the Skin" 

The laying of outside planks which 
followed was given extreme care by 
the best of the shipwrights. Any error 
in selecting the material, or in bend- 
ing it wrongly, could cause splits or 
bruises that eventually, by decay, 
stress or leakage, might endanger the 
overall strength and safety of the ship. 

The outside planking varied in 
thickness from four to 10-inches, with 
the thickest positioned just above the 
water line. As the planking was laid 
near the stem or stern, it was thinned 
off to permit easier bending and fitting 
to the curves and to the rabbet of the 
stem and stern-post. 

The planking was fastened to the 
futtocks with wooden pegs of locust, 
called trunnels (an abstraction of the 
word tree-nails). Holes were bored 
several days prior to the driving of 
the trunnels, so that sap in the wood 
might thoroughly dry. By double fast- 
ening — alternate driving of one and 
two trunnels into each futtock — the 
planks were tightly secured. The trun- 
nels were then sawed off flush with 
the planks. 

Following completion of the outer 
skin, timbers were laid to unite the 
vessel from stem to stern where the 
floors do not cross the keel. These 
are called breast-hooks, in the forward 
part, and crutches, in the aft section. 
They were fitted upon the keel and 
bolted to the side timbers. They 
formed a part of the general system 



of strengthening the ship, and are 
constructed of timber or iron. 

Framing of the deck followed, at 
which time the carpenters took great 
pains to "skin" the plank well and 
carefully, avoiding all flaws and strains 
so that the decks would be perfectly 
tight and free from springing or strain- 
ing from fastenings. Construction of 
sub-decks followed as dictated by the 
size of the ship. 

Great care was always taken in 
choosing the wood for the rudder 
(usually of oak or elm), and in the 
construction of the sole-piece, a 6- 
inch thick plank below the rudder 
for protective purposes. The ship- 
wrights also took great pride in the 
construction and decoration of the 
wheel, the barrel, the tiller and asso- 
ciated wooden pieces used to guide 
the vessel. 

Work of Ship's Carver 

Away from the scene of ship con- 
struction, the ship's carver has prob- 
ably labored for months on the wood- 
en figurehead and other art-in-wood 
that will adorn above-deck (as found 




in stern and taffrail decorations) sec- 
tions. The figureheads were likenesses 
of animals or birds, fair maidens, 
coats of arm, or other images sugges- 
tive of the ship's name, its owners, 
or of the particular trade in which 
the vessel was to be involved. Certain 
areas of New England chose parti- 
cular carving styles or shapes which 
became permanently associated with 
the region. A boat built in Chesa- 
peake Bay yards, for example, would 
almost certainly have elaborately 




THE CARPENTER 



carved and painted "long heads." 
Other shipyard communities developed 
different forms. 

The launching of a completed ves- 
sel was indeed a great day, then as 
now. Carpenters and other crafts- 
men, townspeople and delegations of 
important people representing the 
ship's owners gathered amid banners 
and streamers to celebrate. Follow- 
ing the traditional christening, a single 
dog-shore was pulled and the new ship 
slid down the soft-soaped bilge-ways 
to its watery home. 

Carpenters continued to work above 
and below decks following the christ- 
ening for several weeks. Even after 
the ship was turned over to the owner 
and a few voyages were made, it was 
returned to the yard for calking and 
for coatings of pitch and marine glue. 
Then, and only then, was the ship's 
construction considered complete. 

The test of the carpenters' mettle 
is in the longevity of productive life 
contained in these American-made 
vessels. There are still a number of 
ships more than 100 years old, resting 
at various mooring places up and 
down the East Coast, many of which 
are in surprisingly good condition. 

On the cover of this issue of The 
Carpenter is the 128-year-old whale- 
ship Charles W. Morgan which was 
built in New Bedford, Mass., yards 
and is now resting at Mystic Seaport, 
Connecticut. 

To be found in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, not far from her construction 
site, is the restored frigate Constella- 
tion. This vessel, launched in 1797, 
was the veteran of several American 
wars, and was still in U.S. Naval 
Academy training service 100 years 
later. In 1940, President Franklin 
Roosevelt ordered that the old ship be 
refitted, and had her commissioned as 
flagship of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet — 
at the age of 143 years! 

The carpenters which built the ships 
that gave America its sailing suprem- 
acy have long since departed, but the 
reputation of these master craftsmen 
remains. ■ 

The engravings accompanying the article 
above are from Harper's New Monthly 
Magazine, Volume XXIV, No. 143, 
April I, 1862. 



^T T Y^y^m uuvvnint^ 



The following local unions of the Unilcd 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America still engage in shipbuilding or ship 
repairs of one form or another: 

Shipwrights and Joiners Local 2151, 
Charleston, S.C.; Shipwrights Local 1856, 
Philadelphia, Pa.; Navy Yard Employees 
Local 1728, Philadelphia, Pa.: Shipwrights. 
Ship Carpenters, Calkcrs, Joiners, Boat 
Builders Local 1509. Miami, Fla.; Pleasure 
Yachts and Boat Builders Local 2712, Pom- 




Though the mighty wooden ships of yesteryear ply the Seven Seas no 
more, ocean vessels of today continue to inspire man. The two young- 
sters above, photographed by Orville Andrews of Cupertino, Calif., have 
what John Masefield describes in the familiar poem below: 



SEA-FEVER 

I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, 
And all I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by; 
And the wheel's kick and the wind's song and the white sail's shaking, 
And a gray mist on the sea's face, and a gray dawn breaking. 

I must go down to the seas again, for the call of the runn 

Is a wild call and a clear call that may not be denied; 

And all I ask is a windy day with the white clouds flying, 

And the flung spray and the blown spume, and the sea-gulls crying. 

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life, 
To the gull's way and the whale's way, where the wind's like a 

whetted knife; 
And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, 
And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick's over. 

JOHN MASEFIELD 



assrmsresssssss 




pano Beach, Fla.: Ship Carpenters Local 
1302, New London. Conn.; Shipwrights. 
Joiners. Boat Builders. Box Makers Local 
1026, San Francisco, Calif.: Shipwrights. 
Joiners, Boatbuilders Local 1068, Vallejo, 
Calif.; Shipwrights. Joiners. Boatbuilders 
Local 1149, San Francisco. Calif.; Ship 
Carpenters, Joiners and Calkers Local 1335. 
Wilmington, Calif.: Boat Builders Local 
1300, San Diego, Calif.: Ship Carpenters and 
Calkers. 584. New Orleans. La.: Boat Build- 
ers Local 2811, Salisbury. Md.: Joiners, Ship 
Carpenters. Calkers, ami Millmen 1 ocal 
2468, Quincy. Mass.; Boat Builders Local 
2392. Cadillac. Mich.; Ship Carpenters. Boat 
Builders and Calkers local 1175. Kingston. 
N.Y.; Ships Carpenters Local 2291, Lorain, 
O.: Shipwrights. Joiners. Boat Builders anil 
Calkers Local 2419. Astoria. Ore.; Ship- 
wrights and Joiners Local 1020, Portland. 



Ore.: Ship Calkcrs Local 2218. Portland, 
Ore.; Navy Yard Local 1086. Portsmouth- 
Norfolk. Va.; Shipwrights and Boat Builders 
Local 2317. Bremerton, Wash.; Ship Car- 
penters and Calkers Local 1148. Olympia. 
Wash.; Shipwrights Local 1184. Seattle, 
Wash.; Shipwrights. Joiners. Boat Builders, 
Millmen Local 1532, Anacortes, Wash.; Ship- 
wrights. Joiners, Calkers I ocal 2071. Belling- 
ham. Wash.; Ship Carpenters. Joiners. Calk- 
ers Local 2073. Milwaukee, Wis.; Boat Build- 
ers local 3051. Shell Lake. Wis.; Ship- 
wrights. Joiners. Calkcrs. Boat Builders Local 
506, Vancouver. B.C.; Shipwrights and Calk- 
ers local 159S. Victoria, B.C.: and Ship 
Carpenters 1 ocal S40. St. John. New Bruns- 
wick. 

Editor's Sole: If ire tunc overlooked a 
local union in this listing, please forgive us 
. . . ami let us Know alumt it. 



MARCH, 1969 



FOR BOAT BUFFS . . . 



Where to Go, What to See 



<t> <1> <t> <t> <1> <t> ^1> <1> <l> <I> <l> <t> <i> <i> <i> <i> <i> <j> 



SHIPS' HAVEN OF REST 

MYSTIC, CONNECTICUT 

■ Connecticut Yankees along the Mystic River are 
clinging to the last fragments of a glorious shipbuilding 
past. Moored at Mystic Seaport are several specimens 
of the fine art of wooden shipbuilding. Restoring and 
maintaining these water-bound relics of the past is a com- 
munity dedicated to performing these functions in much 
the same way it was done in New England in the early 
18th Century. 

Craftsmen (attired in dress appropriate during the Ameri- 
can Revolutionary War) go about their ship-tending tasks 
amid centuries-old buildings, using tools of the same 
vintage. 

Mystic Seaport is maintained by the Marine Historical 
Association. The group has, since its inception in 1929, 
restored a number of buildings and acquired more than 
100 sailing vessels — ranging from large square-rigged 
whaleships to small fishing, work and pleasure boats. 

In the restored buildings and ships, craftsmen seek 
to duplicate working conditions, tools and techniques used 
to construct and recondition artifacts of the past. There 
are, for example: A complete shipyard (situated on the 



site of one established two centuries ago), spar shed, rope- 
walk, ship's carver, cooperage, sail and rigging lofts, ship 
chandlery, shipsmith shop, and mast hoops and ship fittings 
shops. 

Other buildings at Mystic Seaport (most dating to the 
18th or early 19th centuries) house priceless marine ex- 
hibits, marine art, a planetarium emphasizing the role of 
celestial navigation, and various museums, ship's docking 
facilities, yacht club, chapel, and tavern. 

Afloat in the seaport are: the largest existing whaleship, 
Charles W . Morgan, built in 1841; the Arctic expedition 
schooner Bowdoin; a 65-foot ketch Gundel dating to 1893; 
the Copenhagen-made, full-rigged ship Joseph Conrad, 
built in 1882; and several other vessels of maritime 
distinction. These ships are usually open for inspection 
to Mystic visitors and provide valuable insight into ship 
construction and the craftsmanship of the men who built 
them. 

The crafts shops and buildings that surround the ships' 
mooring place are actually used to maintain the old vessels 
left in the care of the Marine Historical Association. These 
facilities are normally in operation and open to the public 
during the summer months; the museums, several of the 
major vessels, and most building areas are open the year 
around. ■ 



^\t/^J/^^\J> ^J/^'^^vI/^t'^J/^t)^^^^ 



THE MARINERS MUSEUM 

NEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA 

The Mariners Museum, founded and endowed by Archer M. 
Huntington, contains a comprehensive collection of material 
on naval and merchant ships of all nations. Exhibits include 
figureheads, navigational instruments, whaling equipment, full- 
sized small watercraft, lighthouse and lifesaving material, and 
many ship models. An outstanding exhibit is the exquisite 
Crabtree Collection of Miniature Ships. Special exhibitions are 
held frequently. The "Chesapeake Bay Exhibitions," is an 
example. There are over 10,000 prints and paintings in the 
collection. A research library contains over 35,000 books and 
pamphlets and 60,000 photographs. 

The Museum is located in an 800-acre park in Newport 
News, just off Route 60, about 6 miles north of Newport 
News. It is open 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. on week days and 2 P.M. 
to 5 P.M. on Sundays. Admission is free. 




THE CARPENTER 



SHIPS FOR THE GREAT DAYS OF SAIL 

BATH, MAINE 



■ In a country as young as ours, 
every shred of history seems impor- 
tant. Sometimes it is overemphasized, 
and sometimes not, but for any man 
who has a deep sensitivity for the 
beauty of wood, a sense of kinship 
with the sea, and a stirring of Amer- 
ican pride, the shipbuilding port of 
Bath, Maine, will rank as one of the 
foremost shrines in the nation. 

Now populated by "downeastern- 
ers" who derive much of their in- 
come from small town commerce and 
a better-than-average summer resort 
trades, Bath is still an important ship- 
building center. At regular intervals, 
6,000-ton steel guided missile frigates 
slip away from the docks of the Bath 
Iron Works to take their place in the 
fleet. 

At work on these ships are decend- 
ants of some of the earliest Amer- 
ican settlers who made camp on what 
is now Popham Beach, a few miles 
down river from the Iron Works, and 
established a place to make ocean- 
going ships. This was in the early years 
of the 17th century. Thirteen years, in 
fact, before the Pilgrims landed at 
Plymouth Rock. 

Popham, like most of our early 
cities, was an ideal place to anchor 
ships, and to build them. Protected 
by the rocky islets of the rugged 
Maine coast, it is the site of a small 
bay and the juncture of the ocean 
with the Kennebec River. Swift, and 
deep, the Kennebec could accommo- 
date the largest clipper ships, as it 
now does guided missile frigates. As 
the size of the ships grew, the Bath 
yards moved from the beach upriver 
to what is now the heart of the town. 

The area possessed another ingre- 
dient of the shipbuilding industry in 
abundance. Tall timbers of hard- 
woods, toughened by long crackling 
winters, marched inland from the sea 
as far as the eye could see. and much 
of the area is still covered by uncut 
timber. 

The first ocean-going vessel built 
by English-speaking people in the 
United States was launched at Pop- 
ham in 1 607, and since then, the area 
has sent over 5,000 vessels down the 
ways. In the middle of the 1 800s. 
Bath was the fifth largest port in the 
United States, and between 1 S62 and 
1902, almost half of America's sailing 
ships were built and launched there. 
In the 20 years between 1870 and 
1 890 alone — the heyday of the clip- 
per. Bath put 700 bottoms on the seas 



of the world. Among them were many 
names well known to those who fol- 
low the days of wind, sail and rope. 

The Wyoming was the largest 
wooden sailing bark ever to fly the 
American flag in commerce. She 
had six masts. The Aryan was the 
last wooden square-rigger ever built 
in the U.S. The only four-masted, 
steel-hulled barks with a "Made in 
U.S.A." label came from Bath. 

Any town with a past like Bath 
collects memorabilia. Attics are filled 
with old sea chests, drawings, models, 
and other souvenirs. And as the ac- 
tive days of sail slipped past, Bath 
decided to collect the most interesting 
items in one spot, and to concentrate 
on the higher water mark of sail — the 
19th century. In 1964, a building was 
donated to house the collections, and 
the Bath Marine Museum was estab- 
lished. It is located on the "Street of 
the Shipbuilders," where the new for- 
tunes carved out of keel timbers and 
Continued on Page 22 

PICTURES, TOP TO BOTTOM: 

1. Designed for precise alignment of 
holes, this "honing" machine positioned 
a bit either perpendicular or at an angle. 
The ship's carpenter sat on the base to 
steady the tool, and turned twin handles 
geared to the bit. 

2. I runnels, the tapered wooden pegs 
that held the wooden sailing ships to- 
gether, were first driven into the hole, and 
then split. When locked in place with a 
wooden wedge they were in to stay. 

3. Adzes with offset handles made dress- 
ing the timbers easier. Drills often had 
to be turned with ratchet handles (lower 
right) because of close quarters. The drill 
bit at the top is the exception rather than 
the rule! 

4. Hatchets and chisels, too, were essen- 
tial for dressing and fitting raw Maine 
timbers. 

5. A typical ship's carpenter's chest con- 
tains the basics. 





~- ;i 





i # % 





MARCH, 1969 




TOM 




ROUNDUP 



A NEW FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE, well "below the government's own poverty standard, 
went into effect at the end of January for an estimated 1.5 million workers not 
previously covered. 

The expansion extends federal minimum wage protection to an estimated 44 
million persons — more than half the nation's work force — as of February 1. 

But the newly covered workers will be entitled to 30 cents an hour and $12 
a week less in basic pay than those previously covered by law. 

For most workers the minimum wage is $1.60 an hour but for those covered for 
the first time this year it will only be $1.30 an hour. 

Translated into annual pay, assuming the worker is employed a full 52 weeks, 
the $1.30 figure comes to $2,704— considerably less than the government's $3,200 
a year poverty level. 

Practically all the newly covered workers are retail service employees such 
as restaurant, hotel and motel workers. 

YOUTH FARES— The Civil Aeronautics Board will review one of its examiner's 
decision to outlaw "youth fare" prices offered by airlines. The examiner earlier 
ruled that price breaks for youngsters discriminated against full-fare passengers. 
The initial complaint against the fare plans came from the bus industry. Parents 
who send their kids far away to college will feel the effects of any change here. 

CREDIT CARDS— Sen. William Proxmire, Wisconsin Democrat, has proposed legislation 
to regulate the issuance of credit cards to people who do not ask for them. The 
bill provides a series of safeguards to protect an individual from having to pay 
for goods purchased through the unauthorized use of an unordered card issued in 
his name. 

SLUM AID— Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., is studying possible legislation to 
give tax breaks to industries in slum areas. Kennedy said the legislation 
might also provide tax incentives for construction of housing for slum dwellers. 

"ONE OF THE UGLIEST YEARS in American political history," says the Advisory 
Commission on Intergovernmental Relations of the violent year just past. The 
commission, which serves as the official Federal link to state and local govern- 
ment, further states in its annual report that there is now a "growing realization 
...that Washington simply lacks the power, personnel and perspective to heal all 
the nation's ills." The group is pressing for greater cooperation among different 
levels of government in this nation. It is concerned, notes the report, with 
failure to deal with the "welfare morass" and the "financial crisis of central 
city schools" but is encouraged by new efforts by the states to help the cities 
involve citizens — particularly the poor — in changing the "deteriorating urban 
situation. " 

OUT-OF-HOSPITAL DRUG payment for the elderly as an extension of Medicare is an im- 
portant issue shaping up in the 91st Congress. A bill is being prepared for in- 
troduction by Senator Joseph Montoya (D-New Mexico) to accomplish this. Rising 
congressional sentiment favoring such measures was given a boost by former Health, 
Education & Welfare Secretary Wilbur Cohen in his closing days of office. Cohen 
urged passage of a law that would extend Medicare coverage to pay for a large 
group of widely prescribed drugs, on a $1 -deductible basis. 

NAME-AND-ADDRESS RULE-The AFL-CIO urged the Supreme Court to uphold the National 
Labor Relations Board's Excelsior rule requiring employers to give the MLRB 
name-and-address lists of workers before any representation election is held. 

In doing so, the court should "make it clear that the Excelsior rule is a 
proper method for implementing the rights of employes" to discuss and be informed 
about unionization, and the right of unions to inform workers on this subject, 
the federation said in a friend-of-the-court brief. 

8 THE CARPENTER 




Participants in the signing of the revised Job Corps contract were, from left: Robert Knight, administrator of the Hawaii 
Carpenters Training Fund; Stanley S. Yanagi, financial secretary and business representative of Local 745, Honolulu; Ralph 
J. Conroy, associate director, Civilian Conservation Centers, Job Corps; James L. Bacon, center director Koko Head Job Corps 
Civilian Conservation Center, Hawaii; General President H. A. Hutcheson; Congresswoman Patsy Mink of Hawaii; First General 
Vice President Finlay C. Allan; Job Corps Director William P. Kelly; Carl Earles, Chief of State-Related Civilian Conservation 
Centers, Job Corps; and Leo Gable, Brotherhood Technical Director. 

Job Corps Center in Hawaii Added 
To Brotherhood Training Program 



■ The Koko Head Job Corps 
Civilian Conservation Center at 
Honolulu, Hawaii, has been added 
to the United Brotherhood's national 
training program for unemployed 
and disadvantaged young Ameri- 
cans. 

Koko Head, thus, becomes the 
seventh Job Corps Center where 
Corpsman are currently being 
trained in carpentry by Brotherhood 
instructors. 

Brief ceremonies were held Jan- 
uary 28 at the Brotherhood's Gen- 
eral Headquarters in Washington, 
so that an enabling amendment to 
the existing Brotherhood-Job Corps 
contract could be signed. 

The amendment calls for the ex- 
penditure of $109,044.54, of which 
553,000 is presently funded and the 
remainder is to come out of future 
funding. It runs from February 16, 

1969, to June 30, 1969, "with an 
automatic extension to February 16, 

1970, contingent on the Job Corps 
receiving authorization and funding 
beyond the current fiscal year." 

General President Hutcheson ex- 
plained that the training, to be pro- 



CONSERVATIOH 




vided by members of the Union, will 
be in those branches of the carpenter 
trade for which there is an estab- 
lished need for additional manpower 
to meet the requirements of the 
industry. There will be 60 trainees 
in the Koko Head program at all 
times, who will get both classroom 
instruction and on-the-job exper- 
ience in the construction of buildings 
and facilities that would not other- 
wise be let out on contract. 

The training will be coupled with 
a concentrated effort by the United 



Brotherhood of Carpenters and the 
Hawaiian Carpenters Joint Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee to 
provide employment opportunities 
for all carpenter trainees who satis- 
factorily complete the course. Job 
Corpsmen who show aptitudes may 
be guided into existing apprentice- 
ship programs after their Job Corps 
instruction, and will receive credit 
toward their apprenticeship for time 
spent in Job Corps training. They 
will be placed, when possible, in ap- 
prenticeship programs in or near 
their own hometowns. 

Representing the Hawaii Joint 
Apprenticeship and Training Com- 
mittee were Stanley Yanagi. Labor 
Representative of the Committee, 
and Robert Knight. Administrator 
of the Hawaii Carpentry Joint Ap- 
prentice and Training Program. 
They stated that management and 
labor were 100 percent behind this 
program, and its success is depend- 
ent upon the full cooperation of all 
concerned. 

The United Brotherhood began 

its training program in Job Corps 

Centers in mid- 1968, according to 

Continued on Page 22 



MARCH, 1969 




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^ 5 J.i:,' (IfcS i I! !' " ';% Hi |i ,• ,: ;i If ,si , 

b;;!;,,: •; ; ,,| ■; ,• ;; ;; \i\t}^.- <j iSp|j 

: '■ ' ' '/ . ■ ! i te; 



fe s « I " i! ! 



Iff -*-' 







The Air We Breathe, 
The Water We Drink 



By SENATOR EDMUND S. MUSKIE 



| Unfit for human consumption! 
Do not drink this water! No bath- 
ing — beach closed! Are these the 
signs inevitable of a modern indus- 
trial society? Or are they indicators 
of decay, lack of concern, and dis- 
regard for resources? 

Today throughout America these 
signs mark centuries of neglect of our 
water resources. Headlines such as 
"Lake Erie is dying" and "pollution 
takes toll" appear daily across the 
nation. 

And they apply only to our water 
supply. 

Air pollution occurs with increasing 
frequency. Air pollution alert systems 




SENATOR MUSKIE 



*An address by Senator Muskie be- 
fore the Consumer Assembly '69, Wash- 
ington, D.C., January 30, 1969. 



have been established in many of our 
major cities. Emphysema, bronchitis 
and other chronic respiratory diseases 
continue to increase in geometric 
proportions. 

And our landscape is scarred. Land 
developers, highway builders and strip 
miners have laid waste to the country- 
side with little or no regard to erosion 
or siltation control. We abandon our 
litter and bury and burn our garbage 
with little or no thought to the en- 
vironmental effects or to the waste of 
resources. 

The environment we live in is more 
than skies, streams and open spaces. 
Highways and buildings are part of 
modern man's habitat. A highway 
built without regard to the integrity 
of a community can destroy the vital- 
ity and degrade the quality of that 
community. 

With increased leisure, broader edu- 
cation and greater mobility, we are 
more sensitive to the impact of en- 
vironmental contamination on our 
lives. 

We demand changes. We react to 
dirty air, foul odors, vile water, noise 
and ugliness with disgust. We demand 
changes. 

But as consumers of an ever-in- 
creasing supply of goods and services, 
we contribute to the activities which 
cause us misery. 

It seems, at times, that man expects 



10 



to use this good earth only for a short 
time; that, when all our resources are 
consumed, our water is useless, and 
our skies are black, we will pack up 
and resettle on another new frontier. 

I do not subscribe to this theory, 
nor do I support those who would 
make it fact. We must move now 
to renovate, rejuvenate and recapture 
our environment. 

We must maintain that which is 
not defiled, enhance that which is de- 
graded, and restore that which has 
been destroyed. While we may dream 
of the frontiers of space, we must act 
on the frontier of recovery. 

None of this can be done if the 
people of this nation leave the deci- 
sions and the efforts to government 
and industry alone. Government can 
only make the laws. 

It is people, consumers, who will 
determine the effectiveness of those 
laws — how they shall be administered. 

This is what participatory politics 
is all about: People at each level of 
government actively participating in 
the decisions made at those levels. 

We have laws on the books today 
to assure public participation in policy 
decisions which affect our environ- 
ment. 

The first stage of the water quality 
program has been a good example. 
During the period when states were 
required to set water quality stand- 

THE CARPENTER 



ards, they were also required to hold 
public hearings to ascertain what kind 
of water quality the public wanted. 

The same basic system — with some 
modifications — has been established 
for air quality standards. But, having 
environmental quality laws on the 
books is no guarantee of success. 

Those who have profited in the ab- 
sence of such statutes will always be 
better prepared, have more informa- 
tion, and spend more time protecting 
their interests. 

Individual citizens tend to join bat- 
tles on a crisis-to-crisis basis and fight 
unorganized battles. 

This is where public officials can 
and must perform a key role. State 
and local environmental control agen- 
cies can translate consumer concern 
into meaningful standards which meet 
the tests of economic and technical 
feasibility and enhance environmental 
quality. 

A creative people deserve a creative 
government. 

Unfortunately, government de- 
velops vested interests which become 
more concerned with self-perpetuation 
than with social values. Sometimes 
economic interests and government 
agency interests become so intertwined 
that the public cannot distinguish be- 
tween the two. When this continues 
for a long time, a clash between indi- 
vidual citizens and the combined 
forces of public agencies and private 
interests are almost inevitable. 

We have seen this develop, for ex- 
ample, in the growing dispute over 
the location of large nuclear power 
plants licensed by the Atomic Energy 
Commission. 

During the past five years, the Con- 
gress has been engaged in an accel- 
erating effort to overcome the prob- 
lems created by those who put short- 
term private gains ahead of long-term 
public needs. 

From recent news accounts, it is ap- 
parent that our work is not done. 

Laws Challenged 

Those who put the conservation of 
resources and the enhancement of en- 
vironmental quality far down the list 
of priorities are challenging existing 
laws and resisting our efforts to im- 
prove them. They are challenging 
and resisting even within the Depart- 
ment of Interior, whose principal re- 
sponsibility is that of conservation. 

We intend to overcome the chal- 
lenges and the resistance, but we can't 
do the job alone. 

We need the active support of con- 
sumers who care about a better en- 
vironment. We need their participa- 



tion in the educational and legislative 
job to be done. 

Unfortunately, too many people, 
for too long, have assumed that par- 
ticipating in a democracy begins or 
ends at the ballot box. City, state and 
federal governments have functioned 
in the abyss of public neglect. Those 
who can afford constant representa- 
tion in the halls of Congress, in legis- 
lative lobbies and in the city halls have 
dominated the decision-making pro- 
cedures — often because of their con- 
stant presence. 

The public — the consumer — has ab- 
dicated civic responsibility on a "let 
George do it" basis. The result has 
been devastating and will worsen. Too 
frequently that which is destroyed to- 
day cannot be recovered tomorrow. 

We as a society, as consumers, must 
develop an ability to become involved. 
In effect, we must move our criticism 
from the kitchen to the hearing room, 
from the living room to the legisla- 
ture, from the back fence to the ballot 
box, from in front of the tv set to in 
front of the tv camera. 

All too few of us take an active in- 
terest in many, many problems which 
immediately affect our lives. 

We depend on government to make 
fair and responsible decisions on 
these matters, yet we complain about 
the costs required to bring the neces- 
sary expertise to government. 

We depend on government to find 
solutions to problems which seem too 
complex for us as individuals, and yet 
we make no attempt to provide direc- 
tion or participate in the decisions. 

I recognize that meaningful public 
participation in environmental policy- 
making cannot occur in the absence 
of alternatives. 

Examples abound where projects 
designed to meet a public need are 
caught between adamant proponents 
and opponents, because no alterna- 
tives have been offered. 

One needs only to look at the fed- 
eral highway program to see the in- 
herent dangers which exist when peo- 
ple concerned about the environmental 
quality have no available alternatives. 

Government has an obligation to 
provide and the public has a right to 
demand built-in-safeguards in these 
programs to assure that this does not 
happen. These safeguards cannot be 
limited to public hearings and beauti- 
fication measures. The public is en- 
titled to and must demand alternative 
methods for meeting specific goals. 

One of the areas where we are most 
in need of alternative approaches to 



pollution control is that of handling 
solid wastes. 

We live in a disposable society. 
Appliances and machines have built- 
in obsolescence. No deposit, no re- 
turn bottles and cans are used as a 
convenience and cast out as a nui- 
sance. 

Here, the consumer finds himself in 
the position of the industrialist or the 
government agency head. He — or 
she — intent on the enjoyment of tech- 
nological advances and supported by 
the availability of the disposal and the 
trash collection, adds daily to the 
mountains of solid waste we dump, 
bury and burn. 

Return to Nature 

Some of these wastes gradually re- 
turn to nature, as is the case with 100 
million tons of wood wastes and 7 
million tons of newsprint per year. 
Some kinds of wastes, however, be- 
come permanent additions to the land- 
scape, as is the case with 150 million 
annual tons of steel mill slag and 30 
billion glass containers per year. 

The materials we waste need not be 
wasted. They contain resources which 
are limited and can be reused, if we 
are willing to find new and better ways 
to recover them. 

From the limited evidence we have 
gathered in our committee, it is evi- 
dent that recovery and re-use will have 
far lower costs than our present pro- 
gram of shifting the waste problem 
from private homes to public places. 

But consumers will have to educate 
themselves and work for better solu- 
tions if public officials and corporate 
executives are to respond. The power 
of voices, votes and pocketbooks will 
have to be combined. 

Man is affronted by his environment 
today because he has ignored his en- 
vironment in the past. 

We can never achieve the environ- 
ment of our past, but we must recog- 
nize, as lames Fenimore Cooper said 
in The Prairie. "The air. the water and 
the ground are free gifts to man and 
no one has the power to portion them 
out in parcels. Man must drink and 
breathe and walk and therefore each 
man has a right to his share of each." 

Insuring that each of us has an 
equitable share of these blessings be- 
comes more complex in a complicated 
world. But, as Cooper wrote, the 
water, the air and the land are in fixed 
supply. Each must yield to ever-in- 
creasing demands upon it. If we are 
not careful, God's future children will 
not have a fair share of any of 
them. ■ 



MARCH, 1969 



11 




Carpenter Apprentice Heads Michigan Parachutists Club 



EXHIBITIONS 



PACKING 




RESCUE 



DESCENDERS 



Sport parachuting Club 

for information call wilson & son flying service 

Fremont 924.0460 



The skydiver's "spread eagle" 
on the Descenders' calling 
card, above, is duplicated by 
Club Member Connie Du- 
Bois, an office secretary, 
after she exits from an air- 
craft 3,800 feet above Fre- 
mont, Michigan. 




■ Almost any Saturday and Sunday, 
weather permitting, members of "The 
Descenders", a parachute-jumping and 
sky-diving club, are descending all 
around Fremont Airport in lower 
Michigan. President and pilot of the 
club is an apprentice member of Lo- 
cal 100, Muskegon, Michigan. An- 
other apprentice member, James Pitre 
has been "actively jumping" with the 
club for more than a year and by 
January 22 had logged 53 jumps, in- 
cluding a number of "timed delay 
openings" and "free-fall jumps." Both 
men are fourth-year apprentices. 

The club might be called a union- 
label operation. On the roster are un- 
ion Ironworkers, Tool Makers, Team- 
sters, Railroad Employees, Office Em- 
ployees, and a School Teacher. A few 
ladies add to the excitement. The club 
is affiliated with the Parachute Clubs 
of America. 

Inclement weather prevented the 
Descenders from dropping in on the 
local Carpenters annual picnic, last 
year, but they have plans for another 
20 at it next summer. ■ 




Above: Jump Master Juan Garcia completes a stand-up landing 
beside M-37 Dragway. Ready to assist are Teamster Francis 
UuBois and Railroad Section Foreman Robert Knasb. 






Club President and Carpenter Apprentice 
McCastle beside his stripped-out aircraft, 
ready for a "jump run." 



Carpenter Apprentice Jim Pitre, seated on 
the ground at right, helps his son, center, 
and Ironworker Apprentice Randy Peevie 
put chute gear away. 





Some of the club members beside their jump plane. From left they include: Harold McCastle. Local 100 carpenter apprentice, 
president of the club and pilot: James Pitre, Local 100 carpenter apprentice; Randy Peevie, Ironworker apprentice. Grand 
Rapids local union; Francis DuBois. Teamster from Muskegon: Juan Garcia of the Misco Corp.. jump master and ground 
training instructor; Robert Knasb of Holton, C&O Railroad section foreman; and a club member identified only as Lee. 



MARCH, 1969 



13 




^ffiRSBBHBBa 





* 



Wage /Price Treadmill 



The Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor 
Statistics recently issued its annual report on earnings 
and prices. A glance at the increase in earnings 
enjoyed by U. S. workers in 1968 poses a very pretty 
picture . . . but a most inaccurate one. 

The fact is that our hard-fought wage gains have 
been virtually eroded away by the skyrocketing prices 
of nearly everything we buy or use. 

The gain in take-home pay averaged nearly 5 
percent last year. At the end of December, 1968, the 
take-home pay of the "average" U. S. worker with 
three dependents was $95.28 a week. This is $4.42 
more per week than the same worker would have 
brought home at the end of 1967. 

Such a wage gain might be considered adequate if 
prices had remained the same. Instead, the higher 
prices and its inflationary effect wiped out all but 48 
cents of the worker's pay increase. 

Everything — food, housing, clothing or whatever 
— was being sold with bigger price tags. 

The Consumer Price Index in December, 1968 
was 123.7, as compared to an index figure of 100 set 
as the 1957-59 average. This means that it cost the 
average city family $12.37 to buy goods and services 
that would have cost $10.00 in the 1957-59 base 
period. 

The increase in the price index during 1968 was 
the highest in 17 years. Grocery prices last year 
averaged 4.2 percent above the 1967 level . . . and if 
you tried to avoid this increase by suggesting that 
the family eat out more often, you quickly learned 
that the prices of restaurant meals were up 5.7 per- 
cent. The ladies of the house may have grumbled, too, 
about the higher price of those short skirts; overall, 
clothing costs were up 6.7 percent last year. It was 
difficult to move away from the higher prices — hous- 
ing costs were up substantially higher than 1967 
figures. 

And, if you borrowed money to pay higher bills 
from creditors, you were told that interest rates were 
up, too. 

If the whole wage/price treadmill leaves you sick, 
think again before going to your doctor — the cost 
of medical care service, hospital and doctors' fees 



EDITORIALS 



led the inflationary trend with a substantial 7.3 per- 
cent increase over the previous year. 

The inflationary race for 1969 has begun. Can the 
American worker come out ahead — even by 48 cents 
— by the end of this year? 



& 



New Wage Law Dodge 



"You don't have to go to Hong Kong, Taiwan, 
South Korea or Japan for low-cost easily trainable 
foreign labor," proclaims DATE — Development Au- 
thority for Tucson's Expansion. "It's available right 
here . . . along the Mexico-Arizona border for as low 
as 30 cents an hour in virtually inexhaustible numbers. 
Mexican labor is competitive with foreign labor — eas- 
ily recruited, quickly trained and equally as produc- 
tive." 

This cheap appeal to American businessmen by 
DATE and several other Chamber of Commerce type 
groups near the Mexican border is getting nationwide 
response. The approach used is an open attempt to 
evade U. S. minimum wage laws and circumvent gov- 
ernment limitations on "green carders" and to follow 
other near-illegal labor practices using Mexican na- 
tionals. 

These groups, which seem to sanction any form of 
promotion which will bring new business to their 
area, have hit on the "twin-plant" concept. 

This is the way the plan works — or is supposed to 
work: Components are made in a small plant on the 
U. S. side of the border, then shipped to a large 
Mexican-based plant employing extremely low-paid 
workmen. After assembly, the product is returned 
to the U. S. for final inspection. Duty is imposed only 
on the added value of the assembly. 

In a recent case one American company which had 
set up "twin-plants" found that the Mexican nationals 
were not nearly so ready to work for next-to-nothing 
as the promoters had eagerly proclaimed. The elec- 
tronics firm was promptly faced with a walkout over 
wages, forcing it to complete production at consider- 
ably higher cost from other American-based sub- 
sidiaries. 

Promotion of these schemes, which sidestep Ameri- 
can wage laws and exploit the poor Mexican workers, 
continues in spite of such fiascos. 

The threat of imports to U. S. labor is no longer 
across the sea, it's in our own back yard. 



14 



THE CARPENTER 



THE CARPENTER'S 
CUPBOARD 



by SHIRLEY STOWELL 






1.2.^ 



&* 



«?. 



^itZ^Z 



'**: 



^■z.* 




■ You've heard of the "shoe- 
maker's shoes," the "electrician's 
wiring," and the "plumber's plumb- 
ing?" Well, I am the unfortunate 
victim of "carpenter's cupboard" — 
an occupational disease which strikes 
only the wives of carpenters. 

Being in the category of "carpen- 
ter's wife," the disease began on me 
20 years ago with a mild case of 
the "blahs." It grew and grew in 
intensity through the stages of "mild, 
chronic, and acute" — until I now 
find myself with an extremely acute 
case. As in "shoemaker's shoe," 
etc., the only known cure for "car- 
penter's cupboard" is many, many, 
doses of energy and enthusiasm on 
the part of one's spouse. Demands 
for home carpentry work fall on deaf 
ears. Bribery may as well be for- 
gotten. Tears work in the beginning 
when the case is only mild, but 
become less and less effective as the 
disease progresses. 

Mistake Number One for a car- 
penter's wife is to agree that building 
one's own house would be a good 
idea. Except in rare instances, this 
leads to the onset of "the blahs." 
After the first two years have passed 
and the closet doors are not on yet, 
the "mild stage" sets in. At this 
point, demands are helpful, but they 
soon lead to name-callinc such as: 



"neighborhood nag" or "Heartless 
Hanna." If you drop your defenses 
at this point, you will go on for 
three more years washing your sup- 
per dishes in the basement stationary 
tubs. 

By then, the "chronic stage" of 
your illness has set in. It's at the 
chronic stage that many women be- 
gin to take up carpentry themselves. 
I had become pretty proficient with 
a hammer by this time. I could also 
miter a corner, sling a mean paint 
brush, and install shingles on a 
leaky roof. I learned too late that 
this is Mistake Number Two, be- 
cause now there is no reason for 
enthusiasm on the part of your 
spouse. The job seems to be getting 
done by itself. . . . 

Warm, pleasant days bring on 
cases of boat fever. Cool, crisp days 
are inclined to promote call-of-the- 
wild hunting instincts within your 
carpenter husband. Hot days are too 
hot and cold days too cold for the 
job at hand. 

In about the fifteenth year, when 
none of the closets have shelves yet, 
and the parts of the house that were 
done show signs of needing re- 
modeling, the "acute stage" takes its 
ugly hold upon you. 

The acute stage of "carpenter's 
cupboard" is extremely painful, and 



the following symptoms are com- 
mon: growing discontent, an en- 
largment of the upper right arm 
muscle, and a sudden unquenchable 
interest in real estate. 

Your carpenter-husband will not 
like this idea at first, feeling a cer- 
tain pride in his own creation, but 
hang in there. He can eventually be 
brain-washed into examining other 
property. 

Being in the building trades and 
well-schooled in basic construction, 
the carpenter will look for such 
things as floor sag. copper plumbing, 
adequate floor joists, and a dozen 
and one other basic agents. You, 
meanwhile, will be in the market 
for built-in bookcases, attractive 
wallpaper, and those cute little ex- 
tras. It's hard to find such a perfect 
house, and Mistake Number Three 
would be to buy a house that needs 
re-modeling!! 

When "carpenter's cupboard" ad- 
vances to the stage that all I'm 
demanding is a blindfold and a 
cigarette, when I come back in the 
next life, I'll make certain thai 1 
marry a "shoemaker." ■ 



EDITOR'S NOTE: The author of this 
"exaggerated satire . . . drawn from per- 
sonal experience" is the wife of Richard 
Stowell, Local lf>2'K Ashtabula, Ohio. 



MARCH. 1969 



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Work Law Lobby Seeks 
To Exploit Poorer Workers 



The National Right-to-Work Com- 
mittee apparently intends to exploit the 
nation's poorer workers — Negroes, farm 
workers and public employees — in its ef- 
fort to destroy the union shop. 

The committee, which is supported by 
money from anti-union employers, pa- 
raded spokesmen for its latest strategy at 
a press conference in Washington. 

Notably absent from the conference's 
declarations was any boast of putting 
over new state right-to-work laws. The 
committee has been completely unsuc- 
cessful in this area in recent years. 

Appearing for committee were: 

• Ben Howard of Los Angeles, a 
former UAW member, who spoke out 
for black separatism and dual unionism 
as a leader of a California group called 
Black Workers Alliance. 

• Jose Mendoza, self-styled farm 
worker, who has been touring the country 
with financial help from the committee in 
an effort to undermine the grape work- 
ers' strike in California. 

• James Nixon, a Negro, who has 
brought suit in an attempt to knock out 
an agency shop contract negotiated be- 
tween the city of Detroit and State, Coun- 
ty & Municipal Employes Council 77. 

Howard said that his alliance hopes 
to "raid" established unions in Cali- 
fornia to form "separate" black unions. 
Under questioning, he conceded this 
was "dual unionism" and that he might 
run into trouble securing elections under 
the Taft-Hartley Law. 

He claimed that "there have been 
moves" within the National Association 
for the Advancement of Colored People 
and the Southern Christian Leadership 
Conference "to combat" the union shop. 
He couldn't specifically identify any. 

When a reporter reminded him that 
the late Dr. Martin Luther King, who 
formerly headed SCLC, was a strong 
supporter of the union shop, Howard 
nodded assent. 

Asked why he was no longer a mem- 
ber of UAW Local 887 at North Ameri- 
can-Rockwell, an aircraft manufacturer, 
he said he was promoted out of the bar- 
gaining unit into a supervisory post at 
the plant. 

Mendoza told how the committee "has 
sponsored me on tours" through the 
United States in opposition to the AFL- 
CIO United Farm Workers Organizing 
Committee's boycott of grape growers 
who refuse to recognize or bargain with 
the union or to permit an election among 
the grape pickers. 

He identified himself as general secre- 
tary of Farm Workers — Freedom to 
Work, which he said was formed "after 
a series of workers' rallies last fall" to 
oppose UFWOC. 

A spokesman for UFWOC in Delano, 
Calif., said the organization was formed 
with financial backing from Giumarra 



16 



Vineyards of Bakersfield and several 
other grape growers. 

Jerry Cohen, UFWOC attorney, said 
the union now has a suit pending in a 
state court against Mendoza's organiza- 
tion, originally known as "Farm Work- 
ers — Freedom to Work Association," 
charging that it illegally took money 
from an employer. "It's a company 
union, no doubt about it," Cohen said. 

Mendoza attacked legislation in Con- 
gress, backed by UFWOC, which would 
give farm workers the right to join unions 
and bargain collectively like other work- 
ers. 

He said he opposed the bill because it 
would permit the union shop and hiring 
hall. But a "work" committee spokes- 
man said the committee itself would 
neither oppose nor support the measure. 

Nixon was praised by the committee 
for leading a fight to "nullify" a contract 
forcing workers "to join and pay dues" 
to a union. Actually, an agency shop 
contract, such as the one in question, does 
not require workers to join a union. But 
those who do not are required to pay the 
equivalent of dues as a service fee, since 
federal law requires a union to represent 
and bargain for all workers in its juris- 
dictional unit whether they are members 
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THE CARPENTER 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



Six Apprentices Honored at 75th Anniversary Banquet 




A recent dinner-dance sponsored by Local 253 and held at Nasr's Restaurant, Omaha, 
Nebraska, was the setting for the presentation of apprentice diplomas to graduates 
who have completed four years of training. Apprentices pictured, left to right: 
Paul Anderson, Joseph Kuber, Darvin Brannon and John Halford. Not pictured are 
John M. Cowdery and Leo Loeffler. Leon VV. Greene, Fifth District Board Member 
and George Chadwell, president of Local 253 and general representative of the 
Brotherhood, presented the awards. 

LEFT 

Portland Graduate 

Richard Huennekens, a new journey- 
man of Local 226, was recently presented 
with his journeyman certificate by Ken- 
neth Davis, West Coast Coordinator for 
the Brotherhood. 

BELOW 

Bardonia Honoree 

Twelve apprentices recently graduated 
from the apprentice training school of 
Local 964, Bardonia, N. Y. One of the 
12 is congratulated below. From left are: 
General Secretary Richard E. Livingston, 
First General Vice President Finlay C. 
Allan, extending heart} congratulations 
to Robert Morina, graduating apprentice, 
and Patrick J. Campbell, assistant to the 
General President. 







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!*| Canadian Report 



Housing Report Is 
Widely Criticized 

The federal Task Force on Housing 
headed by Transport Minister Paul 
Hellyer made its report to the House 
of Commons early in February. The 
report got a poor reception especially 
from the Canadian Welfare Council 
and the trade union movement. 

The CWC said that the report of- 
fered nothing for the housing needs 
of more than a million Canadian fam- 
ilies with incomes below $5,500 a 
year. 

The Task Force aims to help people 
in the middle and upper income 
groups. The top priority, according to 
CWC, is to help the low to middle 
income groups. 

"The Task Force," said Michael 
Wheeler, executive secretary of the 
Council, "is plainly baffled by the 
problem of those whose housing needs 
cannot be met through the private 
market and instead of grappling with 
the problem, has taken refuge in at- 
tacking the popular whipping boy of 
public housing." 

Organized labor in Canada agrees 
with this criticism. 

No one on the Task Force repre- 
sented the consumer, welfare or trade 
union position. It is not surprising that 
what was produced was basically a 
backward-looking, rather than a for- 
ward-looking document. 

John Gilbert, a New Democratic 
member of parliament who is the 
party's housing critic, called the report 
an outright fraud. He called for the 
building of at least 250,000 homes 
each year for the next few years, 
compared with less than 200,000 built 
in 1968, with the emphasis on help 
for lower income families, and for 
massive land acquisition by the prov- 
inces and municipalities in order to 
bring down land costs. 

OFL Launches Public 
Relations Campaign 

The Ontario Federation of Labor 
has launched its public relations cam- 
paign to give the people some of the 
facts of trade union existence. The 
public is obviously being influenced by 
the kind of propaganda fed to it by 
the mass media, some of it's simply a 
matter of the kind of emphasis the 
media give to strikes. 



The PR campaign will point out, 
among other things, that 95% of col- 
lective bargaining agreements are 
reached without resort to strikes. 
Only 5% are resolved — or not re- 
solved — after strike action, and many 
in this 5% are small strikes of short 
duration and really inconsequential ex- 
cept to the workers involved. 

The OFL has produced figures on 
time lost through strikes in Ontario 
and in Canada. Published in the cur- 
rent issue of Labour Review, the fig- 
ures show that, for the last five years, 
1964-8 inclusive, an average of 20 
days has been lost through strikes 
across Canada for every 10,000 days 
worked. This amounts to about five 
hours in every working year of about 
250 days. 

In Ontario time lost through strikes 
has averaged about 27 days in every 
10,000 days worked. Over a period 
of nine years in Ontario, time lost 
through strikes has averaged only 19 
days lost for every 10,000 days worked 
— or about half a day in a working 
year. 

This is a good record, especially 
when compared with time lost through 
unemployment or injuries. Ten times 
more time is lost through unemploy- 
ment and on-the-job injuries than 
through strikes. 

The OFL is trying to raise $125,000 
to pay for the PR campaign which 
will be largely centered on TV spots 
with some newspaper advertising in 
local areas. It is planned to air 63 TV 
spots in nine weeks over major sta- 
tions in Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Windsor, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie 
and Port Arthur-Fort William. 

Unions Welcome 
CWC Welfare Report 

In addition to its strong statement 
on housing, the Canadian Welfare 
Council, on which the trade union 
movement is represented, made public 
the results of a major study on "Social 
Policies for Canada." 

There is a move from business and 
other interests including people in 
Parliament to lay the blame for the 
increasing cost of living on govern- 
ment expenditures, particularly those 
on welfare benefits. 

The Canadian Welfare Council 
makes the point that you cannot suc- 



cessfully combat the poverty in Can- 
ada without increasing social welfare 
measures. 

To underpin an increased social 
welfare program, the CWC recom- 
mends a guaranteed minimum income 
program which would provide every 
Canadian family with enough money 
to keep above the poverty level. In 
addition, it proposes increased spend- 
ing on old age pensions, family allow- 
ances, youth allowances, a sickness 
benefits insurance plan, better unem- 
ployment and workmen's compensa- 
tion payments and the protection of 
the income of a working mother dur- 
ing pregnancy and childbirth. 

This was a very welcome report 
from the point of view of the trade 
union movement who have advocated 
most of the measures in the CWC pro- 
posals. 

Postal Rates Up 
On Publications 

New postal rates are pricing many 
trade union publications out of exist- 
ence, according to William Dodge, 
Executive Vice-President, Canadian 
Labor Congress. 

Effective April 1st, the new rates 
will boost the mailing costs for one 
union publication from about a 
thousand dollars a year to $30,000, 
another from $9,000 a year to almost 
$100,000. 

Postmaster General Kierans has 
shown no signs of relenting. 

Ontario Groups Offer 
Joint Safety Brief 

Trade unions including the OFL 
and the Ontario Building Trades Coun- 
cil joined with the Canadian Con- 
struction Association in presenting a 
brief to the Ontario government on 
improvements in safety on the job. 

One of the points agreed upon was 
that workers should have the right to 
refuse to work under unsafe condi- 
tions. Enforcement of the existing leg- 
islation is weak, said the brief, and 
the best rules in the world are useless 
without competent safety inspectors 
able to act efficiently and quickly. 

The joint brief also called for pro- 
vincial, instead of municipal, appoint- 
ment and control of safety inspectors 
under the Construction Safety Act and 
the Trench Excavators Protection 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Act; power for the inspectors to go 
to court for a court order, immedi- 
ately upon non-compliance with a 
stop-work order; improved salaries for 
inspectors and their selection on a 
basis of formal training, experience 
and education; a requirement that each 
constructor call together his staff to 
point out potential hazards and to 
hold regular on-the-job safety meet- 
ings. 

This is the first time that a unani- 
mous joint submission was made. 

Rising Health 

Costs Pose Dilemma 

Some of the infighting between pri- 
vate and public medicare plans comes 
to light now and then. In Ontario it 
looks as though the infighting should 
be completely exposed to the light of 
day. But all the evidence is not yet in. 

The Physicians' Services Inc. of 
Ontario has just boosted its rates by 
almost 50% . This is the largest pri- 
vate medicare agency in the province, 
controlled in part at least by the 
medical profession themselves. 

The doctors boosted their fees again 
recently. The new PSI rates reflect 
this boost, but how does anyone know 
that a 50% increase is really needed? 

The Ontario Federation of Labor 
has urged the government to make 
PSI and similar so-called non-profit 
agencies bargain for their increases in 
much the same way trade unions do — 
"openly announcing, justifying and 
bargaining for increases as well as 
going through predetermined waiting 
periods while the public can assess the 
justice or otherwise of their demands." 

The cost of health services in Can- 
ada has gone up higher than any other 
item in the consumer price index — 
about 100% since 1949. Prepaid health 
services have gone up even more — 
about 150%. 

The new boost in PSI rates will give 
the provincial government in Ontario 
an excuse to boost its rates for the 
OMSIP plan — the government plan of 
medicare which provides reduced rates 
for low income groups. 

The trade unions fear that PSI is in 
effect running interference for the gov- 
ernment and the doctors. If the On- 
tario government accepts the federal 
medicare program and takes the 
money — at least $150 million a year — 
it might use this medicare money for 
other purposes as British Columbia 
is doing, instead of reducing its OMSIP 
rates to the public. 

That's why some union leaders are 
planning to bring this plot, if plot it is, 
into the open. 



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LABOR NEWS BRIEFS 



AFL-CIO Seeks to Find Workers 
Owed $400,000 in Back Wages 

There are almost 4,000 workers scattered throughout 
the United States who are entitled to some $400,000 in 
back pay and the AFL-CIO is trying to find them. 

President George Meany has written the Federation's 
state central bodies asking them to help locate the 3,802 
workers to whom the money is due. 

The wages, in some cases amounting to $500, were re- 
covered by the U.S. Labor Department after investiga- 
tions of employer violations of the Fair Labor Standards 
Act. Meany enclosed a list of names and last known 
addresses of the workers whose present whereabouts are 
unknown. 

He also said that workers located by local bodies 
should write to the Administrator, Wage and Hour and 
Public Contracts Division, U.S. Department of Labor, 
Washington, D.C. including their names, addresses, recent 
employers and social security numbers. (PAI) 

800,000 Elderly Have Only Until 
April 1 to Enter Medical Program 

The Federal government is notifying some 800,000 
elderly men and women that they have only until April 1 
to sign up for the voluntary doctor bill insurance program 
under Medicare. 

The Department of Health, Education and Welfare 
points out that for many of those who missed out on pre- 
vious chances to sign up, the period from now until the 
end of March will be the last chance to get this protec- 
tion. This includes those who were born October 1, 1901 
or earlier and those who were enrolled in the program 
but dropped out January 1, 1967 or before. 

Almost 19.000.000 elderly, 65 years or older, are now 
signed up for the program which costs $4 a month. It 
entitles those insured to payment of doctors bills and 
other health services not covered by Medicare which is 
limited to hospital services. (PAI) 

Union-Industries Show 
Set for New Denver Hall 

The 1969 Union-Industries Show, the annual exhibi- 
tion of union-made products and services, will open in 
Denver, Colorado, May 16 for a six-day stay in that city's 
new exhibition hall. 

The hall, now under construction, will be dedicated by 
city officials during the show at the multi-million dollar 
Denver Convention Center. 

More exhibits than ever and the largest attendance ever 
are expected by show director Joseph Lewis on the basis 
of exhibitor reservations to date, and past performance in 
a series stretching back to 1938. Lewis is secretary-treas- 
urer of the AFL-CIO Union Label & Service Trades Dept. 

Show preparations enter their final stage with the ar- 
rival here this month of department staff members in 
charge of show arrangements. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




Send In Your Favorites! Mail To: Plane Gossip, 101 Constitution 
Avenue. N.W.. Washington, D. C. 20001. SORRY, NO PAYMENT. 




Safe At Home! 

The bus driver was charged with 
illegally admitting 150 people to his 
bus. His lawyer moved that the 
charge be set aside because it was 
physically impossible to get that many 
people aboard. To solve the case, the 
judge ordered the bus brought around 
and the police herded 150 Jail pris- 
oners toward it. The judge soon saw 
they could not all get aboard and 
quashed the indictment. Later the 
driver admitted to his lawyer that 
he had, indeed, had 150 people 
aboard. "But you couldn't!" replied 
his attorney. "You saw, yourself, that 
the judge couldn't get 150 aboard!" 
"True," replied the driver. "But his 
weren't trying to get home and mine 



stands up, 
him!" 



advised the vet, "sell 



were! 



— H. E. Millham, Fullerton, Pa. 



FOR BETTER LAW'S, GIVE TO CLIC 




She Was 86'd! 

"I don't think I'd better sell you any 
more, lady. Looks like you've had too 
much already!" 

I' R II IE "U" in i MONISM 

Just Horsin' Around 

The vet had been called in to ex- 
amine a horse. "He's not sick, he's 
just lazy," he declared. "But what 
will I do with him?" asked the owner 
looking down at the horse, stretched 
out on the hay. "The next time he 



ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Mr. Pert Sez: 

"Miniskirts are great, for young 
gals and old guys. But whyizzit that 
the bigger 'n uglier a gal's thighs are, 
the higher she hikes her hem?" 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Employer Was Curbed! 

The latest victory for organized la- 
bor was chalked up recently when the 
NLRB ordered a street cleaner re- 
instated in his job. Seems he was fired 
because he couldn't keep his mind in 
the gutter. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

A Real III Wind! 

The Internal Revenue Agent was 
explaining casualty loss conditions to 
a taxpayer, carefully defining "fafr 
market value" before and after a loss. 
"So now," he said, "just what was the 
fair market value of your home im- 
mediately before the casualty?" 
"Nothing!" retorted the taxpayer. 
"Who'd buy a house right in the path 
of a tornado?" 

IN UNION I Ml l;l IS S M.'i NGTH 

Popular Pastime 

The sergeant was watching the 
draftee pack to go home, his military 
service completed. "I'll bet you can't 
wait to spit on my grave!" snarled 



This Month's Limerick 

A starving old farmer named Wicken 
Decided to cook his last chicken 
But the fowl said, "No use, sir, 
You see, I'm a rooster, 
And there's honor and glory among 

men!" 
— Kathryn McGaughey, Denver, Colo. 



his sergeant. "That's not so at all, 
sergeant," protested the new civilian. 
"Once I am out of this army, I never 
want to stand in another line again!" 

LIKE TOOLS. BE SHARP d. SALE 

Give 'Em A Chance.' 

His secretary was talking to our 
business agent. "Tell me," she said, 
"do you believe in clubs for women?" 

"Certainly I do," the BA replied. 




Another Phoney Story! 

"Oh, dear!" exclaimed the doctor's 
wife as he turned away from the 
phone. "Must you make a call to- 
night?" "I'm afraid so," he replied, 
"and don't wait up . . . it's a serious 
case. There are three doctors there 
already!" 

I! U A UNION BOOS II R ' 

Woodn't You Know? 

A hillbilly inherited a tract of 
timber which he wanted to market. 
A hardware store salesman talked 
him into buying a chain saw, promis- 
ing that with it he could fell several 
dozen trees daily. After two weeks, 
the hillbilly returned the saw, com- 
plaining that, try as he might, he 
couldn't get the saw to cut down 
more than six trees a day. The sales- 
man said: "Let's see what the trouble 
is," and with that he jerked the starter 
lanyard. The hillbilly jumped back and 
yelled: "What's that noise!?" 

—Louis Delin, L.U. 608, 
New York City. 



MARCH, 1969 



21 



JOB CORPS CENTER 

Continued from Page 9 

Finlay C. Allan, First General Vice 
President of the United Brother- 
hood. Programs are underway at 
the Timber Lake Job Corps Civilian 
Conservation Center in Oregon, the 
Five Mile Center in California, the 
Anthony Center in West Virginia, 
Golconda in Illinois, New Waverly 
in Texas, and Flatwoods in Virginia. 
Future programs are planned for 
Poplar Bluff in Missouri, Mountain- 
air in New Mexico, and Schenck 
in North Carolina. All are operated 
for the Job Corps by the Forest 
Service, U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture. 

Each training program, like the 
new Koko Head program, accom- 
modates 60 trainees at all times and 
runs for 52 weeks, although Corps- 
men may leave the program for 
employment as soon as they satisfy 
Job Corps and industry require- 
ments. 

Job Corps graduates of the Car- 



penters' training program are work- 
ing from Oregon to Texas, from 
Michigan to California, earning an 
average of more than $3 an hour. 

Mrs. Mink said this is the second 
major partnership between the state- 
operated Koko Head Job Corps 
Civilian Conservation Center and 
an international union. The first 
union training program at Koko 
Head was established in June, 1968, 
by the Marine Cooks and Stewards 
Union. To date, 1 1 Koko Head 
Corpsmen have been placed as ships' 
cooks, stewards and messman at a 
minimum wage of $480 per month. 

The Job Corps is the voluntary 
residential training program of the 
Office of Economic Opportunity to 
give out-of-school, out-of-work, un- 
derprivileged young men and women 
the opportunity to develop voca- 
tional, social and educational skills 
and become productive and useful 
citizens. The Koko Head Center 
is designed to train 250 Corpsmen 
from Hawaii and the Trust Terri- 
tories. ■ 



BATH MUSEUM 

Continued from Page 7 

wrested from gales around the Cape of 
Good Hope took material form in clas- 
sical residential architecture. 

There are over 3,000 individual arti- 
facts on display, among them are tools 
that were used by Bath shipbuilders on 
wooden ships. Shown in the photograph 
on Page 7, they are typical of those that 
worked the big timbers anywhere in the 
new world. 

Especially attractive for families visit- 
ing the Bath area in the "please touch" 
room in the Bath Marine Museum, built 
for children. They can stand behind an 
immense, polished wooden ships' wheel 
and spin an imaginary rudder to clear the 
rocks of the Horn, while yanking enthu- 
siastically on the rope attached to a ship's 
bell overhead. 

The Bath shipyards produced many 
kinds of vessels. In addition to the giants 
of the open oceans, they fashioned coastal 
fishing and pleasure boats. They made 
the river steamers that moved goods, 
people and mail from the coast to the 
head of navigable waters. 

All of them, and the tools that shaped 
them and outfitted them, are in the Mu- 
seum. Photos cover the walls, models fill 
glass cases, and the overall impression 
sidesteps the mustiness you might expect. 
If you listen intently, you sometimes can 
almost hear the creak of rope over the 
clanging of the bell in the "please touch" 
room. 




These well-paid positions need you now! 



The best-paying jobs in building are being 
filled by former carpenters and apprentices. 

The "population explosion" is in full bloom. Men 
like yourself are being counted on to supervise 
the construction work on millions of new houses, 
apartments, factories, office buildings and insti- 
tutions. The question is: Do you have the all- 
around construction know-how needed to step up 
to these better paying positions? ... If not, 
Chicago Tech can show you how to prepare to 
take advantage of these job opportunities. 

All facts sent FREE . . . 

it won't cost you a penny 

With your permission, Chicago Tech will send 
you the latest book on Builder's Training and 



Opportunities — Plus a Free Trial Lesson with 
complete set of Blueprints. 

Chicago Tech Builder's Training is practical, 
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at home in your spare time. The Free Trial Les- 
son will show you how easy it is to learn the 
Chicago Tech way. No special schooling is re- 
quired and it will not interfere with your present 
work. You learn while you earn merely by devot- 
ing a few hours each week to study. 

As a building tradesman you are in a choice 
spot to cash in on this tremendous growth of the 
building industry. Your reward can be higher 
pay, more secure employment, plus the added 
prestige of a top job in building. So act now — get 
the facts — mail the coupon today! 

Builder's Training— by builders for builders 



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ESTABLISHED 1904 TECH BLDG., 2000 SOUTH MICHIGAN AVE., CHICAGO, ILL. GOG1E 

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C-141 Tech Bldg., 
2000 S. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 60616 

Please mail me Free Trial Lesson, Blueprints and Catalog - - 



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22 



THE CARPENTER 



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Retirement Guide 
To Happy Living 

Most people are concerned about their 
retirement, but too few are actively pre- 
paring for it. It is of major importance 
to know when, how, and where to derive 
maximum pleasure from the "harvest 
years" — years which can be happy and 
rewarding or sad and desolate, depending 
upon how well one has prepared for 
them. 

Much information is available on the 
different aspects of retirement, but it is 
piecemeal and scattered. Fortunately. 
The New Guide To Happy Retirement 
by George W. Ware presents the total 
picture of retirement planning, adjusting 
and living in a lucid, lively, down-to- 
earth guide which is pleasant to read and 
easy to understand. 

A few comments: 

Clark Tibbitts. national authority on 
aging and retirement, wrote in introduc- 
ing this book. "This book is needed. It 
contains an abundance of ideas which 
will make your life before and after 
retirement more pleasant, your problems 
more manageable, your situation less 
difficult. George Ware is a man of un- 
usually wide interests and experience and 
a recent retiree himself. He spent three 
years systematically gathering materials, 
making surveys, consulting experts and 
retirees and traveling throughout the 
country in preparing this, his fifth book, 
which counsels you how to prepare for 
and maximize the retirement period of 
life and postpone the onset of old age." 

Clarence M. Tarr. Past President of 
the National Association of Retired Civil 
Employees said. "I know of no better 
source of practical advice on preparing 
for and living in retirement than The 
New Guide To Happy Retirement." 

This 352-page, illustrated book con- 
tains helpful information on retirement 
planning and adjusting, health mainte- 
nance, financial management, supplemen- 
tal income, legal matters, family relation- 
ships, leisure time activities, social secu- 
rity and medicare, special services and 
facilities for older people, desirable living 
quarters, favorable places to live and 
many other problems which confront you 
sooner or later — before and after you 
retire. 

Carpenters, who usually work as long 
as they can and have a hard time quit- 
ting, will find this book particularly re- 
warding in developing breaks and shock 
absorbers for the day they hang up their 
tools to join the legion of retirees. Local 
unions would be well advised to make 
this book available to its members who 
are approaching retirement age. 

THE NEW GUIDE TO HAPPY RE- 
TIREMENT i.\ published by and avail- 
able front Crown Publishers, Incorpo- 
rated, 419 Park Avenue South. New 
York. N. Y. 10016. Single copies are 
$6.50 delivered. On orders of five (?) or 
more to VBCJA locals or one address, the 
priee is $3.90 f.o.b. New York. 



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used by thousands of carpenters. Shows you— 

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Stairs, Hoists, Scaffolds. HOW TO: File & Set Saws. Do 
Carpenters Arithmetic, Solve Mensuration Problems. Esti- 
mate Strength ol Timbers. Set Girders & Sills, Frame Houses 
& Roofs. Estimate Costs, Read & Draw Plans, Draw Up 
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MARCH, 1969 



23 




/ 



/ 
/ 






LOCAL UNION NEWS 



Retirement Dinner in New Jersey Council Secretary 




Vineland, N. J., was the setting for the retirement dinner of one of the senior business 
representatives of Local 121. On October 26, 1968, Business Representative Gunnar 
Backlund was honored at Molia Farms in Malaga, N. J., after serving as business 
agent for 26 years. Friends and members of the South Jersey District Council were 
available to express their best wishes for continued success, and to present a gold 
watch to Brother Backlund. Pictured, left to right: Robert E. Camp, business repre- 
sentative, South Jersey District Council (Atlantic City); Thomas C. Ober, business 
representative, South Jersey District Council (Camden); Gunnar Backlund, retiring 
business representative, South Jersey District Council (Vineland); Deno Venturi, 
newly-elected business representative replacing Brother Backlund; Faustino Wulderk, 
president, Local 121; Thomas McGrath, president, South Jersey District Council; and 
guest, Reverend Bauman, pastor of the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer. 




Charles M. Trenta, left, of Local 1453, 
Huntington Beach, Calif., president of the 
Orange County Building Trades Council, 
was sworn in recently as secretary of the 
Orange County District Council of Car- 
penters. Giving the obligation was Clint 
Nelson, a member of Local 2203, Ana- 
heim, Calif. Brother Nelson was the 
first president of the Council when it was 
chartered in April, 1938. Brother Nelson 
is 85 years of age and has held continu- 
ous membership since April, 1904. As 
of December, 1968 he has been a mem- 
ber for 64!<2 years. 



Calgary BR Attends Labor College Lia Honored 



Pat Mattei, a business representative 
for the Calgary District Council, Alberta, 
was selected by the Canadian Labor 
Congress and the 
Calgary District 
Council to attend 
an 8-week seminar 
program at the La- 
bor College of 
Canada in Mont- 
real, Quebec. 

Brother Mattei 
was a delegate to 
the last General 
Convention, and is 
one of the few 
building trades rep- 
resentatives who 
has been selected to attend one of 
these colleges. He is a relatively young 
man, past president and currently vice 
president of Local 1779, Calgary, who 
takes a sincere interest in all activities 
related to the Brotherhood. 

Mattei praised the work of the Labor 
College of Canada. He called his experi- 
ence as a student "unique and education- 




Mattei 



al." He urged the Building Trades to 
take a more active interest in the college, 
pointing out that there was only one 
other such craftsman in the 1968 class 
besides himself. 

A total of 590 trade unionists have 
participated in the college's training pro- 
gram since it began in 1963. Each term 
lasts for eight weeks, and training is in 
Montreal under the sponsorship of the 
Canadian Labor Congress, the University 
of Montreal, and McGill University. 

The curriculum consists of five courses, 
Mattei reports. These include: econo- 
mics, sociology, political science, history, 
and trade unionism. The first four 
courses are under the direction of uni- 
versity professors, while the latter is 
taught by industry and labor leaders. 

Financial support comes from the 
labor movement, from the Federal and 
provincial governments, and from indus- 
try (in the form of scholarships). In addi- 
tion, local unions and councils sending 
students to the college are expected to 
assist the sponsored student with personal 
expenses. 




A testimonial dinner-dance was held 
in Beacon, N.Y., honoring Joseph Lia, 
Local 323, for the outstanding job he 
has performed on behalf of the Carpen- 
ters of New York State. Patrick J. 
Campbell, assistant to General President 
M. A. Hutcheson, presented a gift and 
plaque to the retiree. Mrs. Lia was the 
pleased recipient of a gift from the mem- 
bers. Dominic A. Papo, president of 
Local 323, spoke of Brother Lia's many 
accomplishments and devoted service 
over the years. Pictured, left to right: 
Dominic A. Papo, Brother Lia, and Pat- 
rick J. Campbell. 

Members, wives and friends from 
many unions of New York State also 
attended the affair. 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



cue 



CONTRIBUTIONS, 1968 CAMPAIGN 



L.U. No. City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No 


1 /UU, III! U f CW1 4 

City & State 


Amount 


L.U. No 


City & State 


Amount 




ALASKA 






GEORGIA 






LOUISIANA 




2520 


Anchorage, Alaska 


$100.00 


1263 


Atlanta, Ga. 


20.00 


1846 
1931 


New Orleans. La. 
New Orleans, La. 


80.25 
4.00 




ARIZONA 






HAWAII 




2547 


Many, La. 


5.00 


1100 
1914 


Flagstaff. Ariz. 
Phoenix, Ariz. 


38.00 
22.00 


1011 


Honolulu. Hawaii 
IDAHO 


5.00 


101 


MARYLAND 

Baltimore, Md. 


6.00 




CALIFORNIA 








340 


Hagerstown, Md. 


30.00 


25 


Los Angeles. Calif. 


20.00 


635 


Boise, Idaho 


4.00 


1024 


Cumberland, Md. 


13.00 


235 


Riverside. Calif. 


5.00 


1258 


Pocatello, Idaho 


2.00 


1126 


Annapolis. Md. 


40.00 


354 
586 


Gilroy, Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. 


117.00 
194.00 




ILLINOIS 






MASSACHUSETTS 




642 


Richmond, Calif. 


8.00 


10 


Chicago, 111. 


47.00 


82 


Haverhill, Mass. 


10.00 


668 


Palo Alto, Calif. 


4.00 


21 


Chicago, 111. 


9.00 


107 


Worcester, Mass. 


30.00 


751 


Santa Rosa. Calif. 


14.00 


44 


Champaign, 111. 


15.00 


193 


North Adams, Mass. 


30.00 


771 


Watsonville. Calif. 


10.00 


58 


Chicago, 111. 


660.00 


275 


Newton. Mass. 


3.00 


829 


Santa Cruz. Calif. 


3.00 


62 


Chicago, III. 


3.00 


390 


Holyoke, Mass. 


30.00 


848 


San Bruno, Calif. 


10.00 


80 


Chicago, 111. 


46.00 


624 


Brockton, Mass. 


13.00 


981 


Petaluma, Calif. 


20.00 


181 


Chicago, 111. 


10.00 


756 


Bellingham, Mass. 


10.00 


1052 


Hollywood, Calif. 


100.00 


189 


Quincy, 111. 


38.00 


1121 


Boston. Mass. 


40.00 


1149 


San Francisco, Calif. 


10.00 


419 


Chicago, 111. 


77.00 




MICHIGAN 




1158 
1235 
1280 
1335 
1358 
1400 
1407 
1408 
1478 
1497 
1583 
1599 


Berkeley, Calif. 
Modesto. Calif. 
Mountain View, Calif. 
Wilmington, Calif. 
La Jolla, Calif. 
Santa Monica. Calif. 
San Pedro, Calif. 
Redwood City, Calif. 
Redondo. Calif. 
E. Los Angeles, Calif. 
Englewood, Calif. 
Redding, Calif. 


10.00 
15.00 

6.00 

2.00 
15.00 
11.00 

2.00 
16.00 

1.00 
20.00 

5.00 
10.00 


434 

605 

643 

644 

661 

839 

1128 

1188 

1307 

1317 

2087 

2094 


Chicago, III. 
Golconda, 111. 
Chicago. 111. 
Pekin. 111. 
Ottawa, 111. 
Des Plaines. 111. 
La Grange. 111. 
Mt. Carmel, 111. 
Evanston. III. 
East Chicago, 111. 
Crystal Lake. 111. 
Chicago, 111. 


101.00 

4.00 

22.00 

28.00 

11.00 

21.00 

10.00 

1.00 

17.00 

20.00 

4.00 

46.00 


116 

334 

337 

512 

898 

982 

1191 

1449 

1615 

2065 

2585 


Bay City, Mich. 
Saginaw. Mich. 
Detroit. Mich. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
St. Joseph. Mich. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Lansing. Mich. 
Lansing. Mich. 
Grand Rapids. Mich. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Saginaw, Mich. 


3.00 
37.00 
47.00 
10.00 
25.00 
28.00 
20.00 

1.00 
10.00 
17.00 

1.00 


1607 


Los Angeles. Calif. 


20.00 










MINNESOTA 




1632 


San Luis Abispo. Calif 


. 40.00 




INDIANA 




7 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


11.00 


1789 


Bijou, Calif. 


7.00 


113 


Chesterton, Ind. 


6.00 


596 


St. Paul, Minn. 


8.00 


1903 


Grass Valley, Calif. 


11.00 


133 


Terre Haute, Ind. 


12.00 


1252 


St. Paul. Minn. 


2.00 


1976 


Los Angeles. Calif. 


14.00 


352 


Anderson, Ind. 


4.00 


1429 


Little Falls. Minn. 


4.00 


1992 


Placerville, Calif. 


13.00 


533 


Jeffersonville. Ind. 


11.00 


1644 


Minneapolis. Minn. 


56.00 


2048 


Corona, Calif. 


26.00 


565 


Elkhart, Ind. 


20.00 








2203 


Anaheim, Calif. 


2.00 


599 


Hammond. Ind. 


50.00 




MISSISSIPPI 




3193 


Colton. Calif. 


7.00 


694 


Boonville. Ind. 


10.00 


1471 


Jackson, Miss. 


36.00 








758 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


4.00 


2352 


Corinth. Miss. 


1.00 




COLORADO 




1076 


Washington, Ind. 


15.00 








418 


Greeley. Colo. 


6.00 


1142 


Lawrenceburg. Ind. 


20.00 




MISSOURI 










1 155 


Columbus, Ind. 


1.00 


5 


St. Louis. Mo. 


39.00 




CONNECTICUT 




1485 


La Porte. Ind. 


2.00 


47 


St. Louis, Mo. 


97.00 


79 


New Haven, Conn. 


80.00 








185 


St. Louis. Mo. 


7.00 


196 


Greenwich, Conn. 


21.00 




IOWA 




618 


Sikeston, Mo. 


5.00 


216 


Torrington. Conn. 


8.00 


106 


Des Moines, Iowa 


56.00 


978 


Springfield. Mo. 


67.00 


260 


Waterbury, Conn. 


6.00 


373 


Fort Madison, Iowa 


7.00 


1329 


Independence, Mo. 


14.00 


746 


Norwalk, Conn. 


11.00 


641 


Fort Dodge. Iowa 


3.00 


1839 


Washington, Mo. 


12.00 


825 


Willimantic, Conn. 


20.00 


1260 


Iowa City. Iowa 


6.00 


2030 


St. Genevieve, Mo. 


1 2.00 




DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 


1835 


Waterloo, Iowa 


10.00 


205" 

::i4 


Kirksville. Mo. 
Festus. Mo. 


2.00 
20.00 


2311 


Washington, D.C. 


15.00 




KANSAS 




3244 


Potosi, Mo. 


20.00 


2456 


Washington. D.C. 


20.00 


















201 


Wichita, Kansas 


1.00 




MONTANA 






FLORIDA 




1587 


Hutchison. Kansas 


4.25 


153 


Helena. Mont. 


9.00 


696 


Tampa, Fla. 


2.00 








286 


Great Falls. Mont. 


1 .00 


727 


Hialeah, Fla. 


10.00 




KENTUCKY 




557 


Bozeman, Mont. 


6.00 


1250 


Homestead. Fla. 


10.00 


442 


Hopkinsville, Ky. 


24.00 


718 


Havre. Mont. 


3.00 


1394 


Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 


26.00 


698 


Newport. Ky. 


36.00 


1172 


Billings. Mont. 


11.00 


1725 


Daytona Beach, Fla. 


12.00 


785 


Covington. Ky. 


20.00 


121 1 


Glasgow. Mont. 


3.00 


1927 


Delray Beach. Fla. 


40.00 


1737 


Corbin. Ky. 


10.75 








2217 


Lakeland, Fla. 


10.00 


2049 


Gilbertsville, Ky. 


10.00 




NEBRASK \ 




2261 


Ft. Myers, Fla. 


2.00 


2058 


Frankfort. Ky. 


7.00 


253 


Omaha, Nebraska 


13.00 


2340 


Bradenton, Fla. 


5.00 


3223 


Elizabethtown, Ky. 


8.00 


1055 


Lincoln. Nebraska 


60.00 



MARCH, 1969 



25 



L.U. No. City & State 



Amount L.U. No. City & State 



Amount L.U. No. City & State 



Amount 



1187 Grand Island, Nebraska 9.00 

1430 Kearney, Nebraska 3.00 

2141 Scottsbluff, Nebraska 5.00 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1031 Dover, N.H. 5.00 

1616 Nashua, N.H. 20.00 

NEW JERSEY 

15 Hackensack, N.J. 39.00 

119 Newark, N.J. 14.00 

139 Jersey City, N.J. 15.00 

299 Union City, N.J. 28.00 

306 Newark, N.J. 40.00 

455 Somerville, N.J. 13.00 

482 Jersey City, N.J. 10.00 

486 Bayonne, N.J. 40.00 

564 Jersey City, N.J. 6.00 

842 Pleasantville, N.J. 26.00 

1209 Newark, N.J. 108.00 

1493 Pompton Lake, N.J. 18.00 

2250 Red Bank, N.J. 8.00 

NEW MEXICO 

1962 Las Cruces, N.M. 7.00 





NEW YORK 




6 


Amsterdam, N.Y. 


30.00 


20 


New York, N. Y. 


158.00 


146 


Schenectady, N.Y. 


21.00 


203 


Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 


15.00 


240 


East Rochester, N.Y. 


1.00 


284 


New York, N.Y. 


60.00 


301 


Newburgh, N.Y. 


45.00 


322 


Niagara Falls, N.Y. 


10.00 


350 


New Rochelle, N.Y. 


20.00 


355 


Buffalo. N.Y. 


27.00 


357 


Islip, N.Y. 


22.00 


374 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


11.00 


493 


Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 


11.00 


608 


New York, N.Y. 


140.00 


689 


Dunkirk, N.Y. 


7.00 


747 


Oswego, N.Y. 


40.00 


754 


Fulton, N.Y. 


20.00 


791 


New York, N.Y. 


40.00 


808 


New York, N.Y. 


44.00 


835 


Seneca Falls, N.Y. 


18.00 


950 


New York, N.Y. 


112.00 


964 


Rockland Co., N.Y. 


68.00 


1038 


Ellenville, N.Y. 


1.00 


1075 


Hudson, N.Y. 


9.00 


1134 


Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 


35.00 


1150 


Kingston, N.Y. 


10.00 


1318 


Farmingdale, N.Y. 


12.00 


1377 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


8.00 


1397 


North Hempstead, N.Y. 


73.00 


1401 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


10.00 


1577 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


18.00 


1704 


Carmel Kent, N.Y. 


2.00 


1772 


Hicksville, N.Y. 


46.00 


1921 


Hempstead, N.Y. 


173.00 


1973 


Riverhead, N.Y. 


1.00 


1978 


Buffalo, N.Y. 


2.00 


2117 


Flushing, N.Y. 


52.00 


2161 


Catskill, N.Y. 


60.00 


2236 


New York, N.Y. 


30.00 


2287 


New York, N.Y. 


33.00 


2765 


Nassau Co., N.Y. 


40.00 


3211 


Herkimer, NY. 


5.00 



1492 



29 
200 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Hendersonville, N.C. 

OHIO 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Columbus, Ohio 



2.00 



40.00 
258.00 



245 Cambridge, Ohio 16.00 

372 Lima, Ohio 32.00 

415 Cincinnati, Ohio 9.00 

650 Pomeroy, Ohio 11.00 

873 Cincinnati, Ohio 1.00 

976 Marion, Ohio 20.00 

1079 Steubenville, Ohio 20.00 

1108 Cleveland, Ohio 36.00 

1180 Cleveland, Ohio 10.00 

1311 Dayton, Ohio 20.00 

1365 Cleveland, Ohio 2.00 

1393 Toledo, Ohio 15.00 

1426 Elyria, Ohio 40.00 

1629 Ashtabula, Ohio 1.00 

1720 Athens, Ohio 29.00 

1750 Cleveland, Ohio 15.00 

1802 New Philadelphia, Ohio 7.00 

2077 Columbus, Ohio 50.00 

2180 Defiance, Ohio 12.00 
2248 Piqua, Ohio 2.00 
2338 Wadsworth, Ohio 1.00 
2783 Columbus, Ohio 20.00 

OKLAHOMA 

329 Oklahoma City, Okla. 25.00 

763 Enid, Okla. 3.00 

986 McAlester, Okla. 2.00 

1060 Norman, Okla. 15.00 

OREGON 

226 Portland, Ore. 10.00 

738 Portland, Ore. 25.00 

1120 Portland, Ore. 86.00 

1157 Lebanon, Ore. 12.00 

1388 Oregon City, Ore. 10.00 

1848 New Port, Ore. 4.00 

2066 St. Helens, Ore. 6.00 

2181 Corvallis, Ore. 7.00 
2416 Portland, Ore. 26.00 
2621 Coos Bay, Ore. 10.00 
2627 Cottage Grove, Ore. 10.00 
2691 Coquille, Ore. 9.00 
2714 Dallas, Ore. 14.00 
2851 La Grande, Ore. 40.00 
2949 Roseburg, Ore. 7.00 
3009 Grants Pass, Ore. 1.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

228 Pottsville, Pa. 10.00 

230 Pittsburgh, Pa. 35.50 

239 Easton, Pa. 10.00 

261 Scranton, Pa. 50.00 

263 Bloomsburg, Pa. 9.00 

268 Sharon, Pa. 35.00 

401 Pittston, Pa. 10.00 

462 Greensburg, Pa. 1.00 

465 Ardmore, Pa. 40.00 

514 Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 20.00 

616 Chambersburg. Pa. 16.00 

691 Williamsport, Pa. 14.00 

773 Braddock, Pa. 6.00 

1000 Greenville, Pa. 10.00 

1044 Charleroi, Pa. 44.00 

1160 Pittsburgh, Pa. 12.00 

1285 Allentown, Pa. 5.00 

1333 State College, Pa. 150.00 

1419 Johnstown, Pa. 37.00 

1562 North Wales, Pa. 8.00 

1595 Conshohocken, Pa. 16.00 

1856 Philadelphia, Pa. 40.00 

2194 Philadelphia, Pa. 10.00 

2264 Pittsburgh. Pa. 20.00 

RHODE ISLAND 

1695 Providence, R.I. 6.00 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

1798 GTeenville, S.C. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

783 Sioux Falls, S.D. 

TENNESSEE 
2082 Kinsport, Tenn. 
2132 LaFollette, Tenn. 
2473 Bristol, Tenn. 
3148 Memphis, Tenn. 

TEXAS 

198 Dallas, Tex. 

213 Houston, Tex. 

304 Denison, Tex. 

1097 Longview, Tex. 

1201 Borger, Tex. 

1822 Fort Worth, Tex. 

VERMONT 

590 Rutland, Vermont 
VIRGINIA 

303 Portsmouth, Va. 
331 Norfolk, Va. 
396 Newport News, Va. 
2070 Roanoke, Va. 

WASHINGTON 

98 Spokane, Wash. 

131 Seattle, Wash. 

338 Seattle, Wash. 

562 Everett, Wash. 

870 Spokane, Wash. 

954 Mt. Vernon, Wash. 

1054 Everett, Wash. 

1148 Olympia, Wash. 

1289 Seattle, Wash. 

1368 Seattle, Wash. 

1532 Anacortes, Wash. 

1707 Kelso-Longview, Wash. 

1715 Vancouver, Wash. 

2628 Centralia, Wash. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

428 Fairmont, W. Va. 
1228 Bluefield, W.Va. 
1339 Morgantown, W. Va. 
1574 Weirton, W. Va. 
1755 Parkersburg, W. Va. 
2427 White Sulphur Springs, 

W. Va. 
2430 Charleston, W. Va. 

WISCONSIN 

252 Oshkosh, Wise. 

319 Waukesha, Wise. 

1074 Eau Claire, Wise. 

1538 West Allis, Wise. 

1582 Milwaukee, Wise. 

1709 Ashland, Wise. 

1733 Marshfield, Wise. 

2073 Milwaukee. Wise. 

2544 Shawano, Wise. 

3187 Watertown, Wise. 

WYOMING 

1384 Sheridan, Wyo. 
1564 Casper, Wyo. 



16.00 



4,00 



123.00 
13.00 
10.00 
20.00 



25.00 
40.00 

2.00 
10.00 

5.00 
29.00 

10.00 

4.00 

10.00 

3.00 

5.00 

22.00 

35.50 

7.00 

8.00 

7.00 

2.00 

5.00 

12.00 

6.00 

10.00 

10.00 

14.00 

20.00 

6.00 

16.00 
2.00 
8.00 

10.00 
5.00 

4.00 
20.00 



4.00 

10.00 

5.00 

1.00 

5.00 

15.00 

1.00 

56.00 

13.00 

10.00 



6.00 
10.00 



EDITOR'S NOTE: Our listing of 
CLIC contributions which appeared in 
the January CARPENTER placed the 
$40 contribution of Local 2008. Ponca 
City, Okla., under the Oregon listing by 
mistake. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



UNION INDUSTRIES SHOW 






I 




DENVER CONVENTION CENTER 

EXHIBITION HALL 

MAY 16-21, 1969 

SPONSOR: AFL-CIO Union Label and 
Service Trades Department 

EXHIBITS: Approximately 300 exhibits 

showing union-made products and 

demonstrating union services. 

PRIZES: $100,000 in free prizes to 
those attending the show. 

FREE ADMISSION: Admission to the show 
is free to the public. 

THE WORLD'S LARGEST LABOR-MANAGEMENT EXPOSITION. 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



Albert Fournier 
(Jumpin' Catfish) 



■ Poetic Justice 

Readers may recall a poem carried 
in a past issue of this column entitled 
"The Luck of the Limberlost," portray- 
ing fishing on the Sesach River in Idaho 
and written by Charles Anderson of New 
Plymouth, Idaho, a long time member of 
Local 426 at Payette. Brother Anderson 
and party really hit the game-bird jack- 
pot, scoring limits of pheasants on open- 
ing day. Here's a photograph depicting 
results of the opening day's hunt, 1. to r.: 
Anderson, son Kent and son-in-law Ray 
Kreps. OK, Brother Anderson, we're 
ready for another one of your poems. 

■ Much Moose 

A note and photograph from Charles 
M. Dunn, business representative of Lo- 
cal 976, Marion, Ohio, brings us up to 
date on an outstanding hunt achievement 
for Brother Dan Burggraf, also a mem- 
ber of Local 976. Here graphic evidence: 
Dan straddles giant bull moose that 
sported 13 points and was downed near 
Bellatere, Quebec. The rack, which had 
a 44-in. spread, wound up as trophy on 
wall of T.V. room in Burggraf residence. 

■ Fleet Pheasant 

Getting back to the subject of pheasants, 
it appears that one of those critters, in 
Nebraska, thinks it is a dog or some- 
thing. I'm talking about one gaudy ring- 
neck in particular, referred to as "Sport" 
by farmer Bob Nutt of Madrid, Nebras- 
ka. For over three years running, "Sport" 
has greeted Bob with an arrogant strut 
and "crowing" when he arrives to work 
in the fields. The bird races alongside 
the tractor as he proceeds to cultivaate 
the field, keeping up the chase 'til it is 
completely winded, then it takes off into 
nearby cover for parts unknown. Nutt 
says he's clocked the bird at speeds up to 
18 miles per hour. 

■ Jumpin'' Catfish! 

Whereas "Sport" the pheasant might 
think it is a dog, a channel catfish, 




Anderson and friends 
(Poetic Justice) 




Dan Burggraf 
(Much Moose) 



i-;,T 



■ % 



m>m 



ISM/ 



Hi 






mmmmmmM 



Sport (Fleet Pheasant) 



caught by Albert J. Fournier of Oroville, 
California, a member of Local 1240, 
gave every indication of believing it was 
something else. Brother Fournier is de- 
picted on the following photograph with 
a 18V2-lb. channel cat he nipped from 
the deep, fish-lush waters of Hansen 
Dame Lake in the San Fernando Valley. 
Al — using a glob of worms for bait — 
hooked the chunky finster near the bot- 
tom and it raced topside to break the 
lake's surface, in bass-like fashion, with 
four successive leaps. Here's a photo- 
graph of Brother Fournier with his cat- 
fish, which thought it was a bass. 

■ Rabbit Punch 

When a hunter kicks a rabbit out of 
a brush patch, it hardly rates a line in 
print, but when a rabbit kicks back, I 
believe that's news. Recently called to 
our attention was a story out of Chicago 
involving Donald Hargadon, a worker at 
the Augustana Hospital. He was injured 
while trying to transport "Jumbo," a 
huge male rabbit, used for research, to 
the Lincoln Park Childrens' Zoo. A cou- 
ple of licks and scratches from Jumbo 
sent Hargadon to the hospital — as a 
patient. 

■ Back Casts 

. . . One of the largest crappie we've 
heard about in many a moon can be 
chalked up for 
Joseph A. Naleppa 
of Edinboro, Pa., 
a member of Local 
571. Here's graph- 
ic proof of Broth- 
er Naleppa's feat 
— a 2-lb., 6-oz. 
crappie from 
Edinboro Lake, 
caught this past 
summer. 

. . . Not all of those lunker trout are 
caught by western anglers. Dan Baugniet 
of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, a member of 




28 



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OUTDOOR MEANDERINGS 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Local 1533, eased a pair of dandies from 
the East Twin River near Mishicot. Wis- 
consin. Using light spin gear, topped off 
with a silver Mepps spinner, he creeled 
a rainbow that tipped the scales at 814 
pounds and a German brown that meas- 
ured 20 inches down the back. 

. . . Shades of the "good old days," 
here's a photograph sent in by Brother 
Arnold Bohrer of Hazen, North Dakota, 
a member of Local 1032, Minot. Brother 
Bohrer says these deer were taken by 
himself and party in 1945. from an area 
that has since been flooded by the Gar- 
rison Dam. 




Shades of Old Days for Bohrer 
MARCH. 1969 



. . . We hear that Bud Garner of 
Farmington, Michigan, a member of Lo- 
cal 998. has been hitting the finny jack- 
pot quite regularly. Recent catches in- 
clude three Coho (silver) salmon from 
Loon Lake, all of which weighed around 
10 pounds each, and a lunker northern 
pike from Lake Ogascanan in Quebec 
that measured 44 inches longways. 

. . . Another member of the Brother- 
hood who can lay claim to downing a 
big moose is Faulke Nelson of Glen 
Ellyn. Illinois, a member of Local 13. 
Chicago. In company with Herb Hansen, 
he downed a bull moose in the wild- 
woods about 63 miles north of Port 
Arthur. Canada which weighed 975 
pounds. 

■ Sturdy Sturgeon 

The Northwest can lay claim lo having 
the largest freshwater denizen of the na- 
tion linning in its waters, namely the 
sturgeon. We've devoted a good share 
of column space to sturgeon tales— some 
documented, some legendary — tales of 
monsters over a thousand pounds, one 
in particular thai pulled a farmer's horse 
into the river. But according to the 
record, the largest taken on rod and reel 
must be credited lo Willard Cravens who, 
on April 24. 1456. eased a 360-lb. 




specimen from the waters of the Snake 
River in Idaho. It measured, nose to 
tail, nine inches short of ten feet. 



DENVER 
COLORADO 




MAY IB-SI, 1969 



UNION LABEL AND SERVICE TRADES DEPT..AFL CIO 

29 



L.U. NO. 13, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Domina, Joseph A. 
Hanahan. Thomas J., Sr. 
Krejci, Gregory C. 
Loftus, Martin J. 
Nevrly, Anton 
Petrone, Gaetano 
Sampson, John H. 
Schlotz, Christian J. 
Sexton, M. James 
Shea, Michael 
Thelan, William A. 
Vogt, Adolph 
Welsh, Sydney 
Williams, Cecil G. 

L.U. NO. 22, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Alajoki, Oscar 
Bertellotti, E. 
Bettis, John A. 
Blankenship, Melvin 
Borneman, B. J. 
Burrows, B. 
Dewlaney. Keith 
Domars, N. 
Fazio, Alfred M. 
Finnie, William 
Forster, Gus W. 
French, Louis, D. 
Hengel, Charles 
Johnson, G. C. 
Kendall, H. J. 
Larson, Alvar F. 
Lewis, Llloyd J. 
Narlock, Leo P. 
Nelson, Jack H. 
Peach, W. M. 
Perruquet, A. 
Ross, John A. 
Schaffert, William M. 
Sherard, David M. 
Stanley, George E. 
Stenerson, Palmer 
Suttle. Armogene 
Thompson, Walter 
Thomson, George T. 
Trump, H. 
Twiss, Claude 
Venetz, Andrew A. 
White, Vernon E. 
Zander, Oscar 

L.U. NO. 30, 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Allard, Clifford 
Blair, Clayton E. 
Robish, George 

L.U. NO. 31, 
TRENTON, N.J. 

Deitrich, Joseph A., Sr. 
Graf, Herman 
Holtzhammer, Frank 
Keller, Joseph 
Longevin, Mitchell 
Yuhas, Peter 

L.U. NO. 40, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Knudsen, Hans 
Stevenson, David 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Eisenhower, William 
Greenlee, S. P. 

30 



L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Burns, John J. 
Degregorio, Louis 
Finnegan, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 60, 
INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Botsford, Charles 
Huffman, Charles 
Wells, James W. 

L.U. NO. 61, 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Hallam, Henry Lee 
Owens, Jesse L. 
Reiser, William L. 
Santamaria, Gusteno 

L.U. NO. 62, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Olson, Albert E. 
Cook, Herbert 
Graham, Arthur 
McCarthy. John J. 
Pernaravicius, Bronius 

L.U. NO. 88, 
ANACONDA, MONT. 

Reed, John H. 

L.U. NO. 90, 
EVANSVILLE, IND. 

Arnsman, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Barnes, Harry W, 
Chenowith, William E. 
Eyler, Raymond E. 
France, Adam 
Grube, Richard 
Long, W. C. 
McCormack, Dennis J. 
O'Connell, Edward J. 
Rones, Clyde 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZELTON, PA. 

Bonner, John 
Bubrowski, Alex W. 
Mehalek, George J. 
Strack, George F. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Bailey, R. H. 
Bang, Charles 
Edwards, George M. 
Hayden, Richard B. 
McGrady, Joseph B. 
Ohm, George B. 
Paquette, Ralph S. 

L.U. NO. 133, 
TERRE HALITE, IND. 

Baxter, Albert 
Hall. Ray 
Phillips, Fred 
Shaw, Charles 
Swalley, Harley 
Taylor, Thomas 
Woodard, Ray 

L.U. NO. 157, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Cohen. Israel 
Liberman, Barney 
Magazine, Harry 



Schwartz, Myer 
Shugarman, Harry 

L.U. NO. 174, 
JOLIET, ILL. 

Kezerle, Anton 
Pisha, Henry L. 
Sandberg, Evald 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Carlsen, Alfred 
Christensen. Leonard 
Nielsen, N. Sogaard 
Woss, Albin J. 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Bryant, Robert B. 
Follis, J. C. 
Hooper, Hosea 
Morrow, Frank S. 
Smith, C. Arthur 

L.U. NO. 199, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Boss, William S. 
Cederberg, Eric W. 
Crane, Arthur R. 
Eck, Anthony J. 
Harmon, William A. 
Person, Gottard 
Placzkowski, Walter 
Severson, Art 
Slomczewski, Edward 

L.U. NO. 200, 
COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Bettes, Robert 
Francis, Dorsey 
Helms. J. P. 
Hillman, George 
Miller, Howard H. 
Morrison. Bruce 
Ruperd, Donald 

L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Ellis, George 
Grant, Robert B. 
Grimes, Daniel 
Parsons. Samuel 
Porter, Henry 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Greip, William 
Nissila, Waino 
Wiley, Harold 

L.U. NO. 242, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Wilson, Charles 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Lipsky, Sol 
Meuchner, Andrew 
Paslawsky, Michael 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Benz, Fred O. 
Frost, Karl 
Midili, Salvatore 
Nilson, Erik 
Palomaki, Francis H. 
Trampel, William 



L.U. NO. 261, 
SCRANTON, PA. 

Brandt, William 
Heidig, John 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG. PA. 

Morelock, George S. 

L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

Lisi, Frank 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Foster, J. S. (Scotty) 
Rooker, S. C. 

L.U. NO. 344, 
WAKESHA, WISC. 

Foster, Samuel 
Howard, Charles 
Nicholson, Algot 
Russ, Lawrence 

L.U. NO. 350, 

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. 

Carriero, S. G. 
Chiappenelli, Fred 
Terenzi, Serafino 
Werenskjold, Walter 

L.U. NO. 366. 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Dvoskin, Frank 
Freeman, Milton C. 

L.U. NO. 368, 
ALLENTOWN, PA. 

Dreisbach, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 390. 
HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Brodeur. Alfred 
Rioux, Irving 

L.U. NO. 434, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Gordon 
Beemsterboer, William, Sr. 
Berent, Joseph 
DeForte. Marcus 
Heidel, Roy 
Kedzie, Edward 
Klomp, Gerrit 
Nelson. Fabian 
Saunders, Thomas 
Sosnowski, Adolph 
Soulje, Christian 
Ton, Eugene 
Zuiker, Sam 

L.U. NO. 488, 
BRONX, N.Y. 

Anderson, John 
Hurme, Askel 
Johanson, Gustave 
Johnson, Bruno 
Matthews, James 
Rich, David 
Salvati, Louis 
Tietjens, William 
Vigeland, Anker 

L.U. NO. 531, 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 

Dehmel, Theodore 
Sandford, Arthur 



L.U. NO. 574 
MIDDLETOWN, N.Y. 

Cooper, Charles H. 

L.U. NO. 608, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Arvidsson, Karl 
Leeder, Jack 
Levin, Louis 
McGahon, James 
Rutledge, Burt 
Steingisser, David 
Stippo, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 657, 
SHEBOYGAN, WISC. 

Grunwald, George, Sr. 
Stahl, Frank 

L.U. NO. 674, 

MT. CLEMENS, MICH. 

Kerner, Herman 

L.U. NO. 791, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Brickman, George 
Johnson, Adolph 
Lundell, Helmer 
Pesonen, Gust 
Salvesen, Frank 
Stagg, George 
Vogel, Julius 
Zalewski, Edward 

L.U. NO. 848, 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Burke, Hamilton D. 
Houtchens, Harold 

L.U. NO. 929, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Bibby, William 
Black, Clarence E. 
Hallam, E. J. 
Hockenberry, C. W. 
Paulson, Kenneth N. 
Peters, James S. 
Smith, Vernon 
Tiner, William 

L.U. NO. 1029, 
JOHNSTON CITY, ILL. 

Hurbert, George 

L.U. NO. 1149, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Bradford, William 
Cheney, Frank, Jr. 
Oskar, Frank 
George, Anthony 
Rainey, Thomas 
Ripley, John 
Schneider, William 

L.U. NO. 1158, 
BERKELEY, CALIF. 

Brandt, Fred H. 
Parker, Leslie 
Westfall, Dan 
Whitaker, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Christianson. T. N. 
Nelson, Lawrence K. 
Porter, James W. 



THE CARPENTER 



L.U. NO. 1185. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Lehner. Richard F. 
Olson, Oscar J. 
Witek. Frank J. 

L.U. NO. 1266, 
AUSTIN, TEX. 

Doncaster, E. G. 

L.U. NO. 1292. 
HUNTINGTON. N.Y. 

Clarke, Peter 

L.U. NO. 1296, 

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. 

Adamske, Albert 
Bishop, Claude 
Champion. Henry 
Clady. Jacob. Sr. 
Duncan. Guy F. 
Hamon. William E. 
Jackson. Joseph E. 
Jones, Frank. Jr. 
Merriman, Fred L. 
Middleton. Elbert L. 
Moran, Clyde 
Robertson, Nolan E. 
Ruggles, John J. 
Seamster, James 
Thu, Lowell 
Whitmarsh. P. S. 
Wilson, Augusta 

L.U. NO. 1301, 
MONROE, MICH. 

Siebert, John 

L.U. NO. 1423, 

CORPUS CHRIST!, TEX. 

Dentler, A. W. 
Rohan, Alton E. 

L.U. NO. 1452, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Burns, John 



Daszkiewicz, John 
Deering. Arthur 
Hampton, James 
Lanich, Robert 
Legeret, Lawrence 
Schwartz. Robert 
Walker, Donald 
Williams, Rowe 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Bersin, Adolf 
Bosby, Joseph 
Cheuvreux, Joseph 
Duffy, James 
Gleeson, Charles 
Knudsen. John 
Lindeman, Carl 
Paulsen, Hartvig 
Tucker, Edward 
Wallin. John 
Wikstrom, John 

L.U. NO. 1707, 
LONGVIEW, WASH. 

Averre, Franklin E. 
Bruening, Joseph J. 
Carr, Andrew L. 
Davis, Fred M. 
Garner, Lester E. 
Olson. A. H. 
Ruprecht, Charles Ray 
Weber, Martin H. 

L.U. NO. 1708, 
WHITE RIVER VALLEY, 
WASH. 

Bakken, Clarence 
Brown. Robert 
Harden, Charles G. 
McLaughlin. William 
Pettit, Alfred C. 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Hudgens, M. C. 



THE LONER 

The craftsman 
without a union 
is like a coyote 
howling some- 
where in the 
desert at a big. 
unfriendly moon. 
The craftsman 
with a union who 
stays home and 
gripes instead of 
presenting his 
view to his fellow 
members at a 
union meeting is 
just about as bad. 
Think about it! 




Art by Emmett Angell. Clifton. N.J. 



L.U. NO. 1846. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Bienaime, Louis 
Firmin, Irby 
Firmin. Percy 
Kimbrell. Dan 
Kyle. Curtis 
Jones, Joseph C. 
Mercadel, Frank L. 
Morales. Encarnation 
Vicknair, Leon 

L.U. NO. 1922, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Anderson, Fred 
Carlson. Gustav G. 
Cirocke, Gust 



Jarosky. Joseph F. 
Lieberman, Abe 
Scheef. William H. 

L.U. NO. 1925, 
COLUMBIA. MO. 

Armstrong. W. F. 
Long, John 
Nichols, Purl 
Westerman. Gene 

L.U. NO. 2161, 
CATSKILL, N.Y. 

Beemer, William 
Paolino, Martin 
Roe, Benjamin 
Woloson, Ben 



L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM. CALIF. 

Bauer. August 
Queen. Bert 
Woods. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 2274. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Sobolak, Edwin H. 

L.U. NO. 2415, 
VICTORIA. B. C. 

Hammond, Frank 

L.U. NO. 2842, 
FRANKFORT. IND. 

Saltsman. James Jerry 



Precisely tapered 
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headless 
nails. 



The hammer with the handle 
that packs its own punch 

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Fiberglass handle adds flex action to your swing, more drive 
to each stroke. 

Epoxy-bondcd filaments of unidirectional glass 
libers deliver punch all their own. Head is 
pcrmanentl) bonded to handle. 




True Temper manufactures a great 
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designs so you can team the right hammer 
with the right job. 



"Steel-Handled Rocket 7 Hammer 
With all the quality features! 
Strong tubular steel handle. 

16 ounces. (#AI6R) 



Grip is cushioned for comfort, 
won't slip wet or dry — even 
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Fiberglass-Handled 

Hammer — Id ounce. 
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Hand Sledge. Perfect for all-purpose use, 
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nail-pulling claws are not needed. 
Nonslip grip. 3 pound. (#403H) 



mUActian products for action people. Home, garden and lawn 
tools, golf shafts, fishing and ski equipment. /ffi/£ I EMPER 



MARCH, 1969 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of picfures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) EASTHAMPTON, MASS.— Four 
members of Local 1372 were honored 
for long-time membership at a smorgas- 
bord and dance held for members and 
their wives at Pulaski Hall in East- 
hampton. Left to right are Otto Irm- 
isher, 45-year member; Bernard Fleury, 
40-year member; Robert McGrath, busi- 
ness agent. Pioneer Valley District Coun- 
cil (Northampton, Easthampton and 
Greenfield locals); Richard Griffin, orga- 
nizer from the Worcester headquarters; 
Joseph Beretska and Otto Kurtz, both 
50-year members. Members unable to 
attend the ceremonies were: Herman 
Tauscher, 43-year member; Walter 
Heintze, 42-year member; Mortiz Tausch- 
er, 36-year member. The presentations 
were made by Paul Duclos of North- 
ampton, treasurer of the local. The 50- 
year members were awarded gold 
watches, the 35-year members received 
pins. 

(2) LAKE WORTH, FLA.— Local 
1308 held a pin presentation dinner at- 
tended by members and their wives at the 
Famous Restaurant to honor two mem- 
bers with 50 years of service, and four 
members with 25 years of service. 

Kenneth H. Moye, president of the 
Florida State Council of Carpenters and 
president of the local, was toastmaster 
and Herbert M. Schuette made the pin 
presentations. Special guests who ad- 
dressed the gathering were International 
Representative J. E. Sheppard and State 
Organizer Warren Conary. 

Charles Johnson and A. C. King were 




recipients of 50-year pins; Brother King 
has been financial secretary of the local 
for 47 years. Cecil Johnson, Hanson 
Oates, Ami Pooman and Otto Pooman 
received 25-year service pins. 

Members and officers are pictured, left 
to right: Ami Pooman, Otto Pooman, 
Charles Johnson, A. C. King, Herbert M. 
Schuette and Kenneth H. Moye. 

(3) MILWAUKEE, WISC. — Local 
2073 marked its Golden Jubilee Celebra- 
tion with an annual pin presentation cere- 
mony honoring members who have com- 
pleted at least 25 years of active service 
in the Brotherhood. Front row, seated, 
left to right: George Reinke, Herman 
Nielsen, Ben Lueneburg, Jacob Slaske, 
Albert Edwardson, 52 years; Ralph 
Bowes, Milwaukee District Council Busi- 



ness Manager; Joseph Jorgensen, 52 years; 
Peter Czamik, Adolph Christiansen, Os- 
car Seymer, Ernst Franke. Second row, 
left to right: Ernest Hanson, John Brunk- 
er, Roman Mogilka, Joseph Kwasniewski, 
Bert Kuklinski, William Frederickson, 
Frank Jurczyk, Anton Beyer, Richard 
Hohl, president, Local 2073; Harry Stan- 
check, Louis Witte, Erwin Bruss, Ray 
Hoenike, Mike Sokolowski, Clem Czap- 
inski. Back row, left to right: John J. 
Shopofski, Henry Piotrowski, Leonard 
Sigorski, Emil Schellong, Leo Warzon, 
Ron Stadler, president, State Council of 
Carpenters; Ray Gazinski, assistant busi- 
ness manager; Mike Balen, secretary, 
Milwaukee District Council; Frank Czar- 
nik, Frank Skornia, Henry Kempinski, 
Alfred Karsten. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 




(4) PITTSBURGH, Pa.— Local 230 re- 
cently held a 25-year pin presentation for 
members who have earned this honor. 
Pictured are some of the pin recipients 
and officers attending the ceremony. 
Seated, left to right: Raymond Stein- 
hauser, financial secretary; William Fox; 
Joseph Saracco; John Stubenrauch; 
Lawrence Dunsey; August Mungai; Har- 
vey Strickler; Joseph Stumpf; Robert 
Seiling; Carl Meyer; Harry Schorr, re- 
cording secretary; and Joseph Ruffing, 
president of the local. Second row, left 
to right: William LeJeune; Robert Ar- 
gentine, business representative, Local 
142; William Schaad; Roy Pastorius; 
Fred Velan; Albert Dobbins; Fred Fun- 
aiock; Michael Fischer; Robert Jarvie; 
Edward Fahrner; Arthur Dovedot; Earl 
Miller; Frank Sturm and Harold Sturm. 
Back row, left to right: George Smith, 
vice president; Edward Diebold; Joseph 
Raber; John Bissell; Fred Schroeder; 
Everett Wilson; Michael Nath; Thomas 
Ruffing; Alvin Allwes; David McMillen; 
Carl Rosleck and Eugene Kast. 

Refreshments were served following the 
presentation, and an enjoyable time was 
had by all who attended. 

(5) SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH— A 

recognition dinner attended by more than 
100 members and guests was held by 
Local 184 for the purpose of honoring 
members who have attained 50 and 25 
years of service in the Brotherhood. Pre- 
ceding the pin presentation was a wel- 
coming address by President Marvin 
Davis and greetings from International 



Representative Bud Bryant on behalf of 
President Hutcheson and the General 
Office. 

An excellent dinner was served by 
members of the Ladies Auxiliary No. 218. 
The committee was composed of these 
ladies: Aileen Cropper, Chairman; Min- 
nie Young; Martha Larson; Thelma 
Rudd; Afton Highley; Vee Gehring; 
Donna Rosenlof; Lola Meadows; Marge 
Bonner; Eddie Fisher; Roxie Varney; and 
June Pierce, Local Union Secretary. 

Highlighting the entire program was 
the presentation of membership pins and 
certificates. J. W. Askee and Harry E. 
Mabey were the only recipients of 50- 
year awards. Members who received 50- 
and 25-year pins are pictured, seated, left 
to right: Roy Gehring, financial secretary; 
Fred Meadows, trustee; Howard Pace, 
Utah District Council representative; S. 
L. DiBella, treasurer and business agent; 
Bud Bryant, International Representative; 
J. W. "Bill" Askee and Harry E. Mabey, 
50-year members; Marvin Davis, presi- 
dent; Arthur H. Gordon, vice president; 
and Wallis P. Rosenlof, recording secre- 
tary. Second row, left to right: Donald 
O. Babcock, Virgil Blackson, Robert 
Blaine, Hyrum Bond, Ray Bonner, Lee 
Carlson, Ernald Christiansen, Milton 
Cundick, John H. Cox, Raymond F. 
Dean, Robert Erickson, Delamar Fair- 
banks, James Farmvorth, Alvin E. Fors, 
and Weldon A. Freeman. Third row, 
left to right: R. R. Gallagher, Hugh Goff, 
H. M. Hamhlin, L. R. Jefferies, Anton 
Johanson, Ronald Jorgensen, Gilbert J. 



Kimball, Allen C. Larsen, Dal Ion A. Lar- 
sen, Oscar Levine, Manuel Lobato, Elmer 
Moore, William J. Nelson, John O. W. 
Nielson, Irvin R. Perkins, and John M. 
Peterson. Back row, left to right: Walter 
Sjogren, Dale Streeper, Leon Streeper, 
V. N. Swenson, Harry L. Swofford, An- 
drew Tucker, and S. D. Wilkinson. 
Twenty-five-year awards also have been 
presented to the following members who 
were unable to attend: John H. Anderson, 
Harry J. Blaine, Jack Braithwaite, Ken- 
neth Chapman, Harold E. Clement, 
Charles Conti, Clarence Dean, Don M. 
Green, William Kremin, E. C. Lam- 
bourne, Kenneth R. Larsen, Elmer H. 
Longmore, Elden R. Mechan, Ezra Mil- 
ler, Vincent Patience, Albert C. Pehrson, 
Lon Rasmussen, Ray Robinson, Myron 
Roundy, Henry Streed, John Stroh. Del- 
mus Thompson, Frank P. Walker, Chaun- 
cey L. Webb, and Stanley Williams. 

The Awards Committee, responsible 
for coordinating the affair, included: Roy 
Gehring, chairman; Marvin Davis, Ar- 
thur H. Gordon, Wallis Rosenlof. S. L. 
DiBella, Fred Meadows. William Chap- 
lin, William Ressler, Clifford Adams, 
Alex Knapp, and Donald Gilman. 

In the opinion of the "old timers" who 
attended, the affair was a great success. 
They expressed their appreciation, not 
only for the awards, but for the oppor- 
tunity to get together with old friends. 
Their enjoyment made the efforts of 
those who contributed in any way to the 
success of this occasion very much 
worthwhile. 




MARCH, 1969 



33 




(6) HACKENSACK, N.J.— A special 
buffet luncheon, served by the entertain- 
ment committee, was held to honor more 
than 100 members who have achieved at 
least 25 years of continuous membership 
in Local 15. 

Special recognition was extended to 
Duncan McCorkindale, the only member 
who has remained active in the local for 
69 years. Further, this local is proud to 
say that there are currently over 400 
members who have devoted at least 25 
years of uninterrupted service to the 
Brotherhood. 

Service pins were presented to each 
member by Raleigh Rajoppi, General 
Executive Board member, who repre- 
sented the General Office. Senior mem- 
bers honored for 50 YEARS OF SERV- 
ICE OR MORE were: August Schiefer, 
Thomas J. Dennis, Victor Kurtzo, Gun- 
nar Anderson, Patrick J. Kelly, Kristian 
Bleik, Harry Hillenius, Chris Sorenson, 
Cornelius Ackerman, Michael Diana, 
Charles Finke, George Morss, Gustave 
Quist, Aaron Pukki and LeRoy Wester- 
velt. 40 TO 50 YEAR MEMBERS: Al- 
fred Anderson, Joseph Agner, John Ag- 
ner, Harry Blancbard, John Eberle, John 
Eckhardt, Robert Fincken, Henry Frank, 
John Harju, David Goetschuis, Rudolph 
Hartenstein, Harry Jacobs, Eino Kari, 
Victor Kantelo, Anton Krai, Peter Kur- 
achek, Frank Lofberg, George Hayn, 
Harry Mirandi, Arthur Nelson, Rudolph 
Seifert, Finley Strunk, Kosti Saainen, 
Henry Spotholz, Anders Svahn, Joseph 



Yavorski, John Van Saun and William 
Zounek. 25 TO 40 YEAR MEMBERS: 
L. Albert Anderson, Carl E. Anderson, 
Carl G. Anderson, Aanen Aanensen, Her- 
man Ackerman, S. J. Arcella, Peter 
Blomendaal, Herman A. Beneamer, An- 
drew Badaracco, Paul Bengston, Lino 
Benzoni, John Bellizia, Otto Boelsche, 
Rocco Corizzo, Matthew Cramer, Albert 
Cook, Jr., Andrew Cutrona, David Dah- 
len, Walter Dahlen, Otto Christiansen, 
Richard Bastian, Robert Bridges, Joseph 
Duffany, Benjamin DiNapoli, Alfred De- 
Donato, Jacob DeBoer, Henry Ericksen, 
William Ellin, Anthony Foschino, John 
Felix, Marinus Griep, Bernard Garris, 
Jacob Grinwis, E. G. Govertsen, Alex 
Giannotti, Jacob Giardini, Charles Hinck, 
Carl Gustafsen, John R. Gove, Peter 
Huisman, Cornelius Henches, John Krill, 
Charles Hollman, Walter Janssen, Arman 
A. Kivela, Jacob Kuiken, Alfred Kirk- 
patrick, Silvio Fillipelli, Theodore Ferber, 
William G. Keeney, Frank Linja, John 
Laamanen, Lars Lindstrom, Carl Lager- 
sted, Arva Laine, Bert Mulder, Harry 
Melber, Otto Menzel, Anton Malvik, An- 
thony Mannella, A. Montevechi, Stephen 
Miranda, Hugh Manbretti, Karl Menzel, 
Sr., George B. Nurmi, Albert O. Nelson, 
Philip Passantino, Anthony Putignano, 
Svend Rasmussen, Henry Siegers, John 
W. Sandberg, Elwood Seaman, John 
Warn, Henry Vanderhorn, Cornelious 
Van Ostenbridge, Nicholas Walters, 
James Walters, Steven Walacek, Peter 
Zuccone, William Yonkers, Julius Pier- 
grossi, Lynn Storie and Louis Petrie. 



(7) OBERLIN, OHIO — Mervin A. 
Schubert, right above, is pictured stand- 
ing beside the U.S. flag and beneath the 
charter for Local 1968 — both of which he 
has served long and faithfully. Paul 
Loper, president of the Lake Erie Dis- 
trict Council of Carpenters, presents 
Brother Schubert with his 50-year mem- 
bership pin. 

(8) PORTLAND, ORE.— Ceremonies 
were held recently honoring members of 
Local 226 who have devoted 25 and 50 
years of continuous service to the Broth- 
erhood. Three members received 50-year 
pins and 12 members were awarded 
25-year membership pins. Pictured, left 
to right: Noah Sutton, 50 years; Barnie 
Anderson, 50 years; Kenneth Davis, West 
Coast Coordinator for the Brotherhood; 
Herbert Dilley, 50 years; and Charles F. 
Miller, president of the local. 

(8A) Members with a minimum of 25 
years of service are shown, front row, 
left to right: Truman W. Kerns, Ervin L. 
Long, Roy LaCroix, August F. Warneke. 
Middle row, left to right: George H. 
Lingelbach, John M. Solvik, James W. 
Johnson, Walter G. Allen. Back row, 
left to right: C. T. Johnston, Garfield 
Rickert, Glenn Shook, Einar Johnson, 
and Kenneth Davis, who presented the 
members with their awards. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




(9) TONAWANDA, N.Y.— Two lo- 
cals, 374 and 1577, held a combined 
meeting at the Carpenters Hall in Buffalo 
for the purpose of presenting senior mem- 
bers with 50- and 25-year membership 
pins. Herman F. (Buddy) Bodewes, 
President of the Buffalo District Council, 
is pictured presenting a 50-year service 
pin to Fred Drew. Brother Drew has been 
an active member for 51 years, and was 
the only member at this time receiving 
such high honors. 

(9A) Among those members receiving 
their 25-year service pins were, seated, 
left to right: Herman J. Bodewes, 46 
years; Fred Drew, 51 years; Alfred Mc- 
Gowan, 26 years; Peter Brown, Sr., 45 
years; Howard White, 42 years. Stand- 
ing, left to right: Paul Walters, 31 years; 
Fred C. Cooper, 26 years; Charles Valois, 

26 years; Frank Minneci, 27 years; Ron- 
ald Cameron, 34 years; Elmer Ouder- 
kirk, 31 years; August Brem, 31 years; 
Nelson Tremor, 29 years; Leonard Nasca, 

27 years; Herbert Krieger, 29 years. 

(10) AMARILLO, TEX.— Local 665 re- 
cently honored veteran members who 
have achieved 25 to 55 years of continu- 
ous service. There were 130 members in 
good standing who were eligible for mem- 
bership pins, although only 74 members 
were present at the ceremonies. Among 
those members receiving awards were, 
seated, left to right: S. L. Marable, 30 
years; Chester Smith, general representa- 



tive; J. M. Hobson, 50 years; Frederick 
Bull, General Executive Board Member, 
6th District; H. R. Cliver, 55 years; Ben 
Collins, general representative. Back row, 
left to right: M. B. Allen, 30 years; M. S. 
Wasson, 45 years; Ed Urton, 30 years; 
Ernest Smith, 45 years; Arch Crerar, 30 
years; Bill Williams, 40 years; L. W. 
Barrett, 45 years; Phil Almquist, 40 
years; Walter Goddard, 30 years; Holt 
Ballard, 30 years; Ed Doores, 30 years; 
Pete Exposito, 40 years; W. L. Carter, 
30 years; Ollie White, 30 years; Yancy 
Litle, 30 years; Karl Degenhardt, 45 
years; Monroe Litle, 30 years; Evan Phil- 
lips, 30 years. 

(10A) Members who were present at 
the ceremonies to receive 25-year pins 
were, kneeling, left to right: Howard Law- 
son, N. O. Arnold, D. K. Taylor, P. A. 
White, Tom Ridgon, Charles Sheffield and 



F. J. Stocker. Seated, left to right: T. F. 
McPherson, E. A. Baker, R. O. Sick, Lynn 
Jackson, W. R. Hill, C. P. Burnett, Wal- 
ter Baird, Dual Johnson, Jess Newman, 
R. E. Gatten, Sr., Roy Hunnicutt and 
Joe Miller. Back row, left to right: Fred- 
erick Bull, General Executive Board 
Member, 6th District; W. J. Jones, Carl 
Stover, Luther Day, Charles Samples, L. 
R. Cox, Marvin Bains, E. E. Pricer, I. F. 
Goodrich, Roy Beasley, Ed Doores, W. 
W. Byars, Eugene Bishop, O. H. Cox, 
R. Z. Kelly, W. E. Roberts, Lawrence 
Doose, Ben Collins, general representa- 
tive, C. C. York, W. W. Sandage, C. D. 
Coffee, L. C. Harrison, Allan Wilson, C. 
R. Bartley, W. J. Milligan, T. L. Abbott, 
H. W. Baker, E. E. Flanagan, Frank 
Thoma, O. L. Herron, Herman Smith, 
Q. J. Barker, Bruce Plummer, C. W. 
Smith and Chester Smith, general repre- 
sentative. 





10A 
MARCH, 1969 



35 




I 



& 



—to 



.wsa*» -«m 




11 




12A 

(11) LAFAYETTE, LA.— Local 1897 
recently held a pin presentation ceremony 
honoring those members who have been 
active in the Brotherhood for at least 

25 years. Pictured, left to right: Alpha 
Conques, 27 years; J. Nelson Broussard, 
27 years; Wattie Castain, 29 years; Jo- 
seph W. Begnaud, 26 years; P. L. Kidder, 

26 years; Joseph Richard, 26 years; L. 
F. Bernard, 26 years; James R. Wise, 26 
years; Joseph Aycock, 27 years. Wilton 
J. Richard, a 27-year member, was un- 
able to attend. Presenting the pins is 
Dennis O. Spears, general representative 
for Local 1897. 

(12) DIXON, ILL.— For their 25 years 
of fraternal concern and steadfast loyalty 
to the Brotherhood and to their local 
union, 33 members of Local 790 were 



honored at a banquet and pin presenta- 
tion ceremony last November. Special 
guests attending the banquet were C. A. 
Shuey, General Executive Board Mem- 
ber from District 3, and General Repre- 
sentative W. E. Corbin. Members seated, 
left to right: Roy Archer, 26 years; Wiley 
M. Collins, business representative, Local 
790; Vernon Anderson, 26 years; Ray 
Evans, 27 years. Second row, left to 
right: Lyle Pritchard, 26 years; Brother 
Shuey; Frank Glover, 27 years; William 
Prince, 27 years. Back row, left to right: 
Richard Groves, 26 years; William Pow- 
ell, 26 years; Kenneth Faulkner, 26 years; 
Glenn Mantsch, 27 years; and General 
Representative W. E. Corbin. 

(12 A) Also recognized and presented 
with 25-year service pins were, seated, 



left to right: Roy Willard, 31 years; Paul 
Gorski, 31 years; Jacob Full, 31 years; 
William Nunn, 35 years. Second row, 
left to right: Charles Fletcher, 32 years; 
Richard Maronde, 32 years; Warren 
Needham, 28 years; Brother Shuey; 
Loren Freeman, 31 years; Arthur White, 
30 years. Back row, left to right: Andrew 
Bryant, 34 years; Joseph Worden, 26 
years; Harold Witzleb, 31 years; Leslie 
Sharp, 28 years; General Representative 
W. E. Corbin; Clifford Gilroy, 31 years. 
Members unable to attend the ban- 
quet, but presented with membership pins 
included: Thomas Cline, 26 years; Ralph 
Glenn, 31 years; E. H. Mayfield, 27 
years; Richard Sarver, 26 years; Julias 
Studach, 33 years; Richard Thompson, 
27 years; Lawrence Wentling, 32 years; 
and Cecil Gittings, 30 years. 

(13) LOS ANGELES, CALIF.— Mem- 
bers of Local 2144 recently presented 
with 30-year membership pins are, left 
to right: John Arp, Frank Berquist, John 
Carlson, Wilbur Deeths, Laurence Geer, 
Edwin Gustafson, Per Gustafson, Gust 
Johnson, W. Medvedeff, Russell Miller, 
Ingman Peterson, Charles Raffel, Theo- 
dore Rode, Julius Schmidt, Harold Stur- 
geon, Carl Swanson, Hendy Wahlstrom, 
and B. S. Watson. Members unable to 
attend the ceremonies included: Hugo 
Anderson, John Atkinson, Victor Carl- 
son, Milton Campbell, Adam Cook, Ray 
Foy, Edward Johnson, Otto Keister, Art 
Lee, Sam Lowe, Glen Maxwell, Louis 
Moreno, B. K. Peterson, and John Tobin. 
Ralph Wallace, business representative 
for Local 2144, congratulated the mem- 
bers for their many accomplishments over 
the years. 

(13A) Also receiving their 25-year pins 
from Local 2144 were, seated left to 
right: Leo Bass, H. Benedict, W. Blue, 
J. Byrne, Gus Carlson, and Earl Clubb. 
Standing, left to right: B. H. Cobine, 
Leroy Dill, Gus Erickson, A. J. Graves, 
Fred Jacobsen, George Little, Oscar R. 
Lawrence, Louis Lane, Melvin Mesa, 
Floyd Mautz, Harold Mautz, Bennie 
Markham, Charles Orcutt, Swen Swen- 
son, Algot Swanson, Herman Tauscher, 
John Harrison, Homer Williams, and 
Ralph Wallace, business representative 
and financial secretary. Other members 
who were unable to attend the cere- 
monies included: W. Acree, C. Bacon, 
J. Bybee, B. Carr, J. Cvar, R. Erickson, 
Sam Hefti, J. Kruse, P. O. Loven, L. 
Lundstrom, F. McElroy, J. Norman, 
Oscar Pearson, James Reid, C. G. Sulis, 
and E. Thorbjornsen. 




13A 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




(14) LEHIGHTON, PA.— Local 2029 
recently held a dinner party honoring 16 
members who have devoted at least 25 
years of active service to the Brother- 
hood. Members seated, left to right: Wil- 
liam Reinbold, 46 years; Elmer Billig, 
30 years; Roy Green, 27 years; Herman 
Ahner, 31 years; Dewey Smith, 30 years; 
James Frantz, 30 years; Warren Foll- 
weiler, 27 years; and William Strohl, 27 
years. Back row, left to right: Walter 
Fries, business representative of the Le- 
high Valley District; John Daderko, 30 
years; Paul Serfass, 26 years; Elmer Zieg- 
enfuss, 27 years; Harrison Troutman, 30 
years; Joseph Brady, 27 years; Raymond 
Highland, 26 years; and John Kuzmiak, 
business representative of the Lehigh 
Valley District. 

Among the distinguished guests attend- 
ing the dinner was Harvey Reinbold, 95 
years of age, who has 61 years as a car- 
penter to his credit. 

(15) CHICAGO, ILL.— Members and 
officers of Local 1367 (Millnn.ui awarded 
gold pins to six Brothers in commemora- 
tion of their having fulfilled 50 years of 
active membership in the Brotherhood. 
Pictured, left to right: Simon Slav, Abe 
Rofkin, Ernest Palish, Martin Hendrick- 
son, Anton Gross, and Herbert Erickson. 
President Hommeland, who officiated at 
the pin presentation, is pictured third 
from the right. Following the ceremony 



[■■■■■IH91 




refreshments were served, rounding out 
an evening long to be remembered by 
all who attended. 

(16) LAWTON, OKLA.— Members of 
Local 1585 recently honored twenty -three 
25 and 50-year members at a Fish Fry 
and presented them with membership pins 
for their continuous and devoted service. 
The 30-year pin recipients are pictured, 
front row, left to right: Ray Wirth, John 
Plaxco, Ernest Cummings, Merl Wells. 
Back row, left to right: Dow Tedder, F. 
N. Ward, A. M. Gilland. 

(16A) 25-year pins were presented to, 
front row, kneeling, left to right: Joe 
Bryant, Jimmie Lyles, W. T. Evins. Mid- 
dle row, left to right: E. E. Cummings, 
Roy Rcece, Orvil Andrews, W. W. Cams, 



W. L. Bordon, Carl Townsend. Back row, 
left to right: Raymond Read, Russel Lo- 
rance, Elvin Sims, John Richardson, S. L. 
Pruett, Ernest Cummings, Jr., S. G. 
Farmer. 

(17) BARDONIA, N.Y.— (No Picture) 
— Late last year. Local 964 (covering 
Rockland County and vicinity) held its 
Eighth Annual Dinner-Dance at the 
Robynbrook Country Club in Spring 
Valley. The affair was attended by more 
than 500 carpenters and their friends. 
Among the distinguished guests in at- 
tendance were many from the Interna- 
tional Office in Washington, D. C. Two 
members, William McNeice and Grant 
Waldron, were awarded 50-year member- 
ship pins. Louis Knox was presented 
with a 25-year service pin. 




I6A 



MARCH, 1969 



37 




GOLDBLATT CATALOG 

OVER 1238 TOOLS 
THAT BUILDERS USE! 



CATALOG 
TODAY 



GOLDBLATT TOOL COMPANY 
521C Osage, Kansas City, Kans. 66110 



I would like more information. 
' Name 



Address^ 
City 



-Zip- 




LAYOUT LEVEL 

• ACCURATE TO 1/32" 

1 REACHES 100 FT. 

1 ONE-MAN OPERATION 

Save Time, Money, do a Better Job 
With This Modern Woter Level 

In just a few minutes you accurately set batters 
for slabs and footings, lay out inside floors, 
ceilings, forms, fixtures, and check foundations 
for remodeling. 

HYDROLEVEL is the old reliable water 
level with modern features. Toolbox size. 
Durable 7" container with exclusive reser- 
voir, keeps level filled and ready. 50 ft. 
clear tough 3/10" tube gives you 100 ft. of 
leveling in each set-up, with 
1/32" accuracy and fast one- 
man operation — outside, in- 
side, around corners, over 
obstructions. Anywhere you 
can climb or crawl! 

Why waste money on delicate %f*' 
instruments, or lose time and ac- 
curacy on makeshift leveling? Since 1950 
thousands of carpenters, builders, inside trades, 
etc. have found that HYDROLEVEL pays for 
itself quickly. 

Clip this ad to your business stationery 
and mail today. We will rush you a Hydro- 
level with complete instructions and bill 
you for only $7.95 plus postage. Or send 
check or money order and we pay the post- 
age. Satisfaction guaranteed or money back. 

Ask your tool dealer to order it for you. We 
allow the usual dealer discount on \i Doz. lots 
and give return-mail service. 

HYDROLEVEL 

925 DeSoto, Ocean Springs, Miss. 39564 
FIRST IN WATER LEVEL DESIGN SINCE 1950 




— LAKELAND NEWS — 

John Murphy, of Local Union 1922, Chicago, 111., arrived at the Home January 
6, 1969. 

Charles Robert Kelley, of Local Union 331, Norfolk, Va., arrived at the Home 
January 7, 1969. 

Arthur J. Koeller, of Local Union 160, Philadelphia, Pa., arrived at the Home 
January 9, 1969. 

Pearl L. Gould, of Local Union 240, E. Rochester, N. Y., returned to the Home 
as a resident January 20, 1969. 

Henry Falcy, of Local Union 15, Hackensack, N. J. died January 11, 1969. Burial 
was at Walden, N. Y. 

Sidney Raymo, of Local Union 12, Syracuse, N. Y., died January 27, 1969. Burial 
was at Syracuse. 

Eric Lind, of Local Union 101, Baltimore, Maryland, died January 30, 1969. He 
was buried in the Home cemetery. 

Members who visited the Home during January 1969: 



Joseph S. Neisch, Holiday, Fla., L.U. 

1456. 
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Meyer, Woodward, 

Okla., L.U. 1894. 
Mr. & Mrs. William C. Sumell, Hicks- 

ville. N.Y., L.U. 1772. 
Ralph S. Conrad, 7735 W. Addison St., 

Chicago, 111.. L.U. 10. 
Roy S. Conrad, 7735 W. Addison St., 

Chicago, 111., L.U. 80. 
Frank Presti, Chicago, 111. L.U. 1922. 
Frank Krantz, North Tonawanda, N.Y., 

L.U. 355. 
Joy, Brock, Amy, & Joseph Boita, Oak- 
lawn, 111., L.U. 1922 & 1477. 
John Miller, Chicago, 111., L.U. 242. 
Herman E. Dax, Kewaunee, Wise, L.U. 

1900. 
Eric Fredrickson, Manahawkin, N.J., 

L.U. 257. 
James W. Copithorne, Framingham, 

Mass., L.U. 860. 
Robert Johnson, Manahawkin, N.J., L.U. 

257. 
Lee R. Hively, Confield, Ohio, L.U. 1514. 
David Duikes, North Jackson, Ohio, 

L.U. 171. 
Andrew C Berquist, Chicago, 111. L.U. 

13. 
B. T. Kennedy, Miami, Fla., L.U. 132. 
Frank Erbeke, Jersey City, N.J., L.U. 

564. 
Theodore V. Warr, Erie, Pa., L.U. 81. 
Earl W. Williamson, Kettering, Ohio, 

L.U. 2248. 
Ray Cebalt, Detroit, Mich., L.U. 1452. 
Leonard B. Zimmerman, Grand Rapids, 

Mich., L.U. 335. 
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Soloman, Dist. of 

W. Pa., L.U. 1044. 
Clarence Backus, Hartford, Wise, L.U. 

2283. 
Guy W. Laudermilk, Baltimore, Md., 

L.U. 101. 
Henry P. Dobbeloor, Hasbrouck Hts., 

N.J., L.U. 1209. 
Tony Dannenberg, Holland. Mich., L.U. 

1908. 
Mr. & Mrs. John S. Acors, Washington, 

D.C., L.U. 1590. 
Cesare Polimeni, Newark, N.J., L.U. 

1613. 
Wm. A. Bill Bradley, Rautoul, 111., L.U. 

44. 
Clarence Steine, Mnpls., Minn., L.U. 7. 
Howard Almas, Detroit, Mich., L.U. 

1433. 
Henry Larsen, Ardley, N.Y., L.U. 1456. 
Joseph A. Ruflinl, Rochester, N.Y., L.U. 

231. 
James A. Wood, Dayton, Ohio, L.U. 

1004. 

(Continued 



John T. Childs, Salisbury, N.C, L.U. 

1505. 
Henry Blager, Eau Claire, Wis., L.U. 

1074. 
John E. Lindh, Chicago, 111., L.U. 13. 
Ernest F. Roakey, Oswego, N.Y., L.U. 

743. 
C W. Swathersl, Kissimmee, Fla., L.U. 

132. 
Monte DeForest, St. Paul, Minn., L.U. 

87. 
Al Cressy, Flemington, N.J., L.U. 455. 
Reg. Chipping Babylon, NY., L.U. 1837. 
Martin Carlson, Chicago, 111., L.U. 58. 
John Herring, Columbus, Ohio, L.U. 200. 
George W. Hudson, Staunton, Va., L.U. 

1729. 
Orville C Minka, Toledo, Ohio, L.U. 

248. 
Alan C Meinka, Toledo, Ohio, L.U. 248. 
Ralph Augrutuy, Union Lake, Mich., 

L.U. 337. 
Har. B. Augenting, Tampa, Fla., L.U. 

696. 
Fred A. Belmart, Red Bank, N.J., L.U. 

2250. 
Elmer J. Rowlands, Pittsburgh, Pa., 

L.U. 230. 
George McDonnell, Wilkinsburg, Pa., 

L.U. 430. 
Virgil Cottengin, Cicero, 111., L.U. 1889. 
Edgar Vail, Plainfield, N.J., L.U. 155. 
Frank Holinok, L.U. 366. 
Mr. & Mrs. W. E. Corbin, Aurora, 111., 

L.U. 916. 
Finlay C Allan, Washington, D.C, L.U. 

337. 
Leon W. Greene, St. Paul Minn. 
Gunnar Swankind, Treasure Island, Fla., 

L.U. 33706. 
Karl F. Mayer, Alliance, Ohio, L.U. 

1023. 
W. O. Beard, Indianapolis, Ind., L.U. 

60. 
Charles F. Sturm, Smithtown, L.U. 2765. 
Pete Stransen, Staten Island, N.Y. 
Herbert C Dabnett, Orlando, Fla. 
J. M. Dennis, Amboy, 111., L.U. 790. 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Burns, Fort 

Wayne, Ind. 
Mrs. Alva Burns, Carson City, Mich. 
Carl W. Bridgewater, Bay City, Mich., 

L.U. 116. 
R. L. Niequist D. C, Algonquin, III. 
W. J. Stoops, Congers, N.Y., L.U. 964. 
Clifford Schwarzkopf, Montpelier, Ind., 

L.U. 2047. 
Woodrow W. Robbins, Baltimore, Md., 

L.U. 101. 
Herman D. Matthews, Albuquerque, 

N.M., L.U. 1319. 
Thomas K. Kimmel, Columbus, Ohio, 

L.U. 200. 
on next page) 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAND NEWS 



(Continued from preceding page) 



Fredrick Gilbert, Fort Wayne, Ind., L.U. 

23Z 
Joseph Hack, Yorktown Hghts., N.Y., 

L.U. 2241. 
Mr. & Mrs. Emil Johnson, Manistee, 

Mich., L.U. 100. 
Mr. & Mrs. Jack Meadow, Dunedin, 

Fla.. L.U. 62. 
C. Meadow, Chicago, ID., L.U. 62. 
Mr. & Mrs. Noble A. Snyder, Piqua. 

Ohio. L.U. 2248. 
Jacob S. Pasiatek. Springdale, Pa. 
Leon J. Demers, Chicopee, Mass., L.U. 

390. 
Ragnar Engstrom, Chicago. 111. L.U. 62. 
Robert J. Sibold, Jr., Beachwood, N.J., 

L.U. 2018. 
W'm. Wright, Washington, D.C., L.U. 132. 
Thorwald Nielsen. Riverhead, L.U. 1943. 
Russ Bollinger, Baltimore, Md., L.U. 

101. 



Kalamazoo, 



1397. 
L.U. 



Mass., L.U. 



L.U. 



1128. 
L.U. 



Mr. & Mrs. G. Ebaaune, 

Mich.. L.U. 297. 
Mr. & Mrs. Anders Scherman, Sauaerties 

N.Y., L.U. 1456. 
Fred Payne. Roslyn. N.Y., 
Alfred O. Tilton. Taunton. Mass., 

1035. 
Oscar B. Carlson, Boston, 

51. 
C. T. Brown. Plainfield, 111.. 
R. D. Thompson, Pittsburgh, Pa., 

2274. 
Veris C. Beck, Loganton. Pa., L.U. 2329. 
Charles W. Atkinson, Burlington, NJ., 

L.U. 1489. 
Carl J. Newman, 1040 Charles St., Chi- 
cago, 111.. L.U. 70. 
Fred Blankenship. Marlboro. Md.. L.U. 

132. 
Herman Paulsen, Chicago, 111., L.U. 

1367. 
George Todd, Lexington, Ky., L.U. 1650. 



Laminated W ood Beams Re-used after Fire 



Laminated wood structural beams 
have withstood the extreme heat of a 
gasoline-fed fire in an Arkansas chain- 
saw sales and service store (Photo A) 
that buckled a steel work bench under 
its own weight (Photo B). 

The beams maintained their structural 
soundness through the inferno (Photo C). 
and were used in the roof structure of 
the store recently re-opened by the South- 
west Saw Company at Camden. Arkansas. 

The wood structurals. measuring 40-ft 
x 1-ft x 4-in, were charred to a depth 
about V^ -in by the intense flames which 
swept the shop: the charring action serv- 
ing the beams as a strength-protection 
shield. The laminates were supplied by 
Koppers Company. Inc., Pittsburgh. 

George H. Clippert. president of the 
damaged plant, said the charred beams 
were concealed with a 1" pine lumber 
cover for appearance (Photo D) as the 
40-ft x 40-ft concrete and brick structure 
was restored for operations. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel. Theodore 25 

Belsaw Power Tools 16 

Belsaw Sharp-All Co 23 

Chicago Technical College ... 22 

Craftsman Book Co 39 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 16 

Estwing Manufacturing 20 

Folev Manufacturing 19 

Goldblatt Tool Co 38 

Hydrolevel 38 

Irwin Aucer Bit 17 

Lee. H. D 17 

Locksmithing Institute 16 

North American School of 

Drafting 29 

Riechers. A 39 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

True Temper Corp 31 

Vaughn and Bushnell 23 




H.TOI1E 



' 



LABORS MATERIAL 
"~1 COSTS 

1969 UNIT COSTS 

COMPILED FROM 

I THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

SUPPLIERS 

'208 Pages ONLY $£ 75 

8Vj ■ 11 
NO ADVERTISING In California add 24c tai 





ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 
AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 
TYPICAL SUBCONTRACT 
PRICES INCLUDED 
NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



Send for FREE Building Books Catalog 



CRAFTSMAN BOOK COMPANY OF AMERICA Dept.CI 
12* SO. LA BREA AVE.. LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90036 

I I Please send me the Seventeenth Edition of the 

1 - J NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATOR . . J4.75 

! In California add 24c Sales Tax 

lJ Please send me FREE Building Books Catalog. 

Firm Name 

Vour Name 

Address ^_^__. 

City State . 



10 DAY FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 



Full Length Roof Framer 

A pocket size book with the EX- 
TIRE length of Common-Hip-Valley 
and Jack rafters completely worked 
out for you. The flattest pitch is 'j 
inch rise to 12 inch run . Pitches in- 
crease % inch rise each time until 
the steep pitch of 24" rise to 12" 
run is reached. 

There are 2-100 widths of build- 
ings for each pitch. The smallest 
width is "4 inch and they increase 
U" each time until they cover a 50 
foot buili: 

There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
Hip, Valley & Jack lengths for each 
pitch. 230.400 rafter lengths for 48 
pitches. 

A hip roof is 4S'-9'i" wide. Pitch 
is 7%" rise to 12" run. You can pick 
out the length of Commons. Hips and 
Jacks and the Cuts in ONE MINUTE 
Let us prove it. or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the span and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 i 1944 Copyrights. 



U.S.A. Send $2.50. If C.O.D. pay Post 
Office S3.35. Calif. j'~ c tax. Son. I 
C.O.D. pay Post Office S3.4S. Canadians 
buy only from a Canadian boo!-. 
us for their address. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto. Calif. 94o02 



MARCH, 1969 



39 



OF INTEREST TO OUR INDUSTRIAL LOCALS 



YOUR JOB AND AUTOMATION 



■ Automation is a word industrial 
workers have had to live with for 
a long time. There is scarcely a plant 
in the United States which has not 
been affected to some degree by au- 
tomated machinery. 

Not even the construction indus- 
try has been immune. Fabricated 
roof trusses, pre-hung doors, and a 
wide variety of manufactured com- 
ponents are widely used in construc- 
tion, particularly, house construc- 
tion. 

That automation will continue to 
strike fear in the hearts of workers 
is a foregone conclusion. Actually, 
only 20% of the full potential of 
automation has been achieved so 
far. Eighty per cent is yet to come. 
However, this only pertains to the 
scientific knowledge that now exists. 
Scientific breakthroughs are con- 
stantly being made, with the result 
that the un-utilized 80% continues 
to expand. 

Some idea of the vast explosion 
in knowledge can be gained from 
the fact that 90 percent of the peo- 
ple who have worked on research 
are still alive. In other words, there 
are now nine times more people 
engaged in research than there were 
during the first 175 years of our ex- 
istence. From this research is com- 
ing new ways to do things with auto- 
mated machinery. 

To date, labor has been able to 
take automation in stride. A high 
degree of employment has softened 
the effects of automation. The war 
in Vietnam has also been a contri- 



buting factor to high employment, 
since it required the production of 
vast quantities of war materiel. At 
the same time, it kept several mil- 
lion young men in the Armed Forces 
and out of the labor force. Once the 
war is concluded, these plus factors 
for employment will be eliminated, 
and the struggle with automation will 
become more acute. 

Cybernation is a word less familiar 
to workers than automation. How- 
ever, it is a word which will be 
heard more frequently in the years 
ahead. 

Automation is the process where- 
by machinery is developed to take 
the place of human labor. Regard- 
less of how automated, machinery 
does require operators. 

Cybernetics is the process where- 
by various types of tapes are used to 
guide and direct machines in a 
manner which makes human judg- 
ments unnecessary. 

Simply put, automation creates 
machines which replace manual op- 
erations usually performed by hu- 
man beings. Normally, human be- 
ings are required to make decisions 
as to how the machines should select, 
sort, or join materials. Cybernetics 
provides tapes which make these de- 
cisions automatically. The net result 
is that cybernation eliminates even 
the few men required to keep auto- 
mated machines functioning prop- 
erly. 

The computer is the backbone of 
cybernation. 



To date, automation has had pro- 
found effects on the wood products 
industry. In some areas of the indus- 
try, a high degree of automation 
already has been achieved. In other 
segments, automation is only now 
being introduced. Cybernation is yet 
to come. 

It is the intention of the Research 
Department to take a long, hard 
look at the whole problem of auto- 
mation and the growth of cyberna- 
tion in the wood products field. 
Hopefully, some techniques for deal- 
ing with automation and cyberna- 
tion in forthcoming contract nego- 
tiations will be developed. 

The first step is to know and un- 
derstand what the implications in 
cybernation are for the industry. 

Some industries have developed 
techniques for softening the impact 
of automation. Whenever labor-sav- 
ing devices are introduced, programs 
for retraining workers for other jobs 
are instituted. In other industries, 
funds created by the additional prof- 
its of automation have been placed 
in special funds for the early retire- 
ment of displaced workers. 

In our next article, we will cover 
some of the necessary contract pro- 
visions and will discuss the new set 
of collective bargaining problems 
which result from increased auto- 
mation and cybernation. Meanwhile, 
we suggest you consider ways in 
which automation may affect your 
immediate work situation. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




3SiiAA#*y& 



THE GREAT HERITAGE 

Skilled craftsmanship is a great legacy of past centuries. 

When men in the early stages of society's evolution began to work 
with tools to build shelter, vehicles and the ordinary utensils of the 
household, they saw the imperative need for exacting standards of 
skill and craftsmanship. 

Developing from those early needs were guilds of craftsmen — 
associations of workmen — the forerunners of the trade unions of 
today. Centuries ago journeymen dedicated their services to skill in 
workmanship with an unfailing standard of dependability and 
excellence. 

This early spirit of dedication is a great heritage of the past. 

Times and tools have changed, but the spirit of service through 
skill has not. 

Today, as much as at any time in world history, society must 
count on the dependability, knowledge and conscientious dedication 
of the skilled craftsman. The great heritage of the past is the 
foundation for success and progress in the future. 





New fiberglass hammer 
with exclusive 
Taper-Lock (TM) design — 
won't lose its head 

A brand new ultra strong 
fiberglass handle assembled 
to the head with Stanley's 
exclusive design: Taper-Lock. The head won't fly off. 
Here's why: In assembling conventional hammers, the 
handle is driven up through the bottom of the head. But, 
with the Stanley Taper-Lock, the fiberglass handle is 
driven down through the top, resulting in the 
inseparable bond shown. 

This is, in fact, the ultimate in hammers. 

Includes other great time-tested Stanley features. 
Rim-tempered face — minimizes chipping. Super heat-treated 
head. Extra tough from head to claw. Double beveled 
nail slot — really bites and pulls. Perforated neoprene 
rubber grip. Perfectly balanced and contoured for comfort. 

Stanley Tools, Division of The Stanley Works, 
New Britain, Connecticut 06050. 

Thehamm 




STANLEY 



helps you do things right 

P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest power tools. 



APRIL, 1969 



fT~^/^~\ d } p )i 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 






m 



» 






r /K*. 



■-' 



*fc£i&' 






■ 



M- 






* I 






GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 

Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovttch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(§/A\D2E>SGqU 





VOLUME LXXXIX 



No. 4 



APRIL, 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Paul Bunyan, Master Lumberjack 1 

Loggers Play Games with Ax, Spur, Calk and Choker 4 

How Shall We Elect Future Presidents? 8 

The Tax Collector Is Never Lovable 11 

Home Building Boom To Spark Construction in 70s 12 

Wood Veneer Artist 14 

National Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship and Training Committee 

Winter Meeting 28 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 10 

Editorials 17 

Of Interest to our Industrial Locals 18 

We Congratulate 18 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 19 

Local Union News 21 

Plane Gossip 23 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 24 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 26 

Service to the Brotherhood 31 

In Memoriam 35 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 

POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

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THE COVER 

Probably the most spectacular of 
several monuments to the legendary 
hero, Paul Bunyan, is the one shown 
on our April cover. It greets visitors 
to Trees of Mystery, a tourist attrac- 
tion along US Highway 101, 16 miles 
south of Crescent City, California. 
Privately owned, it stands more than 
30 feet tall at the entrance to a grove 
of redwoods and an outdoor museum 
and garden. Constructed of wood and 
painted in bright colors, it is a big 
man for a big redwood forest. 

Nearby, although not shown in the 
cover picture, is an equally-spectacu- 
lar wooden rendition of Babe, The 
Blue Ox. which served Bunyan so well 
in his many logging exploits. 

Visitors to Trees of Mystery are 
startled and amused to hear them- 
selves greeted by name as they ap- 
proach the mammoth statue. During 
busy summer months young men with 
hidden microphones pick up names 
in the chatter of passing visitors and 
greet the surprised passersby via a 
public address unit housed high in the 
statue. 

Elsewhere in this issue you will find 
articles about Paul Bunyan and about 
the loggers and lumber workers who 
carry on the great traditions of the 
industry. 




PAUL BUNYAN 

Model 
JluMoekj&cJz 




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Photo courtesy of Bemidji Chamber of Commerce. 

Bemidji, Minnesota, claims to be the birthplace of Paul Bunyan, and has erected this 
concrete statuary on the shoreline of Lake Bemidji to substantiate its claim. Some 
writers of Bunyan lore, however, place the big logger's birthplace as somewhere in 
Maine. Nevertheless, Bemidji salutes its hero and his blue ox with a Paul Bunyan 
carnival every June. 



• f St> u ; j|{ 



■ The greatest logger of all times 
was undoubtedly Paul Bunyan, if we 
are to believe the writers of his 
legend. 

Paul could cut down acres of 
timber singlehanded in just a few 
minutes by tying his huge axe to 
the end of a long rope and swinging 
it in circles, and Babe, the blue ox, 
could haul the logs away as fast 
as Paul could cut them. 

Once Paul got 246 million feet 
of timber off 40 acres. That was be- 
cause it was the Pyramid Forty, with 
trees so high that it took a man a 
week to see to the top although sev- 
en men could do it in a day if they 
all looked together. 

Paul's booming voice forced his 
lumberjacks to wear earmuffs the 
year 'round. His lung power was so 
great that he called his logging crews 
together by whistling through a hol- 
low tree. Once he whistled too hard 
and blew down 12 acres of jackpine. 
And, every time Paul sneezed, he 
blew the roof off the bunkhouse. 

Long before Paul Bunyan entered 
our folklore in the early 1900's the 
people, who labored amid axe and 
timber, saws and lumber, created 
him and made him live along with 
them. He represents the heroic ax- 



man, harvesting his way across the 
frontiers of North America. 

American loggers made Paul Bun- 
yan a true hero. They created the 
logging camp myth with its cook- 
house of mountainous size. 

Sourdough Sam, the camp cook, 
made flapjacks on a griddle so big 
it had to be greased by skaters with 
slabs of bacon tied to their feet. And 
once, when a load of pork and beans 
with the ox team pulling it went 
through the ice of Lake Bemidji, 
Sam had huge fires built along the 
shore and boiled the lake to make 
soup. All that winter he fed the log- 
gers bean soup with an ox-tail flavor. 

Paul's blue ox. Babe, had many 
jobs around the logging camp where 
the laundryman hung out the wash 
on his horns, but Babe's biggest job 
was pulling the kinks out of crooked 
logging roads. 

Legend has made Paul Bunyan a 
clever and skilled contractor, whose 
labors might have surpassed those 
of Hercules. 

In order to build Noah's Ark, 
timber and men were necessary. 
After considerable discussion as to 
the price. Paul landed the job on a 
cost-plus basis, since it was the first 
Continued on Page 37 



i F 



ii IS 



» 



*>!*. 



4 





The biff and brawny heritage of Paul 



■ "I can," said the late Jigger Johnson, 
a Maine logging boss, "run faster, jump higher, 
squat lower, move sideways quicker and spit 
farther than any lumberjack in this camp." 
From the days when Captain John Smith, 
of Pocahontas fame, bossed timber-cutting crews 
in the forests around Jamestown, American 
loggers have always prided themselves on being 
very capable men. Admittedly, not many of them 
expressed it as eloquently as Jigger Johnson. 
This innate pride in their brawn and speed was 
the basic reason for the evolution of formal- 
ized sports from the world of logging. Great 
Plains cattle ranching is the only other American 
industry to spawn a sports event: the rodeo. 
Best known of the spectator sports to come 
out of logging is log rolling or biding. It traces 



THE CARPENTER 




In choker setting, %-inch 
steel cables must be drag- 
ged 40 feet and looped 
around waist-high logs. 
Then comes the dash 
back to starting line. 



Max Searles and his 
father, Paul, are experts 
at hand falling. This team, 
balanced on their spring- 
boards and tugging on 
their "misery whip," re- 
call the legendary prowess 
of oldtime loggers. 



unyan lives on in many logger competitions 



Reprinted with permission from The Weyerhaeuser News 



back to the colonial logging era 
in New England when the net- 
work of brooks and streams was 
the main highway for getting logs 
out of the woods. Lumberjacks 
turned rivermen in the spring to 
float, manhandle, and cuss the 
pine and spruce "sticks" all the 
way from upstate Maine to the 
mills of Massachusetts. 

It was risky work, putting a 
premium on cat-like grace among 
the rivermen. This was particular- 
ly true when lumberjacks bound- 
ed along the bark of wet, slippery 
logs cannoning through foaming 
maelstorms such as Fifteen-Mile 
Falls on the Connecticut River 
which reputely took the lives of 
20 or more rivermen over the 
years. 

As the Yankee lumberjacks in- 



vaded the pine woods of the Up- 
per Midwest in the mid-1800's, 
they took these methods and skills 
with them. Their legends of top- 
notch "river pigs" grew in word 
and song like the bunkhouse bal- 
lad, "The Jam at Garry's Rock": 
Come all you brave young shanty 
boys, 
And list' while I relate; 
I'll tell you of a shanty boy 

And his untimely fate. 
This foreman's name was Young 
Munro 
So manly, true and brave; 
He broke the jam at Garry's 
Rock — 
And found a watery grave. 

Despite 10- and 12-hour days 
of dodging death in white water, 
peavy-hooking logs out of shal- 
lows and off rocks, lumberjacks 
still had time and energy at day's 



end to settle disputes about which 
of them was the best man on a 
log. Novelist Walter O'Meara, 
who worked in logging camps at 
the time of the First World War, 
recalls that informal log rolling 
contests were a common pastime 
in the long-shadowed, northern 
twilight along side the wanigan — 
the floating bunkhouse, kitchen 
and dining hall mounted on scows 
— used on the larger rivers. 

First Exhibition 

Log rolling as a formal specta- 
tor sport dates back to 1888 when 
the first recorded public exhibi- 
tion was held. This gives the sport 
almost as much seniority as base- 
ball and American football. 

Aptly termed "boxing with 
your feet," hiding's objective is 
very simple: dunk the other guy. 
Two contestants poise on a lathe- 
turned log and stare fixedly at 
each others feet as they start re- 
volving the log beneath them with 
their sharp-calked shoes. 

The sudden "snub" or re- 
versal of the log's rotation is the 
same thing in birling that the 
riposte is in a fencing match. It 
can catch an opponent off-bal- 
ance and literally catapult him off 
the log with a satisfying splash. 
Sometimes the audience is even 
more satisfied because of two 
simultaneous splashes, since a 
fast-spun log is quite impartial. 

Size or strength of a birler is 
not so important as leopard-like 
timing and response. Women are 
no mean birlers, even though the 
ladies' invasion of this he-man 
sport in the 1 920's caused horror 
and consternation among some 
of the more hairy-chested billing 
enthusiasts ... at least until they 
saw what the new contestants 
looked like in swim suits. 

The first world championship 
log rolling contest was held in 
1 898 in Omaha, Neb., oddly far 
removed from the tall timber and 
fast rivers where the sport evolved. 
Today. Hayward, Wis., once a 
rip-roaring lumberjack communi- 



APRIL, 1969 



ty, is the home of the world 
championship birling classic. 

Four official sizes of logs are used; 
and contestants work their way 
down to the smaller, faster sizes in 
order to break paired deadlocks. 
The big show log is 20 inches in 
diameter. The 17-inch log is called 
the "Big Log," while the tricky 16- 
inch log is nicknamed "Old Dyna- 
mite." The 14-inch log with an 
earned reputation for making swim- 
mers out of many log rollers is 
simply called "The Killer." 

Logs Too Big 

The coastal Pacific Northwest 
saw relatively little river-driving be- 
cause the enormous, 50-ton logs of 
the Cascade country were too big 
to run down most rivers of that 
mountainous terrain. However, the 
Northwest produces both fine all- 
around loggers and top-notch birlers. 
For 17 years straight, the Wickheim 
brothers, Ardiel and Jubiel, of 
Sooke, British Columbia, monopo- 
lized first place honors in the Hay- 
ward birling classic's men's division 



until Phil Scott of Nova Scotia 
broke their string in 1968. 

Birling is only one of the lumber- 
jack sports. Others include both 
vertical and horizontal chopping, 
hand-sawing and tree climbing. 
These are timed events, whereas axe- 
throwing is an accuracy contest. 
Some of the larger logging contests 
in the Northwest include contestants 
jousting with padded poles from 
small boats or logs, choker-setting 
contests (chokers are steel cables 
hitched around logs to retrieve them 
using a power winch), and such 
Machine Age contests as power 
sawing contests and trailer-backing 
— the latter involving huge, logging 
truck trailers. 

Most spectacular of all events is 
climbing. This sport was born in 
the Northwest where spar trees were 
used to rig high, steel cables for 
dragging logs to a central loading 
point. 

Using steel climbing spurs and a 
belt-secured rope circling the tree 
trunk, the climber's job was to "top" 
or cut off the upper portion of the 



tree and then proceed with rigging 
the tackle aloft for "sky-line" or 
"high-lead" yarding of the logs. 

High Hopping 

Portable steel spars largely have 
replaced the need for the risky and 
specialized job of high-topping a 
tree, but it lives on in a highly devel- 
oped contest form. Some of the best 
pros will make a 100-foot climb up 
and down in 35 seconds, a perform- 
ance of speed and grace that makes 
them look like over-sized squirrels 
as they race to the top, then descend 
in long, thrilling drops checked by 
spurs and safety line. 

An old-timer in logging sports 
performance, Bill Cobbs, of Grants 
Pass, Ore., recalls the first of the 
public logging sports shows on the 
Pacific coast at Port Orford, Wash., 
in 1926. Cobbs, a man named Hope 
and a Negro logger, Dave Johnson, 
had times of about two minutes for 
climbing and descending a 125-foot 
spar tree. Modern exhibition climb- 
ers, using specially made climbing 
spurs, now do it in about half that 
time. 



When and Where to 
See Logging Champs 

May 18 (tentative) — Loggers' 
Sports Day, Nanaimo, B. C. 

Sometime in May — Elk Loggers 
Day, Port Alberni, B. C. 

May 24 — Mason Forest Festival 
Loggers Show, Shelton, Wash. 

June 26-27 — Paul Bunyan Days, 
Akeley, Minn. 

July 2-6 — Logger Rodeo, Sedro- 
Woolley, Wash. 

July 3-5 — Timbertenial, Interna- 
tional Falls, Minn. 

July 10-13 — Jaycee Loggers Days, 
Libby, Mont. 

July 18-20 — Jaycee Logging Days 
(state logging championships) 
Park Rapids, Minn. 

July 19-20 — Loggers Celebration, 
Priest River, Id. 

July 31-August 3 — Lumberjack 
Days, Stillwater, Minn. 

August 9-10 — Loggers Jubilee, 
Morton, Wash. 

August 10 — 12th Annual Basque 
Picnic and Festival, Mountain 
Home, Id. 

Mid-August — Tall Timber Days, 
Stratton-Eustis, Me. 

September 6 — Loggers Playday, 
Hoquiam, Wash. 

September 18-21— Fall Fair and 
Lumberjack Days, Orofino, Id. 

If our readers know of others, 
please send them to us for publica- 
tion. 




Even axes and saws have been 
refined and specialized for contest 
use, the axes evolving into heavier 
heads with shorter handles. Hand- 
bucking saws for contests are often 
sharpened specifically for the kind 
of wood to be cut, the log sizes, and 
the preferences of the individual 
contestant. 

The dry-land logging sports, un- 
like birling's Hayward classic, have 
no formal world championship. 
Among the pros, however, the big 
Timber Carnival at Albany, Ore., is 
the one to shoot for. But logging 
rodeos, big and small, are the high- 
light of numerous civic celebrations 
throughout the Northwest. 

Nor do the top performers stop 
there. Washington lumberjack per- 
former Hap Johnson has appeared 
on national TV at Montreal's Expo 
67 under sponsorship of Weyer- 
haeuser Company. The Wickheim 
brothers have log rolled in many 
shows throughout North America 
and at the Tokyo Trade Fair as 
Canada's representatives. Australia 
and New Zealand have furnished 



some formidable competitors at 
some of the bigger North American 
logging contests. Kelly Stanley, 
Centralia, Wash., performer, has run 
his climbing spurs up spars at three 
world's fairs and in Australia, New 
Zealand and England. Surprisingly, 
two Japanese performers took top 
honors in the trick and fancy divi- 
sion of the log rolling championships 
in Hayward three years ago. 

Growing Audience 

Finley Hayes, editor of the North- 
west-circulated "Loggers World" 
and a frequent emcee at logging 
carnivals, points out that these sports 
are growing in audience attraction 
year by year and definitely are not 
a slow-dying anachronism. 

And well they might grow, rep- 
resenting as they do the epitome of 
physical fortitude plus skill that are 
the hallmarks of the archetypical 
American lumberjack. If anything, 
the advent of the Age of the Auto- 
mated Push-button may make even 
more fascinating the spectacle of 
rugged, skillful men who make the 
chips fly with their own brawn. ■ 




■ :. ~ 



■ Paul Searles of Toutle Lake, Wash., (opposite page) 
drives his razor-sharp ax into a 14-inch lop in the 
chopping contest. Champions like Paul can complete 
the cut in less than half a minute. 

■ The 36-inch slice, or "lily pad," is the target of the 
competition ax thrower (above). He stands at a dis- 
tance of 20 feet and hurls his 2Vi pound double-bitted 
ax at the bull's eye. 

■ In the July Loggers' Jubilee at Morton, Wash., Patty 
Reopelle gracefully dumped her father, Mike, in the 
annual birling competition (far right). 

■ Gene Bingaman, right, has spent nearly 40 years as 
a logger. 








How Shall We Elect 
Future US Presidents? 




THREE PLANS ARE UNDER CONSIDERATION 



■ Ever since the last national elec- 
tion in the United States there has 
been a good deal of agitation for an 
overhaul of the procedures by which 
the President is elected. 

Had President Nixon lost a few 
more states in November, the elec- 
tion of the President would have 
been thrown into the House of Rep- 
resentatives. Since the Constitution 
is somewhat vague as to the proce- 
dures which would prevail under 
such circumstances, there could 
have developed a real politicial crisis 
of major proportions. Consequently, 
there is growing demand for change 
in the Electoral College system. 

Under the existing system, each 
state is allocated one electoral vote 
for each Congressman and Senator 
serving from that state. The candi- 
date who captures the largest popu- 
lar vote in the state receives all the 
electorial votes of that state. The 
Electoral College then proceeds to 
elect the President in an election 



which is a mere formality. This sys- 
tem has been in effect since the 
Constitution was adopted. 

There are many weaknesses in- 
herent in the system. The first is 
that a candidate with a minority of 
popular votes can be elected Presi- 
dent. In fact, three Presidents were 
elected with a minority of the popu- 
lar vote. A system which allows a 
minority candidate to gain office 
contains some undemocratic over- 
tones. 

Another weakness of the present 
procedure is that it does not bind 
Presidential electors to vote for the 
candidate they represented on the 
ballot. In the last election, one 
gentleman who was carried on the 
ballot as a Nixon elector actually 
voted for Wallace in the Electoral 
College. Therefore, in extreme cir- 
cumstances, it is possible that the 
Electoral College could actually 
thwart the will of the people who 



elected them. Conceivably, it is also 
possible to elect a President and 
Vice President from different par- 
ties. 

The system also fails to take into 
account population changes in the 
states between national 10-year cen- 
suses. Another questionable feature 
stems from the fact that each state, 
regardless of population size, gets at 
least three electoral votes, which 
means that an electoral vote from a 
very populous state carries less 
weight per capita than an electoral 
vote from a state with a very small 
population. 

How to amend the election pro- 
cedures to eliminate these weak- 
nesses has been a subject of study 
by many people for a great many 
years. Currently, there are three 
plans being pushed in Congress. 
These plans differ widely, and a 
summary of them is herewith pre- 
sented: 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



DISTRICT PLAN 



A "district" plan seems to have 
some support from the conservative 
elements in Congress. Under this 
plan, the Electoral College would be 
preserved, but the electors would 
have to be chosen by districts in the 
same manner as the Representatives 
and Senators. The lines for each 
district would be set up by the state 
legislature. 

The Presidential candidate with 
a plurality in each electoral district 
would receive the vote of the elector 
from that district. In addition, the 
candidate who received a state-wide 
plurality would receive the two elec- 
toral votes assigned to the state to 
account for the two Senate seats. 



As in the present system, the 
candidate receiving a majority of the 
total electoral vote would become 
President. In the event, however, 
that no candidate received a major- 
ity of the total electoral vote, the 
new Senators and Representatives 
sitting jointly would choose the Pres- 
ident from among the three candi- 
dates receiving the highest number 
of electoral votes. 

There are some serious objections 
to the District Plan. Under this sys- 
tem it would still be possible for a 
candidate to lose the popular vote 
but win the Presidency. 

Since the various state legislatures 
would draw up the districts from 



which the electors would be elected, 
it is possible that political whims 
might chop the state up into elec- 
toral districts which differed from 
Congressional districts. This could 
lead to all sorts of political jockey- 
ing and shenanigans to favor the 
candidates representing the Party 
controlling the state legislature. 

Splinter parties would be encour- 
aged because they could throw a 
monkey wrench into the elections by 
concentrating their efforts in a few 
districts. The plan would also in- 
crease the cost of Presidential cam- 
paigns by requiring special effort in 
many districts. 



■ PROPORTIONAL PLAN 

A second plan advanced for elec- 
tion reform is a "proportional" plan. 
Under this system the Electoral Col- 
lege would be eliminated. However, 
each state would still retain elec- 
toral votes equal to its Representa- 
tives in Congress. 

The state's electoral votes would 
be divided in direct proportion to the 
popular vote. For example, if a state 
had 10 electoral votes and Candi- 
date A received 55% of the popular 
vote and Candidate B received 45%, 
5.5 electoral votes would go to 
Candidate A and 4.5 would go to 



Candidate B. The candidate with 
the greatest number of electoral 
votes would be elected President; 
provided, however, that he received 
a certain minimum percentage (say 
40%) of the electoral vote. 

If no candidate received a suffi- 
cient number of electoral votes to 
carry the election, the election would 
be shifted to the Congress. The two 
Houses, sitting jointly, with each 
Senator and Representative voting 
as an individual, would choose the 
President from one of the two candi- 
dates receiving the highest number 



of popular votes. A majority of the 
total votes of both Houses would 
be necessary for a candidate to be 
elected. The Vice President would 
be elected at the same time and in 
the same manner. 

There are objections to this plan, 
too. Under this plan, it would also 
be possible for a minority candidate 
to be elected President. The Pro- 
portional Plan would encourage the 
splintering of political parties, even 
while it provided no positive insur- 
ance that the popular will of the 
people would prevail. 



■ POPULAR-VOTE PLAN 

The third and most popular plan 
is the election of the President and 
Vice President by popular vote. Un- 
der this plan, the Electoral College 
would be eliminated and there would 
be no such thing as electoral votes. 
Voters would vote directly for the 
candidates of their choice. In order 
to be elected, a candidate would 
have to receive a plurality of at least 
40% of the popular vote. If no can- 
didate received such a minimum, 
there would be a runoff election be- 
tween the two top candidates on a 
date to be decided by Congress. 

Those who are opposed to the di- 
rect election of the President claim 
that such a system would inevitably 
lead to the emergence of national 



laws governing voters' qualifications. 
They further insist that the princi- 
ples of federalism, upon which the 
nation was founded, would be un- 
dercut. 

The whole elective process is a 
very complicated one and very diffi- 
cult to explain in a short article. 
However, the fears which existed 
last November that the election of 
the President might be thrown into 
the House of Representatives created 
a great deal of agitation for reform 
in our election laws. Since a Con- 
stitutional amendment would be re- 
quired to change the existing proce- 
dures, it is doubtful if any changes 
will be made in short order. Two- 



thirds of the states must ratify a 
Constitutional amendment, and such 
a procedure takes a good deal of 
time and political maneuvering. 

From all indications, a third party 
movement is here to stay. The fol- 
lowers of George Wallace have orga- 
nized a permanent party and ap- 
parently intend to actively partici- 
pate in national elections from here 
on in. 

Since the existing Constitutional 
procedures for choosing a President 
when no candidate receives a ma- 
jority of the electoral votes are so 
ambiguous and indefinite, the exist- 
ence of a third party adds urgency 
to the clamor for reform. 



APRIL, 1969 




ROUNDUP 



SMOKE IS GETTING THICKER in the wake of the Federal Communica 
announced ban of cigarette advertising on radio and TV. Cong 
are "choosing sides" for the upcoming debate to renew a 1965 
prohibit any such ban — due to expire in July. Should FCC fai 
advertising squeeze, the Federal Trade Commission is ready to 
to carry more prominent health warnings on all commercials, 
lobbyists on both sides are mustering strength and statistics 
when it takes up discussion on cigarette advertising, a subje 
"too hot to handle." 



tions Commission's 
ressmen and senators 
law — which would 
1 to make good on its 

force tobacco firms 
Citizens groups and 

to sway the Congress 
ct which it may find 



CREDIT UNION MEMBERS saved and borrowed record amounts during 1968, reports the 
Bureau of Federal Credit Unions. 

The 23,480 credit unions throughout the country, both federally and state 
chartered, showed loan increases of $1.3 billion and member savings increases 
of $1.2 billion, surpassing previous records set in 1965, said J. Deane Gannon, 
bureau director. 



THE BOOM IS ON in tiny Taiwan, the haven for Nationalist Chinese. Once reliant 
on a $100-million-a-year subsidy from the U.S., this little island half the size 
of South Carolina is now a big producer of electronics components, plastics, 
paper, cement, textiles and canned goods. The frenzied economic activity has 
spurred a 13% rise in Taiwan's gross national product. A large percentage of the 
island's young people are in school, which makes possible a 90% literacy rate; 
and it is one of the healthiest and best fed of all Asian peoples. Yet Chiang 
Kai-shek's hope for eventual Chinese reunification continues; until then, the 
people build a great "New China" on tiny Taiwan. 



OWNER-OPERATORS— A recent National Labor Relations Board ruling, upholding 
Teamster Local 36, San Diego, Calif., will have an impact on union contracts in 
the construction industry. 

The Board held, in effect, that the local was within its rights in requiring 
owner-operators who own and drive their own equipment on construction jobs to be 
cleared through the union hiring hall. 



DIRECT ELECTION— The AFL-CIO urged Congress to initiate a constitutional amend- 
ment providing for election of the President by popular vote rather than to 
seek a mere "patchwork" change in the present Electoral College system. 
Federation Pres. George Meany presented, labor's views to the House Judiciary 
Committee which is considering a smorgasbord of proposals for electoral reform. 



FEDERAL SCHOOL AID-Federal aid to educati 
from total collapse and must be continued 
Congress. Walter G. Davis, the federatio 
city school systems "face disaster" if Co 
gram which has helped elementary and seco 
needs of children from the poorest famili 
dary Education Act was launched four year 
urged the House Education & Labor Committ 



on has saved America's school system 

and expanded, the AFL-CIO told 
n's education director, warned that 
ngress abandons the federal grant pro- 
ndary schools meet the educational 
es. The landmark Elementary & Secon- 
s ago by the 89th Congress, and Davis 
ee to extend it another five years. 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



Distressed Taxpayers, Take Heart; 
Conditions Never Were Very Good. 

The Tax Collector 
Is Never Lovable 





■ Taxpayers who complain of be- 
ing "scalped" each April 15 might 
find comfort in N. P. Langford's 
woes. 

"I ran the risk of losing my scalp 
on two different occasions," Lang- 
ford, Montana's first federal tax col- 
lector, wrote in 1866. Riding horse- 
back through Indian territory to call 
on mining camps, he learned that 
tax-exempt Indians displayed even 
more hostility than the miners. 

Long before Langford and other 
agents collected th; Nation's first 
income tax — levied to finance the 
Civil War — taxation ranked among 
man's most maligned inventions, the 
National Geographic Society says. 

Overthrew Rulers 

Citizens of Lagash, an important 
city-state of ancient Sumer, over- 
threw their rulers 36 centuries ago 
in favor of a new king who promised 
to reduce taxes and dismiss the tax 
agents. 

But a thousand years later, con- 
ditions apparently hadn't improved 
very much in Sumer. A contempor- 
ary cuneiform writer warned on a 
clay tablet: "You can have a lord, 
you can have a king, but the man to 



fear is the tax collector." 

The degree of prying by tax col- 
lectors in medieval England shocked 
some citizens. One agent's activities 
were described this way: 

"There was not a single hide 
(land unit) nor yard of land nor 
even — it is a shame to tell though 
it seemed no shame to do — an ox, 
nor a cow, nor a swine that was left 
that was not set down in his writing." 

Attitudes have changed little over 
the centuries. Even Woodrow Wil- 
son, who advocated the first modern 
graduated income tax law. admitted: 
"The tax collector is never esteemed 
as a lovable man. His methods are 
too blunt, and his power too ob- 
noxious." 

The 1913 tax measure provided 
for a scale that seems quaint by to- 
day's standards. Rates began at one 
percent and reached a six percent 
maximum on incomes exceeding 
$500,000. Even after a few years' 
trial, total collections fell short of 
$200,000,000 annually. 

By comparison, more than 70,- 
000.000 individual federal tax re- 
turns will be filed in 1969, repre- 
senting total accumulated receipts in 



excess of $80,000,000,000. 
Shirts and Teeth 

In 1969, as usual, some returns 
will be accompanied by shirts and 
false teeth, submitted by disgruntled 
citizens. 

Most taxpayers will hear nothing 
more from the Internal Revenue 
Service until their 1970 returns are 
due. Some delighted citizens will re- 
ceive refund checks. Others will be 
distressed to learn they owe more 
money than they figured. 

One delinquent taxpayer defended 
his calculations in a letter to the Dis- 
trict Director. Against Internal 
Revenue's computers, he cited the 
highest authority, his wife. 

"I have tried every combination 
of figures I can think of and cannot 
discover how your computer ar- 
rived at a tax of $772. 1 5." he wrote. 

"Because I have great respect for 
computers. I am enclosing a schedule 
which indicates that by my compu- 
tations the tax would be $528.61, 
and I have had my wife check my 
figures. You can't go higher than 
wives." 

The outcome of the dispute has 
not been recorded. 



APRIL, 1969 



11 



CHANGE IN MAJOR TYPES 
OF CONSTRUCTION 

(per cent change in 
constant dollars-1960 to 1967) 




-10 +10 +20 +30 +40 +50% 



Home Building Boom to Spark 
Construction in the Seventies 

TOTAL CONSTRUCTION EXPECTED TO KEEP PACE 



■ Housing will spark construction 
growth in the 1970's, according to 
the 1980 F. W. Dodge Construction 
Market Outlook, a special report 
released recently by the Economics 
Department of McGraw-Hill Infor- 
mation Systems Company. 

Construction was the step-child of 
a prosperous economy during much 
of the Sixties. While total national 
output was growing at an annual 
average rate of 4.7%, exclusive of 
price changes, the value of constru- 
tion put in place increased at a rate 
of only 2.3%. 

Looking to 1980, total construc- 
tion is again expected to keep pace 
with overall economic growth. With 
an average annual growth of about 
4.3 per cent, the demand for new 
construction should rise to over $ 130 
billion by 1980 (in 1967 dollars). 
If inflationary trends follow ex- 
pected patterns, this value will 
climb to almost $200 billion, ac- 
cording to the Dodge economist. 



According to the special F. W. 
Dodge report, these developments 
in the nation's construction activity 
are anticipated during the next dec- 
ade (all figures in 1967 dollars): 

• BUSINESS demand for build- 
ing is expected to increase at a 3.3 
per cent annual rate to $32.2 billion. 
Substantial gains in utilities and 
store building will offset more 
modest growth in industrial and 
office construction. 

• HOUSING demand is expected 
to grow at a 5.4 per cent annual 
rate to $47.0 billion. A sharp up- 
turn in the rate of family formations 
and increased government spending 
for programs aimed at eliminating 
slums and improving environmental 
conditions in the nation's cities will 
spark the anticipated boom in resi- 
dential building. 

• INSTITUTIONAL building re- 
quirements are expected to increase 



to $11.8 billion, a modest 0.6 per 
cent annual growth rate. Enrollment 
trends, reflecting the drop in the 
birth rate since the late 1950's, sug- 
gest a lessened demand for new edu- 
cational building. Hospital construc- 
tion should continue to increase in 
response to changing needs. 

• COMMUNITY facilities con- 
struction, responding to larger gov- 
ernment domestic expenditures and 
the increasing demand for better 
roads and other public facilities, 
should increase at a 5.3 per cent 
annual rate to $40.5 billion. 

The growth rates projected for 
the Seventies in the 7950 F. W. 
Dodge Construction Market Out- 
look represent realistic trends rather 
than idealistic goals, taking into con- 
sideration limitations in the supply 
of labor, materials and credit. They 
indicate a need for increased orga- 
nizing in the home — construction by 
all building and construction trades. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



• BUSINESS DEMAND 

Most business firms undertake 
new construction projects to satisfy 
one of three basic needs: provide 
additional capacity to handle ex- 
panded volume of business; update 
facilities for more efficient use; or 
replace buildings that have been 
destroyed, made obsolete or con- 
verted into other uses. All three 
factors will enter into the growth of 
the various types of business con- 
struction in the Seventies. 

Manufacturing Buildings and 
Utilities: In order to satisfy the pro- 
jected demands for goods, indus- 
trial production will have to jump 
more than 40 per cent by 1975 and 
almost 80 per cent by 1980. Ca- 
pacity won't have to grow quite that 
much, since some excess exists right 
now, and more efficient production 
methods will cut down on the 
amount of plant and equipment 
needed to produce a unit of output. 
Replacement needs and anticipated 
expansion should stimulate a 45 per 
cent growth in construction of in- 
dustrial buildings between the un- 
usually high level of 1967 and 1980. 
Outlays for utilities are expected to 
rise 75 per cent, as they catch up 
with business and consumer needs, 
and as conversion to nuclear gener- 
ating facilities is accelerated. 

Stores and Warehouses: Total 
selling space in retail stores has in- 
creased at only about two-thirds the 
rate of gain in sales in recent years. 
With total retail outlays expected to 
increase at a 4.2 per cent annual 
rate through 1980, construction of 
new stores and warehouses should 
rise about 55 per cent between 1967 
and 1980. 

Offices: Construction of new of- 
fice space currently is riding the 
crest of a three-year wave of ex- 
pansion. Although the rapid in- 
crease in white collar workers in 
recent years has created some back- 
log in demand, it is doubtful that 
the current rate of increase can be 
maintained. 

Since present construction activ- 
ity exceeds new demand and the 
growth of office employment is ex- 
pected to slow down, spending for 
new office buildings in 1980 is ex- 
pected to top the 1967 level by only 
25 per cent. ■ 




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APRIL, 1969 



13 



Wood Veneer Artist 




■ Retirement didn't bring idleness to 
Endur M. Berg, 72-year-old member 
of Local 277, Philadelphia, Pa. In- 
stead, it gave him an opportunity to 
pursue a hobby of wood-veneer pic- 
ture making, which had been tantaliz- 
ing him since the depression of the 
1930s. 

Now — only six years after he took 
up his hobby in earnest — he is being 
hailed as a specialty artist and cur- 
rently has an exhibition of his work 
in the Evening Bulletin Building in 
Philadelphia. 

Born in Finland, Berg came to the 
United States in 1913, where he be- 
gan work as a carpenter's apprentice. 
Before his retirement in 1963, he was 
an excellent carpenter and cabinet- 
maker. He had considered working 
with veneer pictures many years ago, 
but money was scarce and materials 
were expensive. 

Upon his retirement, both time and 
money were more abundant, and he 
quickly set up a workshop. 

Most of Berg's creations take well 
over 100 hours for planning, acquir- 
ing materials, inlaying the wood, and, 
in some cases, making frames. He 
uses plywood or Novoply for the base 

Continued on page 34 





Berg beside a portion of his recent Philadelphia exhibit. 



.... .. . , . , 




An East Coast barn in winter. 



A church near the shore. 



14 



A lighthouse and countryside. 
THE CARPENTER 



OF INTEREST TO OUR INDUSTRIAL LOCA 




Advance-Notice Clauses and Automation 



From the Research Department 



■ In last month's issue we tried to 
spell out briefly some of the implica- 
tions for industrial workers involved in 
automation, cybernation, and the tech- 
nological revolution. 

Briefly put, no plant or industry or 
industrial workers can feel immune. 
The threat of job obsolescence brought 
on by new machinery hangs over the 
head of every worker who does a re- 
petitive job. 

How can unions meet the challenge 
of the technological revolution? There 
is no easy answer. Various unions have 
used various approaches to protect the 
jobs and paychecks of the members 
they represent. 

For example, the Longshoremen ne- 
gotiated a fund into which employers 
introducing labor-saving machinery 
pay a fixed percentage of the savings 
achieved by automated machinery. 
This fund is used to provide sizable 
severance pay or early retirement 
benefits to members displaced by the 
machines. 

Other unions have worked out ar- 
rangements whereby existing employ- 
ees are kept on the job until they die 
or reach retirement age. The com- 
pany simply keeps them on the job 
but does not hire any new employees 
and thereby gradually reduces the 
work force. 

Since no workers can be sure that 
automation will not involve all or part 
of the plant at some future date, it is 



wise for unions to make preparations 
for that day. 

As a first step, all industrial unions 
should negotiate into their contracts an 
"advanced-notice" clause. What such 
a clause does is establish the fact that 
the introduction of labor-saving ma- 
chinery is a negotiable item. 

In other words, such a clause makes 
it impossible for an employer to say 
on a given Monday morning, "We are 
starting to automate this plant, and we 
are going to have to lay off some work- 
ers and relocate others at our discre- 
tion." Instead, the employer will have 
to approach the union and say, "It is 
necessary for us to automate this plant 
to meet our competition. This is going 
to require some readjustment on the 
part of our work force, so let us get 
our heads together to see how we 
can make the change with the least 
possible disruption for everyone." 

It may not be easy to negotiate an 
advance-notice clause in all situations, 
since many employers will insist that 
such a clause is an infringement on 
something they call "management pre- 
rogative." However, this should not 
dissuade local unions from insisting on 
such clauses in their agreements. 

Where there is no advance-notice 
clause in the agreement, many employ- 
ers have found that they lost many of 
their best employees as soon as they 
announced that automation was com- 
ing. In the long run, this has cost many 



firms much more than negotiation of 
a pre-automation program would have 
cost. This can be pointed out to em- 
ployers who resist an advance notice 
clause. 

With such a clause there are many 
avenues open for negotiating pro- 
grams to soften the initial blow of au- 
tomation. The union and management 
can jointly analyze the problems which 
will hit the work force. They can plan 
retraining programs for men whose 
jobs will be displaced so they can 
move over to other jobs in the auto- 
mated plant. They can negotiate fair 
and reasonable severance pay for men 
who cannot be retrained. They can 
study the pension plan to find ways of 
making early retirement possible for 
workers close to retirement age. 

The main point is that the disrupt- 
ing effects of automation can be soft- 
ened by proper planning between labor 
and management. 

Management will have adequate 
funds to initiate these programs be- 
cause the new equipment will dras- 
tically reduce labor costs. Some of 
these savings could and should be 
channeled into programs for taking 
care of workers displaced by the ma- 
chines. Therefore, we urge that all 
industrial local unions promptly ne- 
gotiate advance-notice clauses in their 
next agreements. 

In the next issue we will publish a 
typical advance-notice clause or two to 
indicate proper wording. ■ 




THE 1969 DRIVE IS ON 

CLIC, the Carpenters' Legisla- 
tive Improvement Committee, is now 
raising funds to continue its vital 
work on behalf of Brotherhood-sup- 
ported legislation and representation. 
Make your membership contribution 
NOW! 




APRIL, 1969 



15 




The Joseph Conrad 



The Charles W. Morgan 



We're Lashed to the Masthead by Our Readers 



■ Let it never be said that a carpenter 
knows only his trade. Scores — maybe 
hundreds — of carpenters, millwrights, and 
mill-cabinet men know a lot about ships, 
and we have letters to prove it. We even 
have two letters from postal clerks who 
happened to scan our magazine as it went 
through the post offices last month. 

The March cover of The Carpenter 
displayed a color picture of the vessel 
shown at left above and identified it on 
the contents page as The Charles W. 
Morgan, historic old sailing ship at Mys- 
tic, Connecticut. Actually, the vessel is 
The Joseph Conrad. The picture at right 
above is The Charles W. Morgan, also at 
Mystic, Connecticut. See the difference? 

"The Charles W. Morgan has square 
holes in the bow," states Leonard H. 
Hunter of Local 1302, New London, 
Conn. "I called Joseph Hermann, who I 
know very well and who is superintend- 
ent of all ship repairs and maintenance 
work at Mystic Seaport, and he said that 
this picture is not the Morgan . . . The 
Morgan is not floating in water. It is set 
on a concrete base . . ." 

John McNamara. Jr., of Local 359, 
Philadelphia, Pa., tells us that The Mor- 
gan is actually located "at Morgan's 
Wharf, just north of where your cover 
picture was taken." He visited Mystic two 
years ago. 

Fred Yehle of Local 337, Detroit, 
Mich., tells us that The Joseph Conrad 
is not wood at all, but Swedish iron, and 
it was built in Copenhagen in 1882 and 
served as a training ship for the Danish 
merchant marine. 

Raymond J. Kaiser, also of Detroit, 
says he builds model ships as a hobby 
and, in fact, has built a model of The 
Charles W. Morgan. He corrects us, too. 

A member of Local 351, Northamp- 
ton, Mass., showed his March Carpenter 
to Francis McQuillan, a member of Elec- 
trical Workers Local 710, who was a 



frequent visitor to The Morgan when it 
was berthed at the estate of Col. E.H.R. 
Green's Round Hill, South Dartmouth, 
Mass. McQuillan noted the error. 

Barbara Lange, a member of Girl 
Scout Troop 121, Tuckahoe, N.Y., tells us 
she spent approximately a week aboard 
The Joseph Conrad, "and I know for a 
fact that this is the ship which appears 
on your cover." 

Esther Danielson of Massapequa, N.Y., 
has been to Mystic several times and 
noted the error. 

Phernam T. Smith of Local 1641, 
Naples, Fla., points out that The Morgan 
is the last of the wooden whaling ships. 

Erik Sorensen of Local 181, Chicago, 
tells us that The Conrad was originally 
called The Geary Stage, and the name 
was changed when it was sold to the 
United States. It was once commanded 
by Capt. Alan Villiers on a National 
Geographic Society expedition. 

John Beetle Baumann of Local 1416, 
New Bedford. Mass., knows whereof he 
speaks when he tells us of The Morgan: 

"As a young man employed at the 
Hillman Shipyard, my Great-grandfather, 
James Beetle, built the original whale 
boats for The Morgan," Baumann writes. 
"In 1924, at the age of 66 years, my 
grandfather, Charles D. Beetle, built the 
last whale boat for The Morgan. It was 
a duplication built on the frame his 
father made long before he was born. As 
years went on and the size of whale 
boats increased, cheek pieces were added 
on to widen the beam. As a boy, I 
watched my father build the Beetle Whale 
Boat for the museum at Newport News, 
Va. . ." 

Bainbridge Crist of Washington, D.C., 
who undoubtedly knows his ships, listed 
five major differences between the two 
vessels, and we thank him and all the 
other correspondents who made us real- 
ize what landlubbers we are. ■ 



Are Lefties Best 
On Form Work? 

"I like to have a left-handed buddy on 
form work," says Floyd L. Fisher of Lo- 
cal 60, Indianapolis, Ind., in a recent 
letter to The Carpenter. 

He was referring to our article, "South- 
paws," in the February issue, in which 
we reported the assets and the liabilities 
of left-handed people. 

Fisher says he prefers lefties working 
with him on forms because they can read 
the tapes and rules better. 

"Using a tape with pencil in right hand, 
the figures must be read upside down," 
he points out. "No doubt there are many 
mistakes made, like a 6 for a 9 or a 45 
for a 54. I have a feeling that factories 
do make them or could easily, but no 
hardware stores want to take a chance on 
something which might not sell. 

"If there was an ad in The Carpenter 
for a 16-foot rule reading from right to 
left, I would be the first to send in an 
order. Can't some responsible person do 
something about this for us frustrated 
carpenters?" 

Any comment from our readers? 

Truth-in-Lending 
Rules Are Issued 

U.S. merchants and money-lenders 
have been told by the Federal govern- 
ment exactly what information must be 
disclosed to credit customers and bor- 
rowers after luly 1, when the federal 
truth-in-lending law takes effect. 

The law, strongly supported by the 
AFL-CIO during an eight-year campaign 
for passage, allowed more than a year 
of preparation to reform the nation's 
consumer credit structure. 

It assigned to the Board of Governors 
of the Federal Reserve System the task 
of translating the legislative language 
into specific regulations on credit and 
interest charge disclosure. 

The board has completed its regulations 
which will apply to "banks, savings and 
loan associations, department stores, 
credit card issuers, credit unions, auto- 
mobile dealers, consumer finance com- 
panies, residential mortgage brokers, 
craftsmen such as plumbers and electric- 
ians, doctors, dentists, hospitals and any 
other individuals or groups which extend 
or arrange for consumer credit." 

Neither the law nor the regulations 
set any ceiling on interest rates or finance 
charges. 

The intent is to disclose to customers 
or borrowers before a deal is closed or 
a sale made exactly what the credit or 
interest charge may be in terms of true 
annual interest rates. This would en- 
able consumers to "shop for credit" by 
comparing the credit costs of one store, 
bank, or loan company with that of an- 
other. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 





EDITORIALS 



'•'■' Can New Homestead Ret Relieve Our Crowded Cities? 



A group calling itself the Committee for National 
Land Development Policy has come up with a bold 
proposal for relieving our unmanageable, slum-ridden 
cities. It's a proposal which deserves the serious con- 
sideration of the Nixon Administration and of the Con- 
gress. 

Basically, the Committee would solve the urban 
crisis through the establishment of new communities. 
It suggests a special commission to earmark 50 or 
more new city sites far removed from the environ of 
present large cities, each to eventually accommodate 
up to one million inhabitants. 

"Under the plan we propose," a Committee spokes- 
man states," the Federal government would designate 
the new city sites in cooperation with development 
agencies of the 50 individual states. 

"Industry would acquire title to the land on which 
it builds plants. Individuals and developers would 
acquire title to the land on which they build houses. 
The new cities would be favored with tax incentives, 
government contracts. Federal and state building pro- 
grams." 

The result would be that industry and people would 
be attracted to the new cities instead of contributing 



to the further crowding, pollution and transportation 
problems of existing metropolitan areas. Industrialists 
today often seek new factory sites as far as possible 
from the chaotic problems of the large cities. The 
Committee plan would remove this hit-and-miss, 
fringe development situation. 

The Committee points out that the Federal govern- 
ment still owns land in many areas of the country which 
could be developed under such a plan, thereby avoid- 
ing some of the costs of land acquisition. 

What is needed, says the Committee for a National 
Land Development Policy is an Industrial Homestead 
Act as bold as the Homestead Act of the 19th Cen- 
tury, which opened the West to settlers and expanded 
the nation to the Pacific. 

Why try to shore up so many of our existing cities 
with piecemeal rehabilitation? Instead, give today's 
cities a breathing spell, so they may rebuild for the 
21st Century. 

Perhaps the proposal — as visionary as it is — would 
be one answer to an economy which may suffer set- 
backs when the Vietnam War is ended. The Commit- 
tee's recommendation deserves serious study. 



Forces ot Reaction Oppose the Nation s Farm Workers 



This spring in the lush valleys of Central California, 
where much of the nation's table grapes are grown, 
an organization of farm workers is fighting desperately 
for its place in the sun. 

The grape workers are lead by a small and dynamic 
man of Mexican extraction named Cesar Chavez and 
a band of dedicated trade unionists, including some 
of the best organizing talent of the AFL-CIO. 

Ranked against them is a group of well-financed 
and reactionary grape growers who are now trying 
to undermine the workers by calling them communist, 
socialist, and anarchist. Through the efforts of various 
conservatives, the growers have lined up as allies the 
John Birch Society and similar groups, including a 
company union, for a campaign of intimidation. 

We urge our members to weigh carefully what they 



read and hear about the grape boycott now being con- 
ducted by the California farm workers. Though their 
cause may attract members of the so-called New Left 
and other questionable adherents, their goals are right 
and the leaders are honest, dedicated trade unionists. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany told Chavez 
and his followers, "We are with you. and we are going 
to stay with you until you have a real union." 

In response, Chavez told the l l >(->7 AFL-CIO Con- 
vention: "Your support helps us to tell every agricul- 
tural employer in this country, throughout our land 
and in every state . . . that we are not by ourselves and 
that they cannot expect to break us . . . In return, we 
pledge to you very solemnly that we will continue the 
Struggle to build a union of farm workers in America." 



APRIL, 1969 



17 



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. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices., have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "stood 
out from the crowd." "Phis month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



SKATING CHAMP— The young fellow smil- 
ing proudly in the accompanying picture 
is Georgie Podolsky, son of Eugene 
Podolsky, a member of Local 171, 
Youngstown, Ohio. Though he is only 
7 years old and has been roller skating 
for only 2Vi years, Georgie is 1967 and 
1968 Ohio State Amateur Roller Skating 
Champion, Juvenile B Boys Singles; Great 
Lakes Regional Singles Champion in his 
division; and, last August, he won third 
place in the Juvenile B Boys Single 
Division of the U.S. Singles Roller Skat- 
ing Championships. Georgie was one of 
2,500 contestants in the competition. 

Last December his proud father took 
him to Washington for a meeting with 
Vice President Hubert Humphrey, at 
which time father and son visited the 
Brotherhood headquarters. 

GOVERNMENT ROLE-Stanley S. Yanagi, 
financial secretary and business repre- 
sentative of Local 745, Honolulu, has 
been appointed by Hawaii Gov. John A. 
Burns to the State Advisory Commission 
on Manpower and Full Employment. 





HONORED IRISH— When the United Irish Counties, a fraternal group, assembled last 
January for their annual grand ball, members of the Brotherhood in Flushing, N.Y., 
and vicinity played key roles. Shown above are: Honorary Ball Chairman John J. 
O'Connor, president and business representative of Local 608; Guest of Honor 
Thomas W. Tobin, secretary-treasurer of the Building and Construction Trades 
Council of Greater New York; Honorary Chairman Jack McCarthy, business manager 
of Local 18A; and United Irish Counties General Chairman Michael J. Keene, also 
of Local 608. 



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18 



THE CARPENTER 



1 4r I Canadian Report 



Need for Planning 
To Create New Jobs 

The Canadian Labor Congress put 
strong emphasis on the need for plan- 
ning to create jobs in its annual pres- 
entation to the federal government. 

The brief was well-received by 
Prime Minister Trudeau and his cabi- 
net as it was summarized by CLC 
President Donald MacDonald, in the 
presence of over 300 trade union lead- 
ers from across Canada. 

Unemployment has hovered over 
the five per cent mark in Canada com- 
pared with just over three per cent in 
the United States. 

The CLC said that the government 
must use imaginative policies to de- 
velop the country's economic poten- 
tial to the full, to avoid the waste of 
manpower and resources, and to en- 
sure that all Canadians, and all regions 
of Canada, share fairly in the nation's 
economic growth. 

In addition to alleviating unemploy- 
ment, the Congress urged measures to 
eliminate poverty and to develop Can- 
ada's northland. 

Canada's Indian and Eskimo popu- 
lation are becoming more aware of the 
wrongs which have been done them, 
and every possible help and encourage- 
ment must be advanced to revitalize 
these groups and give them status in 
the community. 

The brief congratulated the Labor 
Department for its enforcement of the 
fair employment practices legislation, 
and urged the establishment of a per- 
manent Human Rights Commission. It 
also proposed the enactment of a fed- 
eral fair accommodation practices act. 

At the time the CLC brief was pre- 
sented February 17th, the Woods Task 
Force on Industrial Relations had not 
yet made its findings public. It was 
supposed to be issued early this year. 
The CLC wanted to know why there 
seemed to be some hesitation on the 
part of the government in releasing it. 
The minister of labor, Bn.ce Macka- 
sey, said that it was being translated 
into French, and as soon as the bi- 
lingual texts were available, it would 
be tabled in parliament. 

President MacDonald said that the 
Congress was pleased with recent de- 
velopments in collective bargaining in 
Canada which have demonstrated the 



value of mediation services. He cited 
the settlement won by the railway 
workers as an example. 

This action proved, he said, that in- 
dustrial disputes, even major ones, can 
be resolved without resort to compul- 
sory arbitration. 

The trade union movement, he 
added, was looking forward to legis- 
lation which would implement the two- 
year-old Freedman Report on labor 
and technological changes. 

Another major point made by the 
brief was that a thorough investiga- 
tion is needed into Canada's social 
security system. 

The CLC said that the government's 
policies with regard to social legislation 
were failing to meet the needs of the 
times. 

"Canadians should by now be able 
to take it for granted that a highly- 
developed and complex industrial state 
like Canada should as a matter of 
course expand and improve its social 
legislation. Yet we are confronted by 
the fact that your government, far 
from moving in this direction, seems 
actually bent on halting any further 
developments. 

Price increases 
Hurt Pensioners 

For people who believe that Canada 
has one of the best programs for old 
age pensioners, the Canadian Labor 
Congress had some words of advice. 

It told the federal government that 
the Canada Pension Plan is failing to 
provide against price increases, that 
the Old Age Security Act was not 
paying enough. 

The CLC urged the government to 
establish an old age pension of $125 
a month plus an income guarantee sup- 
plement of up to $50 with both pay- 
ments protected against price increases. 

There is very little hope that an 
adequate increase will be put into effect 
during the next year or two if at all. 

The government is surveying the 
whole field of social security . . . quiet- 
ly without much fanfare . . .and any 
changes are likely to be made by way 
of consolidation rather than by ex- 
pansion. 

However the Ontario government, in 
announcing its 1 969 budget early in 
March, seemed to go on record as 



favoring a guaranteed annual income 
program. There is some doubt about 
what the Robarts government actually 
meant, but the newspaper headlines 
said that Premier Robarts "embraces 
the principle of guaranteed annual in- 
come." 

If the Conservative government in 
Ontario will embrace it, how can the 
Liberal government at Ottawa ignore 
it? The federal New Democrats came 
out in favor of a guaranteed income 
program at least two years ago. 

1968 Wage Rises 
Averaged 6.6% 

The Canada Department of Labor 
has reported that the average hourly 
wage increase in 1968 was 6.6 per cent 
over the 1 2-month period. 

This is exactly the same percentage 
increase as in 1967, except that in 
1967, the money increase was 15.3 
cents an hour compared with 14.9 
cents last year. 

The analysis covered 530 major un- 
ion contracts in force in '68. in nego- 
tiating units with 500 or more workers 
in Canadian industries other than con- 
struction. 

Construction increases probably 
were better than the above figures. But 
it should be noted that these increases 
cover only organized plants. Workers 
in non-organized plants, and probably 
in smaller plants, probably did worse 
than the 6.6 per cent average. 

$700 Salary Level 
Brings Indebtedness 

A man with a wife and two children 
earning about $100 a week probably 
ends up the year oweing money, ac- 
cording to a study revealed in the 
Ontario legislature by trade unionist 
Ian Deans who is an NDP member of 
the legislature from a Hamilton seat. 

He told the provincial members 
that this man would pay over $900 
in direct taxes to the government in- 
cluding pension plan, medicare and 
hospital payments, leaving him a net 
income of about $4,300 to spend on 
living costs. 

He would pay out $4,500 for rent, 
food, household operations, clothing, 
furniture, transportation, leaving him 



APRIL, 1969 



19 




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with a deficit of over $200 at the end 
of the year. 

Mr. Deans went farther and esti- 
mated that the family would pay a 
total of $1,750 in direct and indirect 
taxes, or about 33 per cent of total 
earnings. 

That's why loan companies do a big 
business and housewives go out to 
work. 

Labor Presses Hard 
For Carter Report 

The above example shows why the 
trade union movement is still pressing 
hard for the implementation of the 
Carter Report on taxation which would 
lessen the burden of taxation on lower 
income groups and load it on the 
corporations and higher income 
groups. 

As of this writing the Canadian La- 
bor Congress postcard campaign in 
support of Carter is having some ef- 
fect. Thousands of these postcards sup- 
plied by the CLC have been signed 
and mailed into the Minister of Fi- 
nance at Ottawa. 

The federal government has moved 
in the direction of improving the estate 
tax, but will not likely do much about 
making any major changes in the tax 
system this year. 

Higher Education 
Means Higher Pay 

The Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
has released the results of a study by 
one of its employees which prove 
conclusively that education pays off in 
more ways than one. 

In fact education provides a bigger 
return on investment than do bonds or 
mortgages — which is a graphic way of 
stating it. 

The return in terms of higher pay 
from an investment in four years of 
high school works out at 16 per cent. 
The return from four years at univer- 
sity works out at 20 per cent. 

The lifetime income of a worker 
with only elementary schooling is esti- 
mated at $51,820. With high school 
training, the total income rises to 
$221,700; with a university degree 
lifetime income rises to $356,108. 

But education must be thought of in 
more than dollars-and-cents terms. It 
improves the quality of living and gives 
one more outlets for one's physical 
and mental resources. 



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20 



THE CARPENTER 



Pompano Beach Local 3206 Hosts Gala Parties for Members 




Local 3206 officers who attended the party held at the Raceway are pictured with 
one of the jockeys, left to right: J. Sheppard, international representative; J. Manko- 
wich, business representative and co-chairman; M. Lampman, treasurer and chairman; 
J. Ashby, trustee; and H. Chakford, president. 

Local Burns 10-Year Mortgage in 3 Years 

____ 




At a recent meeting held in their new Carpenters Hall, officers and members of 
Local 1822, Forth Worth, Texas, burned the mortgage for their new building. Good 
management and some sacrifice have made possible the payment of the entire balance 
within three years. 

Participants in the ceremony included, seated, left to right: William F. Knudseii, 
treasurer; and Joe Youngblood, Sr., warden. Standing, left to right: Melvin L. Butler, 
financial secretary; J. P. Long. Jr., trustee; D. I. Sessums, president; Leonard Adams, 
trustee; Charles D. Cagle. recording secretary; E. T. Avery, chairman of the building 
committee; James T. Avcritt, business representative; and Paul Nelson, conductor. 



Pompano Beach Harness Raceway 
was the setting for one of several gala 
parties held for members of Local 3206, 
Pompano Beach, Fla., leading into the 
holiday season. More than 425 mem- 
bers and guests spent "a night at the 
track." 

Following a roast beef and chicken 
dinner, everyone in attendance assembled 
in reserved grandstand seats to anxiously 
await the "daily double" with the hopes 
of cashing a winning ticket or two. 

Local 3206 also sponsored a Christmas 
party for the children of its members. 
More than 225 children were entertained 
by Santa Claus. who passed out stockings 
filled with candy, and "Chuckles the 
Clown", who performed various magical 
tricks. Grilled hamburgers, frankfurters 
and soft drinks were the order of the 
day, and all who attended left the affair 
happy but tired. 

Local 1987 Moves 
Into New Quarters 

Local 1987 of St. Charles, Missouri, 
one of the 22 affiliated local unions of 
the St. Louis District Council, has ex- 
panded to the point where it was neces- 
sary to acquire larger quarters. The 
present membership numbers 685 and is 
still growing. Its new location is at 3 
Westbury Street. St. Charles. 

In attendance at the dedication cere- 
monies were the Executive Treasurer and 
the Board of Business Representatives of 
the District Council. 

Ollie Langhorst. executive secretary- 
treasurer of the Council, expressed greet- 
ings and good wishes to the membership 
and officers present on behalf of the 
Council. He pointed out that Local 
1987. which celebrated its 50th Anniver- 
sary last year, has made many profitable 
gains over the years and can be proud 
of its new facilities in the modern office 
building recently completed. 

Council business representatives in at- 
tendance at the meeting were Edward 
Thien. Pleasant I en kins. Hermann 
Henke, Leonard Terbrock, Michael Hcil- 

ich. and William Fields. Also present 
was Carl Reiter. assistant executive sec- 
retary-lreasurer. 

Other officers and members, including 
Fred Redd, president of Local 1987. ex- 
pressed their appreciation lo the District 
Council for its assistance. 



APRIL, 1 969 



21 






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pgpppi »^T>|Ba-aM 



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The 40 alleys of the Dane County Coliseum in Madison, Wisconsin, in final stages of completion for ABC bowling tourney. 



Madison, Wisconsin, Carpenters, 
Millwrights Install Alleys for Tourney 

An American Bowling Congress Tournament was held in 
Madison, Wisconsin, recently, on 40 gleaming and precision- 
smooth alleys, installed by members of the United Brotherhood. 

The 50 carpenters and a large crew of millwrights who set 
up the lanes received high praise from ABC officials and from 
Ken Nather, manager of the American Machine and Foundry 
Co. installation and service department. 

Mr. Nather told the sports editor of The Madison Journal: 
"We come into a place and we need 50 carpenters. In some 
cities maybe we get 30. Here we got 50, and 50 good ones. It's 
the same with the millwrights we got. They made my job easy." 

The Central Wisconsin District Council furnished carpenters 
and millwrights for the complete installation. 




Wisconsin members install pin setting equipment. The 40 bowl- 
ing lanes contain enough lumber to frame 18 two-bedroom 
homes, says the installation manager. Madison Journal Photos 



Board Member Bull Addresses St. Louis District Council 




Sixth District Executive Board Member Frederick N. Bull recently addressed delegates and officers of the St. Louis District Coun- 
cil. Present to hear Brother Bull were, seated, left to right: Norman Barth, District Council president; Mr. Bull, Ollie Langhorst, 
Council executive secretary-treasurer; Carl Reiter, assistant executive secretary-treasurer; Erwin C. Meinert, retired Council sec- 
retary-treasurer; George Thornton, Council vice president; Sam Bland, conductor; Larry Daniels, William Dave Jones and Walter 
Webb, trustees. Back row, left to right: Perry Joseph, business manager. (Carpet, Linoleum & Resilient Tile Layers); Pleasant C. 
Jenkins, Michael J. Heilich, Herman C. Henke, William Field, Edward Thien, James L. Cartwright, James A. Watson, Leonard 
Terbrock and Dean Sooter, St. Louis District Council, business representatives. 



22 



THE CARPENTER 



v\\\ X \ ' V\ >.\ 




Send In Your Favorites! Mail To: Plane Gossip, 101 Constitution 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001. SORRY, NO PAYMENT. 



Unsuitable Statement 

The businessman's secretary was 
showing off her new tailored suit, a 
birthday present from her parents. 
Her boss stopped to admire it and 
then went on into his private office 
to greet a waiting client. 

"Sorry to keep you waiting," he 
told the startled client, "but I was 
admiring my secretary in her birth- 
day suit." 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP & SAFE 




Delivering the Needle 

The wife walked in to the husband 
at the TV and said: "Okay, Five-Day- 
Week . . . Seven-Day-Week has your 
dinner ready!" 

FOR BETTER LAWS, GIVE TO CLIC 

Nobody Saw A Menu 

A shapely miss, taking an all-over 
sunbath on the hotel roof, was inter- 
rupted by the manager, who com- 
plained bitterly. "But why should you 
complain?" she asked. "This is the 
tallest building around here and I'm 
not bothering anybody!" "Oh, you're 
not? Lissen lady . . . that's the dining 
room skylight you're on!" 



Pinpointless Joke 

We now have the computer's enor- 
mous ability to store knowledge. 
Added to this, we have Man's won- 
derful ability to think, reason and 
supply information to the computers. 
Thus we can pinpoint all the world's 
troubles. Of course, we can't solve 
them . . . just pinpoint them! 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Necessary Evil? 

The husband staggered into the 
house. "Why do you come home half- 
blind like this?" screamed his wife. 
To which the husband replied: "Be- 
cause I ran outa money, thash why!" 

UNIONISM STARTS WITH "U" 

Mr. Otis Regrets . . . 

An attractive elevator operator, 
listening for the ten-thousandth time 
to the corny remark: "I suppose you 
have your ups and downs," came back 
with this snappy retort: "Oh, it's not 
the ups and downs that bother me 
. . . it's the jerks that make my life 
miserable!" 

— Mrs. Ralph Brown, Decatur, III. 

UNION DUES— TOMORROWS SECURITY 

Using The Old Knife 

A catty female, meeting a friend: 
"Mavis, dahling, you look like a mil- 
lion! But you're really only 35, aren't 
you, deah?" 

— Mrs. Joe Slomer, Florence, Ky. 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 

Western Fans 

Whiskey Willie and his plastered 
pal had every intention of seeing a 
Western movie, but they stumbled 
into a ballet by mistake. After watch- 
ing the ballerinas prance around for 
five minutes, Willie turned to his pal 
and said "If they wanted tall girls, 
why didn't they hire tall girls?" 



Tops in Discrimination 

A carpenter visiting San Francisco 
tried to get into one of the topless- 
waitress cocktail lounges but they 
wouldn't let him in. No coat! 

U R THE "U" IN UNIONISM 

Picket at Random 

Pam Patton of St. Louis wants to 
know what time it is when an elephant 
sits on a picket fence. Easy, Pam; it's 
time to get a new fence. Get the 
point? 

R U A UNION BOOSTER? 

More Heat than Light 

A politician who had changed his 
views rather radically was congratu- 
lated by a colleague. "I'm glad you've 
seen the light," he said. 

"I didn't see the light," came the 
terse reply. "I felt the heat." 




The Wisdom of Youth 

The provoked father was having 
trouble with his teen-aged son. "Per- 
haps," he said to his wife, "we'd do 
him a favor by letting him start shift- 
ing for himself right now . . . while 
he still knows everything there is to 
know!" 



APRIL, 1969 



23 




■ Best Lake Fishing 

Ernest Lind of Monterey, California, 
a member of Local 1323, tripped north 
to Oregon and found the best lake fishing 
in his life. From the shimmering moun- 
tain lake called "Diamond," in company 
with brother-in-law Tony Henderson of 
Medford, Oregon, Ernest boated several 
bowed-in-the-middle stringers of Koka- 
nee (landlocked salmon). "Secret of suc- 
cess," says Brother Lind. "is to troll 
small black flies, very slowly." Koks ran 
from 15 to 18 inches. 

■ Trout on Worms 



By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 



Beat This Drum 




Wolff and big drum 

This month's column recaps some note- 
worthy fish and game achievements of 
the Brotherhood and their families for 
last season: 

One of the biggest drum we've heard 
tell about in many a moon can be cred- 
ited to E. O. Wolff of 202 Stewart, Bay- 
town, Texas, a longtime member of Local 
1274, Decatur, Alabama, now retired 
from the workaday world. He's pictured 
here with one of the two lunkers he 
eased from Trinity Bay — a 36Vi incher 
and a 34 incher. The one hanging on 
the fence tipped the scales at close to 
23 pounds and was duped on a lure 
fashioned with strips of white plastic 
cloth. Can anybody beat that drum? 

■ Heaviest Buck 

A note from Mrs. C. L. Patterson, 
wife of Cecil Patterson, a member of 
Local 2554, Lebanon, Oregon, said her 
husband brought home one of the largest 
bucks she's ever seen — a moose-like mulie 
which sported four points on each side 



of its giant rack and dressed out at 200 
pounds. (That's the heaviest (dressed) 
Oregon mule deer in last season's col- 
umn records, I do believe.) Brother Pat- 
terson downed it with a neck shot from 
his 270 Remington rifle. 

■ Likely Lunker 

William L. Bammann of 1401 S. Oak 
St., Pontiac, Illinois, a member of Local 
728. bested a lunker of a northern pike 
last June 18th which proved more of a 
problem in the boat, with the hook out, 
than in the lake, with the hook in. The 
finny brute measured 42 inches from 
nose to tail and weighed 21 pounds. The 
whopper was caught in Sturgeon Lake, 
Canada, in company with Bob Bammann 
and Glenn and Keith Mott. 



Half-Hour Buck 




Merlin Hoiseth and Buck. 

Merlin Hoiseth of 4840 Eastland St., 
Ft. Worth, Texas, a member of Local 
1822, downed a whitetail deer in his 
home state, a half hour after the season 
opened. Here's a photograph of Merlin 
with his prize which dressed out over 
160 pounds of locker meat. Buck, which 
can be rated as better than average size 
for a whitetail, was downed in snow. 



John Nagel of Bridgeport, Ontario, a 
member of Local 1940 in Kitchener, de- 
clares he's tried a variety of bait and 
artificials for trout but says in the final 
analysis, the best "come on" for those 
brook trout are plain "worms." Brother 
Nagel and wife boated 27 brookies in 
an afternoon of angling in fish-lush 
waters, not too far from his back door. 




Blaze on the Trail 

■ Hunting Horse 

Mrs. F. Schiess of Providence, Utah 
says her husband Fred has a most un- 
usual and helpful hunting partner, namely 
his horse Blaze. She enclosed the fol- 
lowing photograph and writes: "Fred be- 
lieves he has one of the best deer-hunting 
horses to be found. He can either shoot 
while still mounted or step off and shoot, 
without the horse running off. 'Blaze' 
will hunch down while Fred loads the 
deer on its back. By watching its ears, 
he can spot deer that many hunters would 
miss. Here is a picture of Fred and 
Blaze after being saddled with a four- 
point buck from the hills of Utah." 

■ Gar Report 

Fred Chiling of Carthage, New York, 
a member of Local 1536, got more than 
he bargained for on a past-summer fish- 
ing junket to Black Lake, N.Y., a vicious 
gar fish which measured 30 inches down 
the back, plus a saw-toothed bill that 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



1IIIII 




If AY 16-21,1969 ♦- 



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taped a shade under 12 inches. Fred 
enclosed clipping from Walt Disney item 
which claimed that a garfish will usually 
defeat an alligator in equal-size combat. 

■ White Perch 

David Tilip, young angling enthusiast 
whose dad is a member of Local 403. 
Alexandria, Louis- 
iana, nipped a pair 
of way-above-aver- 
age white perch 
from nearby Saline 
Lake. Here's David 
with his finny treas- 
ures, two saucer- 
width white perch, 
each tipping the 
scales over 2Vz 
pounds. 

■ Column Record 

Getting back to column records for 
mule deer, it appears overall column 
record for that species can be credited 
to Wm. B. Pennington of Fountain. Col- 
orado, a member of Local 515. Colorado 
Springs. 

Bill downed a monstrous Colorado 
buck in the Cotton Creek Drainage, 
on the west side of the Sangre de Cristo 
Mountains. It rated 209 6/8 points in 
the standings of the Boone and Crockett 
Club, official keeper of big game rec- 
ords, and, as such, was rated No. 2 in 
the Colorado record book, and No. 5 
in the world record book. 

■ Drop Us A Line 

Members of the brotherhood — and all 
members of the family — can earn a pair 
of illustrated KROCODILE fishing lures. 



^S 



All that's required is a clear snapshot 
of a fishing or hunting scene — and a 
few words as to what the photo is about. 
Send it to: 

Fred Goetz. Dept. OM 
2833 S.E. 33rd Place 
Portland. Oregon 97202 
Please mention your local number and 
zip. Of course, retired members are eligi- 
ble. 




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APRIL, 1969 



25 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



THE FRAMING SQUARE 

The Home Study Course on the 
Framing Square has now been 
compiled into a unit and is avail- 
able through the regular ordering 
sources at the cost of 30 cents per 
copy. 



Austin, Texas, Local 
Builds Own School 

Carpenters Local 1266, Austin, Texas, 
has begun construction of an apprentice- 
ship and training building to be located 
on its own property at 400 Josephine 
Street in the Texas capital. Local officers 
say its the first training facility of its 
kind in the state and one of a few in the 
nation. 

When completed, the building will have 
approximately 3,000 square feet for use 
as classrooms and shops. The building 
is expected to be ready for use in June. 
Designer of the building is Royce Faulk- 
ner of Faulkner Construction Company. 

All the work on the building is being 
done by members of Local 1266 on a 
voluntary basis. The building will have 
classrooms, shops, an office and a storage 
area. Classes will be taught in math, blue- 
print reading, estimating, transit and 
level. 

Classes will be taught Monday through 
Thursday evenings of each week in the 
new building. In the past 10 years, Local 
1266 has trained and elevated to journey- 
men approximately 200 apprentices. 

The local union was chartered in Aus- 
tin in 1888 and has been training carpen- 
ter apprentices since that time. 

San Diego Class, 
Pre-Apprenticeship 

Shown at right is the pre-apprentice- 
ship drywall-training class in San Diego, 
Calif., which concluded its first eight 
weeks of training in December. Since 
that time, it has been continuing the on- 
the-job training phase of the 18-week 
program. 

Several of the trainees were unable to 
work full time because of the tremen- 
dous weather problem in Southern Cali- 
fornia early this year. However, instruc- 
tors expect a good year in all areas of 
the state, which should enable the 14 
trainees to become journeymen on sched- 
ule. 

Class instructor is Paul Cecil, who 
works with Fred Gough, director of the 
apprenticeship and training office in San 
Diego County. 




Looking over plans for the new building at Austin are, left to right, G. A. "Pete" 
McNeil, Local 1266 business representative; Royce Faulkner, owner of Faulkner 
Construction Co., Frederick N. Bull, General Executive Board Member; and W. A. 
Camiield, field representative of the Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship 
and Training. 




San Diego Training Director Joseph C. Kiefer is at right, standing. Trainees shown 
include, seated: Norman Ramirez and Leonard Rodriguez. Standing, from left: 
William Root, Joe Romel, Ed Suarez, Gerald Bradford, Norman Hartnett, Sal Mar- 
tinez, Robert Carter, Charles Hallman, David Quintero, Ervin Duckett, Charles 
Flowers, Glen Ramirez. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



South Florida 
Holds Contest 

South Florida Carpenters held their 
annual Carpenters apprenticeship contest 
recently at Miami. Florida, to select the 
top apprentice, who wfll represent them 
at the Florida State Contest in May. 

Finishing in first place was R. W. 
Phillips; second place. John Cain, both 
are members of Local Union 1379, 
North Miami; third place. Burton Wat- 
kins, a member of Local Union 727, 
Hialeah. 

The winner, R. W. Phillips, receives 
the newly created "Arthur E. Stewart 
Memorial Trophy" sponsored by the 
Miami Carpenters District Council, along 
with a $100 government bond. 




Winner and officials of the South Florida 
Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee (left to right): Norval Graham, chair- 
man of the joint committee; R. W. Phil- 
lips, winner of the coveted Arthur E. 
Stewart Trophy; and John L. Hickey, 
secretary -treasurer of the Joint Appren- 
ticeship Committee. 



Preparing for Koko Head Training 




Finalizing the Koko Head Job Corps Center program in Hawaii recently were, left 
to right. Governor John Burns; Stanley Yanagi, secretary. Local 745; Patsy Mink, 
V. S. Representative State of Hawaii; and Leo Gable, technical director. Brother- 
hood Apprenticeship and Training. 




Participating in Hawaii Instructors orientation were, left to right. William Oviedo, 
apprenticeship coordinator; James Oka; Thomas Taniinoto; Alan Pearson; Jack Har- 
shaw, project coordinator; Satoshi Ogitani; Perry Knight; and Merle Whittom, center 
coordinator. 



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APRIL, 1969 



27 



Winter Meeting, 
National Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship and Training 

Committee 
Americana Hotel, Bal Harbour, Florida, January 31, 1969 



MINUTES 

The National Joint Carpentry Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee met in 
two executive sessions on January 31, 
1969, in Miami Beach. Florida. 

1. CALL TO ORDER 

Chairman Allan called the meeting to 
order at 9:00 A.M., January 31, 1969. 

2. ROLL CALL — Committee Members: 
Representing the United Brotherhood: 

Finlay Allan, Com. Chairman. Leo Ga- 
ble, Nicholas Loope, Frank McNamara, 
Stuart Proctor, Charles Sanford. 

Representing the AGC: Richard Bowie, 
Com. Secy., George Johnson, Fred Lehn, 
Lee Rice, Ed Wasielewski. 

Representing the NAHB: Syd Carnine. 

Guests: Hugh Murphy. Administrator 
— BAT, Washington. D.C.: David Johson 
—AGC, Denver; John Riley, NAHB, 
Washington, D. C; George Vest, United 
Brotherhood of Chicago. Illinois; Guss 
Wells, Denver, Colorado. 

3. MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS 
MEETING 

The reading of the minutes of the Aug- 
ust 14-17, 1968 meeting, which had been 
reviewed earlier by the members of the 
committee, was waived. A motion to ap- 
prove these minutes was made, seconded 
and adopted. 

4. UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

a. Expenditures on 1968 International 
Contest 

A motion was made, seconded and car- 
ried to accept the following financial re- 
port, as amended, for the 1968 Interna- 
tional Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest: 

b. Financing of 1969 International 
Contest 

The Committee considered the re- 
sponses from Local Joint Apprenticeship 
and Training Committees and the Asso- 
ciated General Contractor's Chapters re- 
garding the voluntary contributions of $1 
per apprentice to assist in defraying the 
cost of the International Apprenticeship 
Contest. 

Mr. Bowie reported that he had can- 
vassed the 135 Associated General Con- 
tractor's Chapters and had received only 
nine responses, five of which had indi- 
cated a willingness to make the required 
contribution if it was mandatory of all 
Chapters. 

Mr. Gable reported that they had re- 
ceived only 46 responses from approxi- 
mately 985 JACs, 25 of which had said 
no in that they had no funds. The re- 
mainder indicated a willingness to con- 



r > \ 

FINANCIAL REPORT 

1968 International Carpenters Apprenticeship Contest 

Deposits to Contest Committee 

AGC $ 5,000.00 

NAHB 5,000.00 

UBC 5,000.00 

34 Awards Banquet Tickets 

Kans. City Dist. Co 289.00 

TOTAL $15,289.00 

EXPENSES (DIRECT) 

Name Tags (cash) $ 2.00 

Contest Committee Ribbons 1.20 

Contestants & Judges Lunches 127.1 1 

Bunting Hardware 650.00 

Columbia Glass Company 237.93 

Daniels McCray Lumber Company 3,507.47 

K. C. District Council of Carpenters 240.00 

Ward Parkway Center 500.00 

Hewitt Insurance Agency 61.00 

Advertising Novelty Company 157.91 

Programs and Banquet Tickets 187.17 

Cash Awards 9,000.00 

Awards Banquet (394 Served) 

($3,138.22 (Cash $2,820.00) 318.22 

(34 tickets to K. C. Dist. Co. $289.00) 
(28 guest tickets distributed) 

TOTAL $14,990.01 

Total Check Disbursements $14,988.01 

CASH ON HAND 300.99 

EXPENSES (INDIRECT) 

Photography (UBC) $ 1,100.00 

American Plywood Association 1,832.93 

Midwest Conveyor 3.400.00 

Certificates & Lettering (UBC) 254.00 

Get Acquainted Banquet (AGC & UBC) 1,247.73 

TOTAL $ 7,834.66 

TOTAL COST OF CONTEST $22,824.67 

The following courtesies normally were extended to contestants, by contest com- 
mittee; however the contestants were required to bear costs as follows: 

Awards Banquet, 89 Tickets @ $8.50 each $ 756.50 

Overalls, 54 @ $8.00 each 432.00 

TOTAL $ 1,188.50 

Consideration should be given to supplying the above to all contestants. 

v J 

tribute $1 per apprentice if it became contests were considered, 

mandatory of all committees. The total After considerable discussion, the 

apprentices involved in the committees Committee approved a motion to charge 

expressing a reluctant willingness was a registration fee of $100 per contestant 

2,341. for the 1969 International Carpentry 

Since the National Joint Apprentice- Apprenticeship Contest, 

ship and Training Committee did not The subject of future registration fees 

have the authority to make the $1 per will be considered and determined at a 

apprentice mandatory, other means of later date after the committee has had 

financing the 1969 contest and future the opportunity to review the expendi- 



28 



THE CARPENTER 



tures for the 1969 contest. 

A motion was made that all partici- 
pating Carpenters Joint Apprenticeship 
Committees be notified immediately of 
this action. 

c. Report on Meeting Contest Com- 
mittee — November 1-2, 1968 

1. Outlook for the 1969 International 
Contest. It was reported that, to date, 
sixty-four (64) contestants were sched- 
uled to participate in the 1969 Interna- 
tional Contest — 36 carpenter contestants, 
16 millwright contestants and 12 mill- 
cabinet contestants. 

2. Contest Projects. Chairman Allan 
appointed Mr. Syd Carnine to work with 
Messrs. Gable and Rice in developing the 
contest projects for the 1969 Interna- 
tional Contest. 

3. Cash Awards. A motion was made, 
seconded and carried that two additional 
cash prizes be awarded in the carpentry 
category — a 4th place prize of three hun- 
dred dollars ($300,001 and a 5th place 
prize of two hundred dollars ($200.00). 

The Committee felt that these addi- 
tional prizes in the carpentry category 
were needed in order to offset the in- 
equities in the existing award system — 
i. e.. 30 or more carpenter apprentices 
competing for the same amount of total 
prize money as 10-15 millwright or mill- 
cabinet contestants. 

4. Banquet Tickets. A motion was 
made, seconded and carried that the sale 
of tickets for the Awards Banquet be 
cut-off twenty-four (24) hours prior to 
the Awards Banquet and that a local 
committee be established to carry out 
this policy. 

5. Establishment of District Contests. 
A motion was adopted that the discussion 
of the establishment of district contests 
be tabled and carried over for discussion 
at a future meeting. 

6. Location of 1970 Contest. Mr. Guss 
Wells, Director of Colorado State Car- 
pentry Apprenticeship Program, and Mr. 
David Johnson. Contractor. Denver, 
Colorado, reported on the facilities avail- 
able for housing the 1970 International 
Contest in Denver. Colorado. 

After discussing the report, the Com- 
mittee adopted a motion to hold the 1970 
International Carpentry Apprenticeship 
Contest in Denver, Colorado the week 
of October 5th. 

A motion was made, seconded and 
carried to adopt the report of the Inter- 
national Contest Committee: held on 
November 12. 196S at the Conrad Hilton 
Hotel. Chicago, Illinois, and published 
in the February 1969 issue of the "Car- 
penter." 

d. Other Unfinished Business 
Get-Acquainted Banquet. A motion 

was made and carried to hold a Get- 
Acquainted Banquet at the 1969 Interna- 
tional Contest on the night of August 13. 

S. NEW BUSINESS 

a. Invitation to Host Contest 
The Committee discussed an invitation 
from the Memphis. Tcnn. Joint Car- 
pentry Apprenticeship and Training 



Committee to host either the 1970 or 
1971 International Carpentry Appren- 
ticeship Contest. 

A motion was made and approved to 
inform the Memphis JAC that Denver, 
Colorado had been selected as the site 
for the 1970 Contest and that Memphis, 
Tennessee would be given consideration 
as a possible site for the 1971 Contest. 

b. Identiirairpn of Contest Participants 
A motion was made, seconded and 

approved that all participants in the 
International Carpentry Apprenticeship 
Contest be identified in the following 
manner: name, city, state and all spon- 
soring organizations, whoever they may 
be. 

c. Arrangements for 1969 and 1970 
Contests 

Chairman Allan assigned Messrs. 
Gable and Wasielewski the responsibility 
for coordinating all the arrangements for 
the 1969 and 1970 Contests. 

The Committee also agreed that any 
other member of the Contest Committee 
and/or National Joint Committee could 
attend all meetings setup to discuss ar- 
rangements for the 1969 and 1970 Con- 
tests in addition to or in place of Messrs. 
Gable and Wasielewski. All such meet- 
ings must be attended by at least one 
management and one labor representa- 
tive. 

d. Study of a Three Year Carpentry 
Apprenticeship Program 

A motion was made and carried that 
a subcommittee be appointed by Chair- 
man Allan to reconsider the feasibility 
of developing a three year program for 
carpenter apprentices. 

c. Site of Winter Meetings 

A motion was made, seconded and 
carried that the winter meetings of the 
National Joint Committee always be 
held in the city that has been selected 
as the host city for the following year's 
International Contest. 

f. Invitation to Host 1971 and 1972 
International Contests 

A motion was made, seconded and 
carried that all local joint carpentry 
apprenticeship and training committees 
be informed that a site will be selected 
for the 1971 International Contest, and 
possibly for the 1972 International Con- 
test, at the next meeting of the National 
Joint Committee in Chicago. Illinois. 
August 13-16. 1969. 

The letter should also state that any 
group desiring to be considered as a 
possible host for either the 1971 or 1972 
International Contest should notify the 
Secretary of the International Contest 
Committee. Mr. Leo Gable as soon as 
possible. 

g. Government Financed Training 
Programs 

A motion was made, seconded and 
carried that the National Joint Carpentry 
Apprenticeship and Training Commit- 
tee send a letter to the National Al- 
liance of Businessmen and to the De- 



partment of Labor's Bureau of Work 
Training Programs stating the Commit- 
tee's opposition to the establishment of 
federal training programs in those in- 
stances where the establishment of such 
programs would tend to impair or un- 
dermine the operation of an on-going 
joint carpentry apprenticeship program. 
The National Joint Committee whole- 
heartedly endorses and supports the aims 
and objectives of the National Alliance 
of Businessmen and the programs de- 
veloped by the Department of Labor 
under the Manpower Development and 
Training Act of 1962. However, the 
National Joint Committee is opposed to 
the establishment of such programs in 
the carpentry trades where such pro- 
grams have a detrimental effect on the 
operations of local joint apprenticeship 
committees. 

The Committee feels that government 
records will verify that the most suc- 
cessful federal training programs involv- 
ing the carpentry trades have been those 
programs conducted with the coopera- 
tion and assistance of a local joint car- 
pentry apprenticeship and training com- 
mittee. 

6. TIME AND PLACE OF NEXT 
MEETING 

The next regular meeting of the Com- 
mittee will be held in Chicago, Illinois 
on August 13 and August 16. 1969. in 
conjunction with the 1969 International 
Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest. 

7. ADJOURNMENT 

Chairman Allan adjourned the meet- 
ing at 5:45 P.M. on Friday, January 31. 
1969. 

Respectfully submitted. 
Richard M. Bowie. Secretary 
National Joint Carpentry 
Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee 

Subject: Federal Training Programs 

Mr. Leo C. Beebee 
Executive Vice Chairman 
National Alliance of Businessmen 
726 Jackson Place. N. W. 
Washington. D. C. 20506 

Dear Mr. Beebe: 

The National Joint Carpentry Appren- 
ticeship and Training Committee, at its 
last meeting on January 31, 19h l >. passed 
the following motion: "to inform the 
National Alliance of Businessmen and 
the Dept. of Labor's Bureau of Work 
Training Programs that the National 
Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship and 
Training Committee is opposed to the 
establishment of federal training pro- 
grams in those instances where the es- 
tablishment of such programs would 
tend to impair or undermine the opera- 
tion of an on-going joint carpentry ap- 
prenticeship program." 

The National Joint Committee whole- 
heartedly endorses and supports the aims 
and objectives of the National Alliance 
of Businessmen and the programs de- 
veloped by the Department of Labor 



APRIL, 1969 



29 



under the Manpower Development and 
Training Act of 1962. However, the 
National Joint Committee is opposed to 
the establishment of such programs in 
the carpentry trades where such pro- 
grams have a detrimental effect on the 
operations of local joint apprenticeship 
committees. 

The Committee feels that government 
records will verify that the most suc- 
cessful federal training programs involv- 
ing the carpentry trades have been those 
programs conducted with the coopera- 
tion and assistance of a local joint car- 
pentry apprenticeship and training com- 
mittee. 

Sincerely, 

Richard M. Bowie, Secretary 

National Joint Carpentry 

Apprenticeship and Training 

Committee 



Subject: International Carpenters 
Apprenticeship Contest 

Mr. William V. Hood 
Coordinator, Memphis Carpenters 
Aprenticeship Training Fund 
P. O. Box 12303 
Binghampton Station 
Memphis, Tennessee 38112 

Dear Mr. Hood: 

The National Joint Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Committee 
would like to thank you for your invita- 
tion to host either the 1970 or 1971 In- 
ternational Carpenters Apprenticeship 
Contest. 

At our recent meeting, January 31, 
1969, the National Joint Committee 
voted to hold the 1970 International 
Contest in Denver, Colorado. However, 
no site has yet been selected for the 
1971 Contest and your invitation will 
again be given full consideration at the 
next regular meeting of the committee 
on August 13, 1969. 

We will be in touch with you shortly 
after our August 13th meeting. 
Sincerely, 

Richard M. Bowie, Secretary 
National Joint Carpentry 
Apprenticeship and Training 
Committee 



These States Plan 1969 Contests 



State 


Date 


Carp. 


Mill- 
Cabinet 


Mill- 
wright 


Alabama 




X 


X 


X 


Alaska 




X 






Arizona 


April 26, 1969 


X 






California 




X 


X 


X 


Colorado 




X 


X 


X 


^Delaware 




X 






District of Columbia 


April 26 & May 3, 1969 


X 


X 




Florida 


May 15, 1969 


X 






* Idaho 




X 






Illinois 




X 


X 


X 


* Indiana 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 




X 






Kansas 




X 


X 


x 


Louisiana 




X 




X 


*Maine 




X 






Massachusetts 




X 


X 




Michigan 




X 




X 


Minnesota 




X 






Missouri 




X 


X 


X 


*Nebraska 


June 28, 1969 


X 






Nevada 


April 18 & 19, 1969 


X 


X 




New Jersey 


May 9 & 10, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico 




X 






New York 




X 






Ohio 


May 27 & 28, 1969 


X 




X 


Oklahoma 


June 19 & 20, 1969 


X 






Oregon 




X 


X 


x 


Pennsylvania 


April 11 & 12, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


May 2 & 3, 1969 


X 






Texas 




X 




X 


Utah 




X 






Washington 




X 


X 




Wisconsin 


May 2 & 3, 1969 


X 






Alberta 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 






British Columbia 




X 






Manitoba 




X 






Ontario 


May 29 & 30, 1969 


X 




X 


Totals 




37 


14 


15 



New States entering 1969 contest. 



Subject: Federal Training Program 

Mr. John Ekeberg 

Acting Administrator 

Bureau of Work Training Programs 

1726 M St., N. W., Room 600 

Washington, D. C. 20036 

Dear Mr. Ekeberg: 

The National Joint Carpentry Ap- 
prenticeship and Training Committee, 
at its last meeting on January 31, 1969, 
passed the following motion: "to inform 
the National Alliance of Businessmen 
and the Dept. of Labor's Bureau of 
Work Training Programs that the Na- 
tional Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship 
and Training Committee is opposed to 



the establishment of federal training pro- 
grams in those instances where the estab- 
lishment of such programs would tend 
to impair or undermine the operation of 
an on-going joint carpentry apprentice- 
ship program." 

The National Joint Committee whole- 
heartedly endorses and supports the aims 
and objectives of the National Alliance 
of Businessmen and the programs de- 
veloped by the Department of Labor 
under the Manpower Development and 
Training Act of 1962. However, the 
National Joint Committee is opposed to 
the establishment of such programs in 
the carpentry trades where such pro- 



grams have a detrimental effect on the 
operations of local joint apprenticeship 
committees. 

The Committee feels that government 
records will verify that the most suc- 
cessful federal training programs involv- 
ing the carpentry trades have been those 
programs conducted with the coopera- 
tion and assistance of a local joint 
carpentry apprenticeship and training 
committee. 

Sincerely, 

Richard M. Bowie, Secretary 

National Joint Carpentry 

Apprenticeship and Training 

Committee 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
ffie sen/or members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) FRESNO, CALIF.— Local 3184 
(Production Carpenters) held a special 
pin presentation ceremony for the pur- 
pose of honoring 25- and 30-year mem- 
bers. Pin recipients are pictured, seated, 
left to right: Orvetta Hopper, Frank 
Zuniga, Wheeler Carey, Joseph Silva, 
Macario Juarez, and Pete Cecaci. Back 
row, left to right: Frank Alvarez; David 
Espano; Lowell Clark; Adolph Mazuski; 
Clarence Briggs, Brotherhood representa- 
tive; Leo Winter; Albert Hansen: and 
Josie Hartley. 

The first pension check issued by Local 
3184 was presented to Frank Zuniga. 

Ladies Auxiliary No. 802, Fresno, pre- 
pared and served light refreshments. 

(2) OMAHA, NEB.— Local 253 re- 
cently held its Diamond Jubilee 75th 
Anniversary Banquet at Nasr's Restau- 
rant. The celebration was attended by 
275 members, wives and friends. Mem- 
bers from the following locals affiliated 
with the Omaha District Council, were 
also in attendance: Locals 1606, 1463, 
2359, Omaha; Local 1881, Fremont; Lo- 
cal 856, Columbus; and Local 2364, Nor- 
folk. Also present were numerous build- 
ing trades unions representatives. The 
State Council was represented by Secre- 
tary-Treasurer Gene Shoehigh. 

The program commenced with a 
friendship and cocktail hour, followed by 
a Nebraska steak dinner. 

Fifth District Board Member Leon W. 
Greene, general representative of the 
Brotherhood, and George Chadwell. pres- 
ident of Local 253, presented awards to 
one 50-year member and seven 25-year 
members. The recipients are pictured, 
left to right: Claude L. Albaugh; Elam 
Rupe; Carl Carlson; Leon Greene, Fifth 
District Board member; Nelleman Bernth, 
50-year member; Ray Winningham; Ray 
Williams; and George Chadwell, presi- 
dent. Not pictured are M. Brunstcdt and 
C. F. Frazicr. 

Nelleman Bernth, recipient of the 50- 
year award from Local 253. has a son. 
Andrew, with 31 years membership and 
a grandson. Danny, with six years mem- 
bership — a three-generation family. 




Gold card members who have been 
holding membership in Local 253 dating 
back to 1905 are: A. Jorgensen, 1905; 
Charles Custer, 1906; H. Sorensen, 1909; 
Ferry Johnson, 1910; Tom Love, 1910; 
F. Bowerman, 1912; Frank Robbins, 
1912; Frank Dickey, 1914; A. J. Ramm, 
1914; E. Sundberg, 1915; Carl Auguston, 
1916; Charles Lewis, 1916; Harry Ser- 
viss, 1916; and William Hansen, 1917. 

Senior officers of Local 253 attending 
the dinner-dance were: George Chadwell, 
president; Elam Rupe, vice president; 
Guy Byers, recording secretary; Dave 
Chadwell, financial secretary -treasurer; 
George Carlow, treasurer; Frank Blank- 
man, conductor; Sam Short, warden; and 
Joe Blankman, Roy Moody, and John 
Petersen, trustees. 



The banquet committee was composed 
of Elam Rupe. George Carlow. Max 
Sundsboe, Sam Short, and Tony OKon. 

Following the awards presentation, a 
dance completed the evening. 

(3) LIMA, OHIO— Local 372 recent- 
ly held its annual banquet and pin pres- 
entation ceremonies in honor of seven- 
teen 25-year members, at the Scot's Inn 
Motel. Pin recipients, left to right, are: 
Chalmer Baker. Raymond Cook, Virgil 
Lee, Robert Hitchcock, Robert Tice, 
Paul Winegardner, and Lelon Wright. 

Other members of Local 372 who re- 
ceived pins were: H. E. Brunson, Ray 
Mauger, Scott Protsman, Thomas Sell. 
Frank Shook, Ray Van Horn, Lincoln 
Wolfe, Norton Edge, Elza Sanders, and 
Russell Vertner. 




APRIL, 1969 



31 




(4) CLINTON, OKLA. — Twenty-five 
year service pins were recently awarded 
to members of Local 1099 at a special 
presentation ceremony. Honorees, seat- 
ed, left to right: Jacob Cornelson, 27 
years; Charlie E. Smith, 27 years; Jewel 
Taylor, 27 years; Paul Flick, 30 years. 
Second row, left to right: Ellis G. Smith, 
business representative and financial sec- 
retary; O. T. Herrald, 27 years; Jack 
Taylor, 28 years; Woodrow Parker, pres- 
ident. Back row, left to right: Walter 
Kutz, 35 years; Fred Larson, 28 years. 



(5) ATLANTA, GA. — Members of 
Local 225 were honored at a special 
recognition dinner held recently, and 25- 
year membership pins were presented to 
seven honorees, seated, left to right: J. S. 
Stephen, Henry R. McCollum, and J. L. 
Willard. Standing, left to right: R. H. 
Story, Marvin Alexander, J. H. Gowder, 
and Virgil A. Prater. 

Eight additional members of Local 225 
were eligible to receive pins but were 
unable to attend the ceremonies; mem- 
bers recognized were: B. A. Campbell, 
E. F. Connell, Alexander E. Lively, Ben 
Partain, Odell Payne, Clarence Strange, 
C. Teate, and A. R. Wood. 

(5A) Guests of the members of Local 
225 attending the ceremonies are also 
pictured seated at the banquet tables. An 
enjoyable evening will be remembered 
by all who attended the affair. 

(6) LOUISIANA, MO.— Local 1008 
recently honored its 25-year members at 




an awards banquet held at the Duvall 
Club Room in Clarksville. 

Twelve officers and members present 
at the ceremonies were, left to right: 
A. E. Kuna; Leonard Terbrock, business 
representative, St. Louis District Coun- 
cil; Harrold Buchholz, financial secre- 
tary; William Bolomey, charter mem- 
ber; Lawrence Wood, charter member; 
Herman Henke, business representative, 
St. Louis District Council; D. Brand- 
stutter; Elba Schleiper; George Rector; 
Paul Shotton; OUie W. Langhorst, execu- 
tive secretary-treasurer, St. Louis District 
Council; and William Fields, business 
representative, St. Louis District Council. 



(6A) Ten other officers and members of 
Local 1008 attending the banquet were, 
left to right: Louis Davis; Donald Flans- 
burg, president; Bud Kuna; James Inlow, 
Elba Schleiper; George Rector; Clyde 
K. Silvey, recording secretary; Eugene 
Henry; Paul Shotton; and Harold Buch- 
holz, financial secretary. 

Donald Flansburg, president of Local 
1008, presented the pins to the members. 

Those members receiving pins from 
Local 1008 but not present at the cere- 
monies were Charles White, C. S. Side- 
bottom, L. M. Dawson, Tony Potter, 
Louis Beadle, Allison Dewey, William 
Richardson and Robert L. Brown, charter 
member. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 




(7) FARMINGTON, MO.— At a recent 
recognition dinner, membership pins were 
awarded to members of Local 1795 for 
their outstanding and dedicated service to 
the Brotherhood over the past 25 years. 

Some of the pin recipients are, seated, 
left to right: Adam Bollinger, 25 years; 
John Eck, treasurer, 25 years; Jasper 
Detmer, 25 years; Floyd Miller, 25 years. 
Second row, left to right: James Watson, 
business representative, St. Louis Dis- 
trict Council; James Hager, financial sec- 
retary, 46 years; Ray Bollinger, 25 years; 
Ed Chamberlain, 25 years; Oscar Medley, 
recording secretary, 25 years; L. R. Un- 
derwood, president of Local 1795. 



Six members of Local 1795 who were 
unable to attend the ceremonies were: 
Ellis Bollinger, 28 years; Roy Jenson, 27 
years; M. Parrott, 26 years; E. E. Par- 
rott, 26 years; Carl Westmeyer, 26 years; 
and Harry Shell, 27 years. 

(8) KNOXVILLE, TENN. — Retired 
General Representative Vance Stamps 
was recently presented with a gold 50- 
ycar pin at his home by his successor, 
VV. VV. Orr, general representative of Lo- 
cal 50. Members present are pictured 
from left to right: Joe Hodge, business 
representative; Joseph R. Keith, treas- 
urer; Claude Turner, president; \V. W. 
Orr, general representative; Brother 



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Stamps; Labe A. Jenkins, financial sec- 
retary; George Henegar, state represent- 
ative; and Roy Hundley, business repre- 
sentative. East Tennessee District Coun- 
cil. 

Two other members, W. M. Taylor 
and S. R. Slingluff, of Local 50 were 
eligible to receive 50-year awards, but 
were unable to attend the meeting due 
to illness. 

(8A) Following a brief business meet- 
ing, more than 50 members of Local 50 
were presented silver pins for having 
completed 25 years of continuous mem- 
bership. 





(9) LA FOLLETTE, TENN.— Four 
members of Local 2132 received 25-year 
service pins in ceremonies held late last 
year. Shown in the photograph, left to 
right: Karl Mowell, president of the local, 
who presented pins to George Trow- 
bridge, Hugh Ford, and Frank Ford. 

(9A) Also pictured is Ben F. Hammon 
(left), pleased recipient of a 25-year 
award from Local 2132. President 
Mowell is commemorating him for his 
outstanding service to the local. 

(10) DETROIT, MICH.— Charter 
members Clarence Vogel, financial sec- 
retary, and John Max, Sr. received 
special recognition at a testimonial din- 
ner honoring twenty-nine 25-year mem- 
bers of Local 2265 (Tile and Linoleum 
Workers) at the Polish Century Club re- 
cently. They are pictured being wel- 
comed by leaders of city and state Car- 




I 



penters Union councils, left to right: Tom 
Suarez, president of Local 2265; Ray 
Cebalt, president, Michigan State Car- 
penters Council; Clarence Vogel, finan- 
cial secretary; John Max, Sr.; John R. 
Harrington, secretary-treasurer, Detroit 
District Council; and Gerald Gavin, busi- 
ness representative of Local 2265. 



(10 A) The 25-year members honored 
by Local 2265 are seated, left to right: W. 
Pepp; J. Polio; R. Vick, J. Karwoski, E. 
Powers; John Max, Sr.; L. Traskie; G. 
Turner; Clarence Vogel, financial secre- 
tary; R. Amsden; J. LeVasseur; S. Pas- 
son; A. Balames; and E. Hurlburt. Sec- 
ond row, left to right: H. Redmond, C. 
Klein, E. Peabody, E. Irvine, L. Elsey, 

F. Myers, W. Bonsky, W. Brooks, C. 
Tisdale, E. Uberchar, C. Owens, D. 
Charlton, E. Callan, A. Miltenberger, P. 
Markovich, and J. Shollack. Back row, 
left to right: John R. Harrington, secre- 
tary-treasurer, Detroit District Council; 
and Executive Board members, Local 
2265, H. Kilroy; R. Wedge; D. Boase; 

G. Price; L. Kuhn; Gerald Gavin, busi- 
ness representative; Tom Suarez, presi- 
dent; E. Potter; W. Potter; Marvin 
Baumey, recording secretary. 




10A 



Wood Veneer Artist 

Continued from Page 14 

and cabinetmakers' glue for adhesive. 
He uses 20 to 30 different kinds of 
wood from all parts of the world — 
some scraps from local mills, some 
from a local dealer, and some from as 
far away as London, England. 

The ideas for pictures come prin- 
cipally from photographs, although 



some are suggested by the grain and 
color of the veneer. Regular cabinet- 
maker's tools are often sufficient, but 
a very sharp and strong knife is a 
must. He often uses a veneer saw as 
well. 

• 
TONGUE TWISTER 
"Of all the saws that I saw saw, 1 
never saw a saw like this saw saws." 
— Nicholas Pellicciotti, 
Local 492, Reading, Pa. 



Oregon's 26 million acres of commer- 
cial timber could rebuild every house in 
the United States, National Geographic 
says. 

• 
A hundred years ago the average 
American worked 65V2 hours a week. 
His counterpart today works only 40V2. 

• 
When George Washington took the 
oath of office as President in 1789, the 
United States had a population of only 
4,000,000, National Geographic says. 



34 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMOR 



M 



s. 



L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, NJ. 

Bonham, William 
Macaluso, Mariano 
Naughton, Daniel 
Olsen. Kenneth 
Syverson, Henry 
Wells, Herbert 

L.U. No. 27, 
TORONTO, ONT. 

Butt, James 
Duhamel, Napoleon 
Fulton, Edward 
Hawes, Fred 
Lane, Thomas 
Leatham, William 
Miller, John R. 
Monk, Earl 
Tuck, Arthur 
Whiteway, Fred 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIF. 

Miller, Leo T. 

L.U. NO. 38, 

ST. CATHERINES, ONT. 

Greenhill, W. 
Muir, J. 
Schiel, G. 
Tenbroeck, H. 

L.U. NO. 42, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Amundson, Moran P. 
Anderson, Bernard 
Florio, Louis 

Gerhmann, Adolph "Otto" 
Kapsh, Joseph 
Rewers, Ben 
Xeureb, Manuel 
Zolotar, Meyer 

L.U. NO. 48, 
FITCHBURG, MASS. 

Lahti, Urho 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILI.E, TENN. 

Romines, Albert 
Stanley, Charles 

L.U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Dziegiel, Lawrence J. 
Thcroux, Eugene 

L.U. NO. 71, 

FORT SMITH, ARK. 

Brown, H. T. 
Garrett, Sterling 
Weis, Joe H. 

L.U. NO. 80, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Babarskas, Alfonsus 
Cortellassi, Carmen 
Dorland. William 
Egcrter. Oscar G. 
Giordano, Santo 
Hansen, Austin 
Jacobsen, Theodore 
lohanson, Nels A. 
Jones, Griffith 
Kearin, Dennis 



Kern, Elmer 
Kruse, Herbert, Sr. 
Larsen, Axel F. 
MacKenzie. Alexander 
Mayer, Chlodwig H. 
Nelson, Sven 
Nilsen, Henry 
Nisbet, Andrew, Sr. 
Petersen, Sigurd 
Regan, George F. 
Reiten. Ole 
Stevenson. Alexander 
Thurman, Joseph C. 
Thyfault, Adelare 

L.U. NO. 98, 
SPOKANE, WASH. 

Anderson, Frank G. 
Bestrom, Lester R. 
Boyer, Lawrence 
French, Claude R. 
King, George M. 
Thomson, Ingwer 
Trotter, Harley E. 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Holland, Wriliam 
Johnsen, Erling E. B. 

L.U. NO. 104, 
DAYTON, OHIO 

Badgley, Raymond E. 
Bodiker. Henry 
Brown, Paul H. 
Clark. Joe W. 
demons. Cecil 
Elizer, Stanford 
Hardy, Milton 
Leivan, Paul 
Snell. Howard 
Springer, W. Harvey 

L.U. NO. 117, 
ALBANY, N.Y. 

Bayard, Joseph 
Collen, Jacob H. 
D'Augustino. Louis 
Fox. Howard J. 
Francis, Delbert E. 
McDonald. Albert 
Van Vorse, Ernest, Sr. 
Whittle. Joseph B. 

1.1. NO. 129. 
HAZI.ETON. PA. 

Brauch. Fred C. 
Stech. Peter 
Strack. George F. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Bobbin, Walter M. 
Denbow, P. G. 
Ricks. Charles A. 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Pearson. Nels 

I .1. NO. 184. 



L.U. NO. 190, 
KLAMATH FALLS. ORE 

Berglund, John M. 
Hesterlee, Marvin E. 
Ohles, Charles M. 
Stroud, Loren E. 

L.U. NO. 211, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Grindel, George J. 
Powless, Frank 
Richard, Leroy 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Bailey, R. C. 
Meador, W. A. 

L.U. NO. 257, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Fagerlund, David 
Gustavson. Gunnar 
Manookian, Eddy 
Matson, George 
Muller, Richard 

L.U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Bock, Carl 

L.U. NO. 287, 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Webster, Harry E. 

L.U. NO. 297, 
KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

Macek. Rudolf 
Panse, J. J. 
Sherman, William 
VanderMeer, Henry 

L.U. NO. 298, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Gerbehy, Henry A. 
Soehnell. Raymond 

L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

McKeel, Charles S. 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Parker, James A. 

L.U. NO. 345. 
MEMPHIS, TENN. 

Dunlap, J. A. 
Graham, C. A. 
Hoover, George W. 
Lee, A. R. 
Mabry. W. O. 
McCarter, W. R. 
McLennan, F. D. 
Noe. O. L. 
Rumph. A. L. 
Scott, S. M. 

I..U. NO. 361. 
DUI.UTH, MINN. 

Eden. Carl G. 
Hanson. Wallace 



SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH Rosberg , John 



Miller. Ezra 
Salazar, Abel C. 
Stuart, F. L. 
Welling. LcRoy 
Will, Ernest O. 



St. Marie. Albert 

L.U. NO. 362. 
PUEBLO, COLO. 

Sands, Harry C. 



L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Simone. Anthony 

L.U. NO. 372, 
LIMA. OHIO 

Rebout. E. F. 
Grunden, Herbert 
Hayden, James 

L.U. NO. 406, 
BETHLEHEM, PA. 

Crout. Kenneth 

L.U. NO. 411, 

SAN ANGELO, TEX, 

Pedigo, Joe Sidney 

L.U. NO. 433, 
BELLEVILLE, ILL. 

Hohm. Harry 
Mueller, August 
Schmidt. Edward 
Wenzel, Frank 

L.U. NO. 469, 
CHEYENNE, WYO. 

DeFond, William 
Reid. William 

L.U. NO. 470, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Ehrenheim, Fritz 
Hagen. Alvin 
Irvin, Ernest E. 
Iverson, Elmer 
LaRue. Neal 
Messner. C. W. 
Nystrom. John A. 
Resseller. Henry W. 
Rogers, Donald 
Russell, Fred E. 
Shranklen. E. R. 
Terrell. Homer C. 
Vierra. Frank. Jr. 
Westlin. Fred 
Williams. Woodroe 

L.U. NO. 558. 
ELMHURST, ILL. 

Knicker, Alfred H. 

L.U. NO. 579, 

ST. JOHN'S NFLD. 

Barrett. Lemuel 

IT. NO. 583, 
PORTLAND. ORE. 

Moore, Allen V. 
Weber. E. B. 

L.U. NO. 586, 
SACRAMENTO, CALIF. 

Boyce, William A. 
Cottrell, Jessie D. 
Bochenek. Joe 
Harrison. Eduar B. 
Hull, John B. 
Jones. Amos G 
Lal'erlc. Robert J. 
Livingston. Charles J. 
Smith. Chester W. 
Watson. Stanley B. 
Williams, Thomas J. 

L.U. NO. 608. 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

Bialo, Nathan 



Cunningham, Andrew 
Hronich, Michael 
Leeder, John 
McGahon, James 
Zandemenego. Eugenio 

L.U. NO. 627, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Anderson, John R. 
Davis, Louis 
Goff. Irwin C. 
Holloway. James E. 
Meades, William F. 
Monahan, John J. 
Thompson, Emerson 

L.U. NO. 665, 
AMARILLO, TEX. 

Holland, T. H„ Sr. 
«cott, G. R. 
Small-wood, E. L. 

L.U. NO. 710, 

LONG BEACH, CALIF. 

Bartee. John L. 
Calloway, James A. 
Davis, Lewis E. 
DeNeui. Henry F. 
Dickerson, John A. 
Morton. James A. 
Schmidt, Thomas 
Washburn, John V. 
Watson. Joseph E. 
Wright. Colbert 

L.U. NO. 746, 
NORWALK, CONN. 

Lycett. Charles 

L.U. NO. 751, 
SANTA ROSA, CALIF. 

Lovato. Benses 
Lowe. William 
Houweling, Richard 
Pettit, R. E. 

L.U. NO. 871, 
BATTLE CREEK, 
MICH. 

Maloney, William 

L.U. NO. 960. 
FORTUNA. CALIF. 

Arnold. Ben 
Barnes. Eugene 

L.U. NO. 982. 
DETROIT. MICH. 

Gebhardt. Charles 
O'Krafka, William 

L.U. NO. 1022. 
PARSON, KANS. 

Wheat, V. D. 

L.U. NO. 1098, 
BATON ROl GE, IV. 

Crane. Albert 
Huddleslon, Vernon 
Oleson, M. A. 
Smith, Leo 

L.U. NO. 1138. 
TOLEDO. OHIO 

Beebe. Elmer 
Brown. F. J. 

Continued on Page 36 



APRIL, 1969 



35 



IN MEMORIAM 

Continued from Page 35 



Collum, Romine 
Ervin, James 
Hupenbecker, Carl 
Kohring, A. F. 
Roadarmel, Bert 
Sheets, William 
Vincent, Theodore 
Wooley, D. C. 

L.U. NO. 1140, 

SAN PEDRO, CALIF. 

Brady, Herbert, Sr. 
Cunningham, Homer 
Smith, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Samel, Guy 

L.U. NO. 1175, 
KINGSTON, N.Y. 

Tyler, Kenneth B., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1266, 
AUSTIN, TEX. 

Harrison, Floyd W. 
Herwig, Charles L. 
McDonald, Leroy 
Thomas, E. W. 

L.U. NO. 1289, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Holzschuh, Arthur J. 
Lidin, Karl G. 



Lytle, Archie M. 
Miller, Ray W. 
Myers, William D. 
Morgan, Lloyd 
Schlicting, Fred H. 

L.U. NO. 1332, 
GRAND COULEE, 
WASH. 

Shafer, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 1367, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Witt, Herman 

L.U. NO. 1373, 
FLINT, MICH. 

Artis, George R. 

L.U. NO. 1394, 

FT. LAUDERDALE, FLA 

Cox, Walter E. 
May, Lowell 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 

Jarvis, David 
Nigro, Lawrence 
Purdy, James 



L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B. C. 

Eastwood, R. C. 
Potter, A. G. 
L.U. NO. 1599, 
REDDING, CALIF. 

Record, Harold 
Shumaker, Clarence 

L.U. NO. 1644, 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

Brenny, Frank 
Broberg, Ernest 
Courtney, Henry 
Grimes, Ola 
Haider, Rudolph 
Heilman, Robert J. 
Jensen, John P. 
Kleve, Harry 
Mattson, Walter 
Mellum, Guy 
Rammer, Clarence 
Rasmussen, Axel 
Smethurst, Albert 
Tedamonson, Ingebrit 
Thaxter, Robert 
Wisniak, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1654, 
MIDLAND, MICH. 

Jones, St. Clair 



L.U. NO. 1423, L.U. NO. 1797, 

CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. RENTON, WASH. 

De Salme, Orrin R. Burns, Robert C. 



Haskell, Ernest H. 
Hoke, Ercil A. 
Holbert, Thomas L. 
Meredith, Theo F. 
Motor, Albert 
Nelson, Borge 
Rolla, Rudolph 
Van Winkle, Clyde W. 
Whitaker, Leon M. 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FT. WORTH, TEX. 

Price, Howard 

L.U. NO. 1835, 
WATERLOO, IOWA 

Bruns, John 
Heim, Leo 
Homan, A. W. 
Moeller, Alvin 
Petersen, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1846, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Ducote, Bill 
Lemley, Albert 
Tamor, Sebastian 

L.U. NO. 1849, 
PASCO, WASH. 

Basey, I. D. 
Fredrick, C. F. 
Hopper, N. J. 



L.U. NO. 2073, 
MILWAUKEE, WISC. 

Barg, Arnold 
Margis, William 

L.U. NO. 2114, 
NAPA, CALIF. 

Handcock, Summer 

L.U. NO. 2143 
UKIAH, CALIF. 

Hermanson, Wayno L. 

L.U. NO. 2375, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Burris, James 
Collins, Clarence E. 
Little, John F. 
Loy, Carl 

McMahon, Emil "Woody" 
Merryman, Frank S. 
Olsen, Jens George 
Smith, Harold R. 
Smoot, Wilson E. 
Tomovich, Michael R. 

L.U. NO. 2415, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Little, P. M. 

L.U. NO. 2466, 
PEMBROKE, ONT. 

Schultze, Otto 



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36 



THE CARPENTER 



PAUL BUNYAN 

Continued from page 3 

work of this kind ever done. Labor 
conditions were very unstable, and 
plumbers were reported to be on 
strike for higher pay and better 
working conditions! 

As time passed, the enormous for- 
est giant had become a greater 
myth and a most influential lumber- 
man. His life has been an open 
book of inspiration to woodsmen 
and foresters since the beginning 
of history. 

It has been said that the big, burly 
lumberman spent many years ex- 
ploring the Great Lakes region, the 
mountains of the Pacific Northwest, 
and the remote provinces of Canada. 
As the logging industry spread 
across the continent from Maine to 
Oregon, wherever lumberjacks went 
they took with them the jokes and 
tales surrounding the legend of their 
powerful prototype and hero. Paul 
cherished among his friends mighty 
men of the Western plains such as 
Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, and Buf- 
falo Bill. Together they sought out 
the petrified forest in Yellowstone 
country. Nature in the wilderness 
held no terrors for these men. 

The French-Canadian rivermen 
and woodsmen made up songs about 
Paul which have since become folk- 
lore in the provinces. His fame was 
further spread through children's 
interpretations and by American In- 
dian tales. Through the years, many 
logging camp tale-tellers contributed 
bits of lore to the legend, which 
grew with the imagination of work- 
men who visualized the giant as 
though he really lived. Some of the 
stories among those best known and 
enjoyed are tales of "Babe, the 
Blue Ox"; "The Winter of the Blue 
Snow"; and "Digging Puget Sound". 

Although it has never been prov- 
en, authorities agree that the French 
and Irish lumberjacks of the Lake 
States originated many stories of 
Paul and his Blue Ox. 

It has been mentioned that every- 
time Babe was shod, they had to 
open up another Minnesota iron 
mine. He could never be fed twice 



at the same camp, as one meal ex- 
hausted all the feed one outfit could 
tote in a year. In spite of overhead 
cost and maintenance, Babe was a 
valuable piece of equipment because 
of high efficiency and low operating 
cost. He constituted Paul's assets 
and liabilities. When cost sheets 
were figured on Babe, it was dis- 
covered that upkeep and overhead 
were expensive, but the charges for 
operation and depreciation were low 
and efficiency was very high. How 
else could Paul have hauled logs to 
the landing — a whole section, or 
hundreds of acres at one time. When 
Babe died he was buried in South 
Dakota, his burial mound forming 
what is now known as the Black 
Hills. 

Paul first made news in The 
American Lumberman's Journal. 
July 24. 1910, as the most gigantic 
and rugged of all woodsmen. It was 
even thought that he had invented 
the pulp industry, as we know it 
today. In 1914, The Seattle Star 
ran a series of tall tales for two 
weeks about Paul Bunyan. This was 
its manner of introducing him to 
the general public and to readers 
outside the lumber industry. In 
1922, his name was spread on the 
editorial page of The Portland Ore- 
gonian. Since the gold rush, thous- 
ands of articles and many books on 
the life and times of Paul Bunyan 
have been published. 

Among lumbermen, the mighty- 
muscled, bearded giant, whose char- 
acter may or may not have been 
based originally on a real person, 
did achieve heroic proportions. 
Whatever his habitat, Paul is surely 
the greatest of the creations of gen- 
erations of men. He reflected the 
American exuberance and extrava- 
gance which embodies the hearts of 
millions of American workmen who 
have done hard and perilous labor. 
The most significant fact about such 
a character is not who he was in real 
life, but what he has become in the 
imaginary life of the people who 
still cherish his memories today. Like 
John Henry, who lent inspiration and 
courage to those who labored in the 
railroad industry of the South, such 
folk idols continue to inspire the 
workers of North America. ■ 



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APRIL. 1969 



37 



LAKELAND NEWS 



William Tannebring, Local Union 107, Worcester, Mass., died February 4, 1969. 
His ashes were shipped to Worcester for burial. 

Joseph Angle, Local Union 787, Brooklyn, New York, died February 6, 1969. 
Burial was in Brooklyn. 

Joseph Felker, Local Union 419, Chicago, Illinois, died February 16, 1969. Burial 
was in Chicago. 

David Murray, Local Union 1, Chicago, Illinois, died February 20, 1969. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Joseph Burcal, Local Union 1786, Chicago, Illinois, died February 28, 1969. Burial 
was in Chicago. 

Members who visited the Home during February, 1969: 



Edward E. Olson, Kenosha, Wis. Local 
161 

James R. Mellon, Pittsburgh, Pa. Local 
2274 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel L. Laurens, 
Brewster, N.Y. Local 1104 

John Framnes, Somerville, N.J. Local 
715 

John Grassinger, R. 4, West Bend, 
Wis. 

Benjamin E. Baxter, Washington Boro, 
Pa. Local 101 

Herman Schaefer, Chicago, 111. Local 
242 

Paul F. Snyder, Pittsburgh, Pa. Local 
2274 

George Stroot, Terre Haute, Ind. Local 
133 

Wilson Bailey, Middleport, N.Y. Local 
289 

Lage Burgeson, Gary. Ind. Local 985 

Walter S. Knicht, Largo, Fla. Local 
531 

George F. Hanson & Wife, Bradenton. 
Local 599 

Carl H. Mullen & Wife, Hammond, 
Ind. 

Mr. & Mrs. Harry C. Casteel, Zion, 
111. Local 448 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles McDowell, Zion, 
III. Local 448 

Lewis Hesgard, Hammond, Ind. Local 
599 

Joe P. Guy, Hammond, Ind. Local 599 

Mulford E. Kocher, Orange, N.J. Local 
349 

Frederick M. Gorman & Wife, Bell- 
wood, 111. Local 1 

Harold E. Rickard, Quincy, Mass. 
Local 40 

Archie J. Vetter, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Local 889 

Mr. & Mrs. J. E. Jones. Lakeland, Fla. 

Mr. & Mrs. J. O. Whiddon, Keystone 
Heights, Fla. Local 1118 

Mr. & Mrs. Chester E. Edwards, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. Local 232 

Mr. & Mrs. Norman Glickman, Med- 
way, Mass. Local 847 

Mr. & Mrs. Warren Oragin, Mt. Dora, 
Fla. Local 1108 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Vewell, Maywood, 111. 
Local 13 

Mr. & Mrs. Keith Layland, Atlanta, 
Ga. Local 168 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Jacobs, Boston, 
Mass. Local 40 

Albert F. Cooper, Boston, Mass. Local 
218 

Chester Reed, Zanesville, Ohio. Local 
716 

Dwight Reed, Lakeland, Florida. Local 
2217 



Charles L. Lohill, Flat Rock, 111. Local 
274 

Marshall G. Miller, Ellicott City, Md. 
Local 101 

Robert W. Perschall. Bloomington, 111. 
Local 63 

C. T. & Pauline Brown, Plainfield, 111. 
Local 1128 

Henry O. Docken, London, Ont. Local 
1946 

Julius Milstein, Bronx, N.Y. Local 488 

Arthur Dobnik, Chicago, III 

Mr. & Mrs. C. O. Solmi, Baltimore, 
Md. Local 101 

Mr. & Mrs. Wallace Jaspring, Fergu- 
son, Mo. Local 417 

Mr. & Mrs. M. E. Lyons, Louisville, 
Ky. 

Mr. & Mrs. Jess C. Allen, Louisville, 
Ky. Local 64 

Mr. & Mrs. Einar Falk, Flint, Mich. 

Mr. & Mrs. John Carlton, St. Peters- 
burg, Fla. 

Mr. Uno Anderson, St. Petersburg, Fla. 

LTC & Mrs. George H. LeClaire, Jr., 
Augusta, Ga. (visiting gravesite) 

Anthony Borrelli, Folsom, Pa. Local 
456 

Stanley W. Davis, Belair, Md. Local 
101 

Walter E. Barron, Ellsworth, Maine. 
Local 459 

Elmer E. Stolzman, Cleveland Wis. Lo- 
cal 657 

Richard Vandernorf, Williamsville, 
N.Y. Local 1577 

Mrs. Lyle H. Brown, Zephyrhills, and 
Waupun, Wis. 

Harry Ames, Fredericton, N.B., Canada 

Paul C. Merserean, Fredericton, N.B., 
Canada 

Cecil A. Crothers, New Waterford, 
Ohio. Local 171 

Lee Gower, Danville, 111. Local 269 

Roy T. Lindberg, Stamford, Conn. 
Local 210 

Gustav Newgren, Chicago, 111. Local 
62 

Raymond D. Albrite, Arlington, Va. 
Local 132 

Vincent Fleming, Bayport, N.Y. Local 
412 

Aubrey E. Dowell, Seabrook, Md. 
Local 1631 

Olaf Nord, Chicago 111. Local 13 

Lernard Aronlund, Rocky Point, L.I. 
Local 1456 

J. J. Knutetsky, Coxsackie, N.Y. Local 
117 

Philip Anderson, New Rochell, Local 
350 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Stulgus, Milwaukee, 
Wis. 



Larry Hayes, Springfield, 111. Local 
16 

Chas. Eagleton, Kalamazoo, Mich. Lo- 
cal 297 

Martin Akerman, Montclair, N.J. Lo- 
cal 791 

John Philias Comean, North Anson, 
Maine. Local 83 

Gilbert Reeves, Burlington, Ky. Local 
785 

Teague E. Wynne, Florence, Miss. 
Local 1471 

Oliver Runertsen, Brooklyn N.Y. Local 
257 

Gustav Krienke, Plainfield, N.J. Local 
155 

John W. Lasseter, Bradenton, Fla. 
Local 669 

Lambert Hofstra & Family, Riverside, 
111. Local 1128 

Albert G. McCaleb & Wife, Westlake, 
Ohio. Local 1108 

E. Laager & Wife, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 
Local 1456 

Elias Lackonen, Oneida, N.Y. Local 
1016 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard Garnett, Chicago, 
111. Local 1 

Ben Apato, Chicago, 111. Local 62 

Alfred A. Anderson, Providence, R.I. 
Local 1695 

William R. Lehner, Chicago. Local 242 

Howard Drew, Sr., Dunstable, Mass. 
Local 49 

Donald E. Drew, Dunstable, Mass. 
Local 49 

Claus Soderkind, Chicago, 111. Local 
62 

Roy L. Hunt, Mill Creek. Ind. Local 
1236 

Raymond H. Diamond, New Brighton, 
Pa. Local 422 

Gus Binckie, Rye, N.Y. Local 77 

Howard Brackenbury, Syracuse, N.Y. 
Local 12 

Ronald W. Estry, Marlboro, Mass. 
Local 860 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis Senior, New 
Brighton, Pa. Local 422 

Mr. & Mrs. John Talamo, N.Y. Local 
754 

Mr. Adolph Werner, Detroit, Mich. 
Local 1433 

John Kirst, Bay Village, Local 182 

Andrew G. Schutz, Shelter Island, N.Y. 
Local 1640 

Frank A. Cellitti, Sunbury, Pa. Local 
838 

Fred Niederberger, Boylston. Mass. 
Local 988 

Raymond Totten, Milltown, N.J. Local 
1006 

John Stenvall, Berkeley, Calif. Local 
642 

Mr. & Mrs. John Rantala, Lantana, 
Fla. 

Alwin, Beuerle, Manchester, Mich. 
Local 512 

Mr. & Mrs. Leo Zuccato, Detroit, 
Mich. Local 1513 

John Aigelinger, Syracuse, N.Y. Local 
12 

Swan O. Monson, St. Paul, Minn. 
Local 87 

Eric J. DeLamartee, Bath, Mich. Local 
1449 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



Li' 



George L. Lewis, Champaign, 111. 
Local 44 

George Keinrich, Middletown, Conn. 
Local 97 

Richard Dahms, Toledo, Ohio. Local 
1393 

Stanley Chalk, Baltimore, Md. Local 
101 

Russell Battle, Detroit, Mich. Local 
982 

Thos. A. Carmichael, Atlanta, Ga. 
Local 225 

C. Oscar Freeburg, Cambridge, Minn. 
Local 851 

Robert A. McClure, Dayton, Ohio. 
Local 104 

Walter Moellmer, Denver, Colo. Local 
55 

Frederick M. Gorman & Wife, Bell- 
wood, III. Local 1 

Mike David, Winfield, 111. Local 705 

Victor B. Mathias, Springfield, 111. 
Local 16 

Clarence W. Evans, Springfield, 111. 
Local 16 

Mr. & Mrs. George Herrgott, New- 
portville, Pa. Local 972 

George L. Klein, Glen Cove, N.Y. 
Local 1093 

Joseph W. Klein, Glen Head, N.Y. 
Local 1093 

Frank Stanek, Decatur, Mich. Local 
297 

Mr. & Mrs. John Bird, Phila., Pa. 
Local 8 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Kuder, Hunting- 
ton St., N.Y. Local 1292 

Mr. & Mrs. Frank G. Whittaker, 
Brigantine, N.J. 

Mr. & Mrs. Dewey H. Ramsey, Car- 
neys Point, N.J. Local 1202 

Fred Hucke, Schenectady, N.Y. Local 
146 

Frederick Hucke, Schenectady, N.Y. 
Local 146 

Richard A. King, Lincoln, Nebr. Local 
1055 

Mr. & Mrs. Chet Wesseldine, Clinton, 
N.Y. Local 125 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence Wheeler, Odessa, 
Del. Local 626 



NEWS 



Mr. & Mrs. George Babarock, Sterling 
Heights, Mich. Local 26 

Paul Fuller, Sarasota, Fla. Local 824 

Mr. & Mrs. George Colburn, Branford, 
Conn. Local 79 

Mr. & Mrs. O. C. Beeson, Summit- 
ville, Ind. 

Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Hanold, Summit- 
ville, Ind. 

Alvin Johnson, Sarasota, Fla. Local 58 

Holgen Backstrom, Chicago, 111 Local 
58 

Emil Loisel, Detroit, Mich. Local 337 

Andrew W. Saslow, Boston, Mass. 
Local 40 

George V. Dodson, Hood Park, N.Y. 
Local 791 

Lisly Geodovin, New Port Richie, Fla. 
Local 488 

Emil Hirschberg, Buffalo, N.Y. Local 
9 

Valentin Sandberg, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Local 787 

Mr. & Mrs. John H. Stahl, Phoenix, 
Ariz. Local 2093 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter Schildroth, Tra- 
verse City, Mich. Local 1461 

Mr. & Mrs. Gust Savola, Duluth, Minn. 
Local 361 

Homer J. Bombard, Syracuse, N.Y. 
Local 12 

George Grueggemein, Cleveland, Ohio 
Local 1643 

Richard Kleve, Clearwater, Fla. Local 
1275 

Mr. & Mrs. Albert Baker, Sr., Buffalo. 
N.Y. Local 440 

Mr. Charles W. Lewis, Pontiac, Mich. 

Mr. & Mrs. Neil Dawson, Tupperville, 
Ont., Canada 

Chas. E. Koomans, Hackensack, N.J., 
Local 15 

Mr. & Mrs. Ed Ward, Trenton, N.J., 
Local 31 

Percy G. Aldrich, Pompton Lakes, 
N.J., Local 15 

Harold Marcussen, Richmond, Va., 
Local 388 

Henry C. Klein, Amityville, N.Y., 
Local 1164 



LAMINATE SCRIBER 




Johnde Brewer of Local 106, Dcs Moines, 
la., has a patent pending on the laminate 
scriber shown in the accompanying illustra- 
tion, and he is offering it at a suggested re- 
tail price of $9.95. 

The tool is not a linoleum scriber with a 
needle, but a heavy carbide cutting tool. It 
scribes Hush to side or top and does the 
job of expensive routers. Brewer states. You 
set the tool, score, and snap plastic laminates 
up. then finish with a milling file. It has an 
adjusting nut for bevel top facing. For in- 
formation, write: Brewer Products Co.. P.O. 
Box 3241, East 14th Street Station, Des 
Moines, Iowa 50316. 



NH1MU 
CONSTMCTION 

ESTIMATOR ! 



COSTS 

1969 UNIT COSTS 

COMPILED FROM 

I THE RECORDS OF 

HUNDREDS OF 

CONTRACTORS 

AND MATERIAL 

SUPPLIERS 



208 Pages 

8V4 » 11 

NO ADVERTISING 



• ACCURATE BUILDING COSTS 
IN DOLLARS AND CENTS 

• AVERAGE LABOR COSTS FOR 
THOUSANDS OF ITEMS 

• TYPICAL SUBCONTRACT 
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• NEW ESTIMATING RULES 
OF THUMB 



Send for FREE Building Books Catalog 



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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 


Audel, Theodore 


.. 18 




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27 

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Cline-Sigmon. Publishers .... 


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Estwing Manufacturing 


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Irwin Auger Bit Co 


Lee, H. D 


25 


Locksmilhing Institute 


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North American School of 






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37 
Cover 


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Union Industries Show 


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39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Gear Social Security Benefits To The Cost of Living 



■ From newspaper stories and press releases 
by high government officials it seems probable that 
the Social Security system will get considerable 
attention in the current session of Congress. A 
wide variety of bills for amending the basic law 
have already been introduced. 

The Social Security Act has been amended from 
time to time over the past 30 years, but there has 
been no major overhaul. Now there seems to be 
a good deal of agitation for a complete rewriting 
of the program. 

Whenever Congress begins tinkering with a pro- 
gram, there is always danger that it will be made 
worse rather than better. This does not exclude 
the present situation in Social Security. 

There are those who want to scrap the insurance 
concept which prevails in the current Social Se- 
curity program. Instead, they want to substitute 
some sort of reverse income tax system, which 
would depend on annual appropriations by Con- 
gress rather than on a trust fund maintained by 
contributions from employers and employees. 

A step in this direction was taken a few years 
ago when certain minimum payments to oldsters 
who never worked in covered employment were 
included. This was a first step in the direction of 
making Social Security a kind of welfare payment 
rather than a pension bought and paid for by an 
employee during his working years. 

Now there are individuals, mostly college pro- 
fessors, who want to eliminate the insurance con- 
cept entirely. It seems to me this would be a grave 
mistake. 

A worker, under the present system, substan- 



tially pays for his Social Security pension during 
his working years. The fact that he also gets pro- 
tection for his family in the event he dies before 
reaching retirement age is a plus factor. To take 
away from him the satisfaction of knowing that 
he is paying for his pension would be a serious 
mistake, in my judgment. 

Most workers want to feel they are paying their 
way. They want to know that they have earned 
what they are getting. I do not see how any nega- 
tive income tax program could differentiate be- 
tween the man who worked hard all during his 
working years and the man who contributed very 
little. Both would draw benefits because of age 
rather than what they contributed to the nation 
during their working years. 

I believe the primary need for improving the 
existing Social Security program is to gear pensions 
to the cost of living, or better yet, to the increasing 
standard of living. A man who works for 40 or 
45 years building the nation and adding to its 
wealth certainly earns the right to spend his de- 
clining years in some degree of reasonable com- 
fort. The problem now is that every time Social 
Security benefits are increased, the escalating cost 
of living soon eats up the increase. 

It is the position of the AFL-CIO that, first, 
there should be a substantial increase in existing 
Social Security pensions and that, second, pensions 
should be tied to living costs so that there would 
be automatic adjustments to compensate for in- 
creased living costs. To me, this makes sense. 

When and if Congress decides to overhaul the 
Social Security system, I hope the labor movement 
can unite in pushing such a program. ■ 



40 



THE CARPENTER 



Pill! I 





^^enturies ago in England before an apprentice could 
become a master he had to prepare a test piece of work 
or a "masterpiece" for submittal to the rigid inspection 
of a group of masters of his craft. If the test piece passed 
muster, he gained status as a free man, no longer inden- 
tured to a master under whom he had worked and studied. 

Today building trades unions follow carefully planned 
and proved programs of apprenticeship training. By the 
time a young man is ready to receive his journeyman's 
card, he is able to produce first class work in his chosen 
trade. In some situations, he is still asked to produce a 
test piece of workmanship. For the most part, however, 
his training has been so basic and thorough that a future 
employer and the buying public can rely on his ability to 
do good work and to exhibit the abilities and skills which 
are in the great tradition of the masters of craftsmanship. 



The saw with two bases... 
the Stanley Eager Beaver 





Model 90250 $69.50 

Two bases? Nobody ever thought of it be- 
fore . . . but with two bases, whether you cut 
with the blade to the left or to the right, the 
base is always supported while the blade is 
outboard. A trigger for each base controls 
the % h.p. full ball and needle bearing re- 
versible motor. The 4%" diameter, two-way 
blade cuts up to VAs", perfect for counter 
tops, paneling, trim and plastic laminates. 






About 6 lbs. lighter than any ordinary 
builder's saw, the Stanley Eager Beaver is 
faster than any sabre saw, as accurate as a 
back saw in a mitre box. Try the Eager 
Beaver at your distributor or write Stanley 
Power Tools, Division 
of the Stanley Works, 
New Britain, Connec- 
ticut 06050. helps you do things right 



STANLEY 



P.S. Made by the same Stanley that makes the finest hand tools 



The 



MAY, 1969 




NT 



Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



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^~ -A 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 
M. A. HUTCHESON 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building, 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento, California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovttch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 



M. A. 
R. E. 



Hutcheson, Chairman 
Livingston, Secretary 




Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



<3£jMP 





VOLUME LXXXIX 



No. 5 



May, 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick. Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

New National Softwood Lumber Standards 2 

California Carpenter Visits Brazil 4 

How Did the Name 'Carpenter' Originate? 7 

If You Really Care About Government 8 

Secretary of Labor Schultz on Manpower 10 

3200 U.S. Citizens Can Claim a Century of Memories 12 

Major Construction Project in Headquarter's Front Yard 15 

Congress Urged to Restore Fair Income Tax Structure 17 

1969 Apprenticeship Contests 27 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 6 

Canadian Report Morden Lazarus 1 8 

We Congratulate 20 

Local Union News 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Soetz 23 

Plane Gossip 25 

What's New in Apprenticeship 28 

Service to the Brotherhood 30 

Of Interest to our Industrial Locals 31 

In Memoriam 35 

What's News? 37 

Lakeland News 38 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on form 3579 should bo sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' Building. 101 Constitution Ave.. N.W.. Washington, 0. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave.. N.E.. Washington. D. C. 20013, by the U 
Brotherhood of Carpentcs and Joiners of America. Second class posrage paid at Washington. 
D. C. Subscription price: Unitea States and Canada $2 PC tesr. single copies 20s in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Torrents of spring rush down the 
Brown River past an old red mill near 
Jericho. Vermont. A mill pond, filled 
by springs high in the Green Moun- 
tains, overflows into the rocky spill- 
way, and water cascades toward the 
plains and valleys beyond. 

The mill is located only a few miles 
south of Mount Mansfield, the high- 
est point in the state, according to H. 
Armstrong Roberts Photo Agency, 
which supplied us with this excellent 
cover picture. 

The old mill may be recognized by 
some of our readers. It appeared on 
the front cover of our magazine once 
before. In November. 1964, we 
showed the sturdy old structure sur- 
rounded by autumn foliage. The rush- 
ing waters had receded, and New 
England was preparing for winter. 

Many old mills of the Eastern Sea- 
board were centers of industry in 
early America. Grist mills and saw 
mills harnessed the water power 
which flowed down the slopes of the 
Appalachian Chain, and towns grew 
up around mill ponds and mill yards. 

There was usually a mill dam, and 
the fishing was good in the mill pond. 
In the summer, when the waters were 
not swift flowing, boys could dive into 
the cool waters and swim till ex- 
hausted. In the winter, when the 
pond froze over, there was ice hockey 
and skating parties. Poets wrote lyrical 
verse about such mills and ponds of 
yesteryear. 




AT LAST! 

A New National Softwoo* 

Industry-proposed standards fa 



New standards would . . . 

• make green and dry sizes 
compatible, 

• simplify names, grades, and 
strength values, 

• eliminate all fractional in- 
use sizes to quarter and half- 
inch modules to be compatible 
with other materials. 

■ All major segments of the lum- 
ber industry have finally agreed 
upon an understandable, enforce- 
able national softwood lumber 
standard for controlling the quality 
and the performance of lumber in 
the market place. 

The three major lumber grading 
agencies agreed in mid-October on 
details of a National Lumber Stand- 
ard for Structural Lumber which 
has subsequently been approved by 
the American Lumber Standards 
Committee and now rests in the 
hands of the U.S. Department of 
Commerce for review and submis- 
sion to an acceptor list. 



The three grading agencies are 
the Southern Pine Inspection Bu- 
reau, West Coast Lumber Inspec- 
tion Bureau and the Western Wood 
Products Association. 

The proposed National Lumber 
Standard will replace present over- 
lapping grading and marking sys- 
tems with one standard for all soft- 
wood dimension manufacturers in 
all areas of the country. 

In addition to the three rules- 
writing agencies, the proposed 
standard has the support of the 
California Redwood Association, 
Northern Hardwood & Pine Manu- 
facturers Association, Northeastern 
Lumber Manufacturers Association, 
Fir and Hemlock Door Association, 
National Forest Products Associa- 
tion, National Lumber & Building 
Materials Dealers Association, Red 
Cedar Shingle & Handsplit Shake 
Bureau, Southern Pine Association 
and the Western Red Cedar Lumber 
Association. 

Principal provisions of the new 
lumber standard are simplification 



Industry spokesmen call standon 



THE CARPENTER 



imber Standard 




al consideration by US Department of Commerce 



of grade designations and nomen- 
clature, establishment of a national 
size system providing for both green 
and dry lumber to be manufactured 
to the same in-use sizes, provides 
for combining and simplifying 
strength and stiffness values for 
wood of similar qualities and estab- 
lishment of an independent board 
of review for enforcement, and 
designation of actual lumber sizes 
on manufacturers' invoices. 

The proposed standard will lead 
to a substantial reduction in the 
number of grade and species de- 
scriptions. All species will be desig- 
nated by the same grade and name 
system. Also, not only will green 
and dry lumber be compatible in 
size when put in place in their end- 
use, but both will now be compatible 
with timber sizes as well. 

The ALSC plans to ask the Fed- 
eral Trade Commission to require 
mandatory grade marking of all 
structural lumber under the new 
standard. The proposal also pro- 
vides for establishment of a paid 



board of review which will act in 
a capacity to police grade marking. 
The enforcement activity will be a 
matter of public record as opposed 
to past policy where board of re- 
view findings were unavailable. 

The standard, as a consumer 
benefit, is likened by industry 
spokesmen to a "truth in packag- 
ing" bill for the lumber industry. 
The standard provides, for the first 
time, for required National Bureau 
of Standards approval of strength 
and stiffness values for consumer 
protection. 

The new standard, by making 
green and dry sizes compatible in 
end-use, is seen as a boon to build- 
ers and designers because it will 
make structures go together faster 
and more uniformly. The massive 
simplification of names and grades 
and strength values will also make 
it easier to order the right wood for 
the job. 

The standard provides for elimi- 
nation of all fractional-in-use sizes 
to quarter and half inch modules to 



be compatible with other materials. 

It is estimated that the reduced 
bulk provided through the smaller 
sizes will result in substantial freight 
savings. 

Manufacturers report that by 
standardizing their product, it will 
become more competitive in the 
market place, thereby directly bene- 
fiting all who distribute it or build 
with it. 

The proposed national sizes for 
both green and dry lumber, along 
with the nominal sizes, are shown 
below: 



Nominal 


Green 


Dry 


1 


25 32 


% 


2 


1-9/16 


1-VS 


3 


2-9/ 1 6 


2-Vi 


4 


3-9/16 


3-'i 


5 


4-5/8 


4-' 2 


6 


5- s /8 


5-' 2 


8 


7-'^ 


1-Va 


10 


M-'; 


9-' 4 


i: 


1 I- 1 2 


II- 1 . 



truth in packaging bill" tor the lumber industry 



MAY, t 9 6 9 



CALIFORNIA CARPENTER VISITS 




UNDER UNION-TO-UNION PROGRAM 



by ANTHONY L. RAMOS 

Executive Secretary-Treasurer of the California State Council of 
Carpenters discusses working conditions of Brazilian carpenters 

Mr. Ramos toured Brazil for three weeks last September as a represent- 
ative of the United Brotherhood and under the auspices of the U.S. State 
Department's Agency for International Development. He visited the cities 
of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Brazilia, Belo Horizonte, and a number of 
smaller towns located roughly within a 600 mile radius of Rio. 

His time in Brazil was spent in an intensively programmed series of con- 
ferences and visitations. Over 60 interviews were held with U.S. Govern- 
ment representatives, trade union leaders, Brazilian government officials in- 
volved with labor problems, and elected governmental officials. 

Traveling with Mr. Ramos was William Levine of New York, a vice 
president of the United Association. Together, they formed the first team 
of building trades union representatives to take part in the program. 




■ Brazil is a country which will 
have growing significance for the 
United States in the decades immedi- 
ately ahead. 

Its territory comprises almost one 
half the land mass of South America. 
It has a population of 86 million 
and untold reserves of mineral re- 
sources. It has great cities (Rio de 
Janeiro, 4 million — Sao Paulo, 4.5 
million) with the most modern 
buildings and up-to-date skylines, 
tremendous industrial development; 
and the most abject poverty for 
many of its people. 

The stated purpose of the Union- 
to-Union Program of the State De- 
partment is to develop better under- 
standing. 

I have made no attempt here to 
describe the warm hospitality of the 
people, the unique beauty of the 
city and harbor of Rio de Janeiro, 
the tremendous pace of industrial 
development in Sao Paulo, or of the 
many incidents and adventures that 
occurred during the trip. I will re- 
strict my comment to what I con- 



sider the salient factors involving 
the trade union movement in Brazil 
at this time. 

Unfortunately, it would appear 
that at the present time American 
labor organizations and those of 
Brazil have very little in common as 
far as the environment in which they 
function. I cite some contrasts: 
American trade unions operate with 
a minimum of interference from gov- 
ernment and have the right to strike 
as a basic element in the collective 
bargaining arena. Brazilian trade un- 
ions, for example, have almost no 
negotiating function in relation to 
wages. Wages are set by the govern- 
ment and its Labor Courts. Unions 
in Brazil do not have the right to 
strike in support of demands for im- 
proved wages. The right to strike is 
usable only in relation to enforce- 
ment of existing wage agreements 
and the collection of back wages. As 
one might expect in such a situation, 
wages are incredibly low. Carpen- 
ters and other building tradesmen, 
for example, in the highly urban 



areas of Rio de Janerio and Sao 
Paulo are paid only 270 an hour. 

American trade unions are free to 
engage in political activity; the con- 
trary is the case in Brazil. Brazilian 
unions are by law denied the right 
to participate in politics. Brazilian 
labor law was modeled on the fascist 
corporate state pattern back in 1937 
under the Presidency of Getulio 
Vargas and remains so to this day. 

Edward Kramer, Vice President 
of the AFL-CIO International La- 
dies Garment Workers, who visited 
Brazil on a similar mission stated 
recently : 

"With the right to strike banned 
and collective bargaining nullified by 
the control of the Labor Courts, the 
Brazilian unions have very little to 
offer the workers." 

What makes the situation even 
more difficult, is that almost with- 
out exception the leaders of Brazil- 
ian trade unions are at the same time 
employees of the Federal or State 
Government and representatives of 
their unions. As a result of their ap- 



THE CARPENTER 



RIGHT: Anthony Ramos demonstrating his nail- 
driving ability to two Brazilian officials and a 
Brazilian carpenter. 

BELOW: Ramos; Richard E. Ginnola labor at- 
tache, U.S. Embassy, Rio de Janerio; and William 
Levine, Executive Board Member, United Associ- 
ation of Plumbers and Pipe Fitters, at Brazilia, 
the Nation's capital. 





ABOVE: A Brazilian carpenter, a Brazil- 
ian interpreter, and Anthony Ramos dis- 
cussing working conditions in both of their 
countries. 



pointment to paying state and fed- 
eral jobs, almost all of them are in 
some degree under the control of the 
Ministry of Labor. 

The reason Brazilian trade union 
leaders accept appointments as gov- 
ernment officials is because the gov- 
ernment regulates the budgets of the 
unions. A union in most instances 
cannot pay a decent salary to its rep- 
resentative. 

What one finds in Brazil is a la- 
bor movement which is controlled 
from top to bottom by government. 
The essence of the matter is that the 
Brazilian labor confederations really 
are not free. The Brazilian govern- 
ment maintains almost total control 
over the working people of that 
country, both organized and un- 
organized. 

How is this control used? 

An official unclassified document 
of the U.S. Department of State 
dated October 25. 1966 which was 
furnished, as background material, 
to the team states: 

"Salary Laws 4725, 4330, 4403 



and Decree Law 15 have had the 
effect of decreasing' real wages and 
eliminating the trade union negotia- 
tive function by requiring all wage 
increases to be established by Gov- 
ernment and the Labor Courts. 
Other laws have limited the right to 
strike. . . ." 

It is very difficult to carry on a 
meaningful dialogue on union affairs 
without getting into the realm of col- 
lective bargaining, strikes, boycotts, 
grievances, pickets, etc. Yet. these 
things are virtually all denied to un- 
ions in Brazil. What then does one 
say to encourage his Brazilian 
Brother? Does one suggest. "Why 
don't you defy your government?" 
One could say, "You should become 
politically active and change your 
government." But. political activity 
is denied to unions in Brazil. 

After meeting with a number of 
labor union representatives. I was 
impressed that many of them were 
sincere and were trying to do the 
best job they could under the cir- 
cumstances. 



In summary, it is my belief that 
the policies of the present regime in 
Brazil will not permit the growth of 
a vigorous trade union movement, 
which could serve to advance the 
social and economic adjustments 
necessary to improve the standard 
of living for the great number of 
people who are presently in abject 
poverty. On the other hand, the 
present regime does not provide, or 
even permit the kind of political 
activity which could result in elect- 
ing a government that would ener- 
getically develop and institute the 
kind of reforms necessary. 

In retrospect, one thing that was 
gained from this experience was an 
appreciation of the importance of 
maintaining a free labor movement 
here in the United States, one in 
which governmental control and in- 
terference is kept at an absolute 
minimum. Only through such a labor 
movement can working people have 
any assurance that they will earn a 
fair share of the wealth that is 
created by their labor. ■ 



MAY, 1969 




TOM 




ROUNDUP 



CONGRESS MOVES SLOWLY— The 91st Congress has made very little progress so far on 
the basic social and economic legislation supported by the AFL-CIO. The House of 
Representatives may act on extension of the important Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act in April. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany has given testimony to congressional commit- 
tees in support of full employment policies, lower interest rates to stimulate 
housing construction, loophole-closing tax reform, and direct popular election of 
the President and Vice President. 

President Meany warned that high int 
tion economic policies "present the dange 
rising unemployment." 

"The notion that there is an inevita 
tion and unemployment is economically fal 
President Meany declared. 

"A rise in unemployment would hit th 
most recently hired, the least skilled, p 
young workers. Working people generally- 
ticular — would be forced to pay the price 
of family incomes for such a policy." 



erest rates and other Nixon Administra- 
r of a sharp economic slow-down and 

ble, mechanical trade-off between infla- 
se and loaded with social dynamite," 

e most vulnerable workers hardest— the 
articularly Negroes, other minorities and 
-and the most vulnerable workers in par- 
in unemployment and substantial losses 



ON THE BRIGHT SIDE, the President and the National Alliance of Businessmen, 
formed to provide jobs for hard-core unemployed, have received pledges of 111,000 
jobs by mid-April of this year, and, NAB states, "labor unions, the Urban Coali- 
tion and other groups have joined in a crusade to give the words 'full employment' 
a new meaning. " 

MAJOR INDUSTRY NEGOTIATIONS-More than 800 contracts covering more than 4,000,000 
workers will be open this year for negotiation in major U. S. industries, says the 
March issue of "The- American Federationist . " The industries include aluminum, 
steel, aerospace, airline, communications, and men's clothing. Many additional 
contracts covering less than 1,000 workers each will also come up during the year 
for negotiation or reopening on bread-and-butter issues. 

DRUG COMBINATIONS— Labor has hailed Food and Drug Administration head, Dr. 
Herbert Ley, Jr. , for moving to clear "fixed combination" drugs from the market. 

The FDA set a 30-day deadline for drug manufacturers to prove the safety 
of certain drug combinations in the treatment of diseases for which they are 
prescribed. 

AFL-CIO Legislative Director Andrew J. Biemiller noted there "are 78 prod- 
ucts which panels of the National Academy of Sciences — National Research Council 
have found dangerous as well as ineffective." 



HANDICAPPED STATUS— The Labor Department has class if ed drug addicts and law 
offenders as "handicapped persons" and included them in manpower programs in an 
effort to help them find jobs and rehabilitate themselves. 

Secretary of Labor George Shultz has issued new guidelines which will make 
drug addicts and law offenders eligible for special services in the same way that 
physically handicapped persons are now helped. The original code was established 
in 1930. In 1963 mentally retarded persons were added to the program and in 
1966, alcoholics. 



THE CARPENTER 




How did the name 'carpenter' originate? 

Reprinted from the February, 1892, issue of The Carpenter. 



■ How did the name "carpenter" 
originate? 

In order to tell how the term orig- 
inated, it is necessary to tell when 
and where it originated. Our word 
carpenter is from the old French 
word "Charpentier." 

This term or name was used by 
the Franks, a warlike race, out of 
which the French nation in part was 
formed, and from which France was 
named. The old French derived the 
word from the low or later Latin 
word, "Carpentarius" — wagon or 
chariot maker. 

In time of war the Roman armies 
took with them wagons or chariots; 
also wagon-makers to repair the 
chariots. These men were skilled 
woodworkers and were employed to 
build houses for the armies wherever 
they spent the winter or established 
a post. 

When the Romans were among 
the Franks, the Franks would see 
them framing bridges and at work- 
on houses more frequently than on 
anything else, and would hear the 
Romans call them "Carpentarius" 
and would thus learn to use the term 
in a different way from what the 
Latins did. 

The Latins saw their wagonmak- 
ers at work on a house, bridge or 
boat, and they would call them 
"Carpentarius," while the Franks, 
hearing the men called by this name 
and seeing them at work on houses 
and other frame structures, would 



learn to call a man who constructed 
any heavy frame work out of wood 
a "Carpentarius." 

The old French dropped the 
Latin ending of the word, "ius," and 
changed the long "a" into "ie" and 
thus was formed the old French 
word, "Charpentier." 

This word, with its old French 
meaning, passed into the Anglo- 
Saxon, and at a later date was angli- 
cized by dropping the "h" and the 
"i" of the last syllable, and so we 
have the English word "carpenter," 
which in its strictest sense, means, 
as shown above, a framer, one who 
makes heavy frame structures. 

Thus far we have traced the word 
down the ages to the time when it 
received the present English mean- 
ing, and beyond that time into the 
Latin, and have shown that it came 
out of the Latin, through the old 
French into the English. It remains 
still to remark that the word origi- 
nated outside of the Latin tongue. 
The Latin derived it from the Celtic 
word, "Carruca," a word used by 
the Celts as the name of a two-wheel 
cart. The word appears to have 
been original with the Celts. The 
Celtic race in ancient times occu- 
pied central and western Europe. 
Their descendents now occupy Ire- 
land. Wales. Highland. Scotland, 
and the north of France. 

What did the word mean in the 
time of Christ? 

The word was not known to the 
civilized world in the time of Christ. 



if, indeed, it had any existence in 
His day. The word for carpenter 
in Mark VI. 3, is "Tekrar (teknon). 
It is better rendered by our word, 
"mechanic," since the term is ap- 
plied to a skillful workman. 

It is known that the foster father 
of Jesus was a worker in wood such 
as we in this western country would 
call a carpenter. This information 
is gathered from writings outside of 
the New Testament. 

Joseph, being a carpenter, would, 
under the ordinary rules in his day 
be obliged to teach Jesus the same 
trade. In Christ's time it was a dis- 
honor to a Jew to be without a 
trade. 

It had been said for centuries, 
and was believed among the Jews 
that "He who brings up a son with- 
out a trade, brings up a son to be- 
come a thief." After the boy reached 
manhood he was free to follow what 
he pleased. 

The Hebrew word for carpenter 
is — in Hebrew letters — (charash). 
It is applied to several classes of 
skilled workmen. It means a me- 
chanic. 

When the word is used, some 
other word is used with it to show 
what the person spoken of works in. 
whether of gold, silver, wood or 
iron. The same is true of the Latin. 
They saw "faber — nanius" (wood). 
a mechanic in wood, "faber aur- 
rarius" a mechanic in gold. etc. 
"Faber" means a fabricator, or 
maker of anything. ■ 



M A Y , 



969 



If you really care 



ABOUT BETTER GOVERNMEft 



■ If you are concerned about higher taxes, con- 
sumer protection, on-the-job safety — or any of a hun- 
dred vital issues facing our nation today — then the 
Carpenters Legislative Improvement Committee de- 
serves your support. 

Your Brotherhood's own organization for building 
better government, CLIC, is designed to protect your 
best interests and the welfare of your family. Almost 



1- 



every day of the week a Brotherhood staff member 
represents you and your interests in Congressional 
hearings, legislative meetings and personal discus- 
sions with our government's decision makers on 
Capitol Hill. 

CLIC is your organization and it is supported by 
your individual donations. The extent of work per- 
formed in the area of political action depends largely 
on the extent of your aid. Because member donations 
are funneled directly into CLIC, every dollar given 
does a full dollar's work. With every member of the 
Brotherhood doing his share, great strides in legisla- 
tive improvement can be made. 

The watchword of the Nixon Administration is "Lis- 
ten." But there are many voices seeking to be heard. 

Federal law prohibits the use of union funds for 
political activity on the Federal level. Therefore, it is 
necessary for us to have an organization such as 
CLIC through which members can voluntarily con- 
tribute their dollars to enable our Brotherhood to 
effectively represent our best interests on Capitol Hill. 
The business interests and the foes of organized labor 
have swarms of lobbyists constantly pressuring Con- 
gress for legislation designed to hamstring the rights 
of unions. We must have representation to counteract 
their efforts. 

We must use every opportunity to see that our needs 
are made known and kept before our lawmakers, and 
that our job interests are considered and understood 
by Congressional committees and by the many rule- 
making and administrative bureaus of the Department 
of Labor. This takes time; this takes manpower; this 
takes money. Your money can provide the manpower 
to spend the time to provide this representation we 
need in Washington. 

Our industry and our Brotherhood face a crucial 
period in the coming months and years. It is imperative 
that those who make the decisions in the Conaress 







/V 



THEN CONTRIBUTE TO CLIC 



know and understand the problems that face our 
Brotherhood and the construction industry as a whole. 

Almost 7,000 bills already have been introduced 
for consideration by the 91st Congress. Many of them 
have very serious implications for organized labor, and 
it is vital that they be defeated. Among the anti-labor 
bills now before the Congress are bills to further re- 
strict the right of labor organizations to discipline 
members who defy legitimate authority, bills to elimi- 
nate the NLRB and to substitute therefore a labor 
court, bills to make unions subject to anti-trust laws, 
and bills to deny rank and file members an opportunity 
to vote on an agreement accepted by its negotiating 
committee. The list of bills aimed at reducing the ef- 
fectiveness of unions would fill several pages. We 
must see that these bills are exposed for the anti-union 
measures they are. 

We have a stake in achieving positive legislation, 
too. Being considered is the Situs Picketing amend- 
ment to the Taft-Hartley Act. This has been a prime 
objective of the AFL-CIO Building and Constuction 
Trades Departmemt for some time. Also, bills have 
been introduced which would nullify the so-called 
"right-to-work" laws which exist in several states, 
through repeal of Section 14(b) of Taft-Hartley Act. 

Bills which may affect your safety while on the job 
are also up for consideration soon. It is important 
that Congress knows of our need for measures set 
forth in the pending Construction Safety bill, and the 
Occupational Health and Safety bill. Standards to 
assure safe and healthful working conditions would 
be set up under provisions of these proposed laws. 

Extension of provisions of the Davis-Bacon Act is 
needed to gain compliance in the construction and re- 
conditioning of Post Offices and other government 
owned or leased buildings, and to permit prevailing 
wage provisions of the act to include subsistence allow- 
ances. Several bills are pending which would enhance 
the value of existing Davis-Bacon legislation. 

We are concerned, too, about the log export situa- 
tion and lumber pricing, and bills have been intro- 
duced to benefit American lumber users. The Car- 
penters' stake in bills pertaining to lumber and timber 



reserves must be made known. Contributions to CLIC 
can make this possible. 

The construction of more than 500,000 homes for 
needy families next year, and the building and re- 
habilitating of 26 million living units in the next dec- 
ade is, of course, important to our membership. The 
efforts of our government in the areas of Housing and 
Urban Development must reflect sound construction 
techniques and policies. Our representatives in Wash- 
ington will insist on high standards in these programs. 

As consumers and heads of households, we are also 
deeply concerned about the progress of consumer leg- 
islation, and several bills have been introduced to im- 
plement and strengthen measures which would protect 
the consumer. We will have to fight for passage of 
these favorable bills, just as we will have to fight 
against passage of the Uniform Consumer Credit Code, 
which would nullify gains won in the last Congress in 
the Truth-in-Lending Act. 

Tax reform is vital so that we need pay only our fair 
share of running our government, and see that others 
— the rich and the privileged — pay their fair share, 
too. Our voices must be heard so that promises of tax 
equity for all will not be left unfulfilled. 

Our most effective tool in changing our legislative 
needs into action is CLIC, and now is the most effec- 
tive time to make these needs known . . . while gov- 
ernment policies are being formulated, in time to pre- 
pare our case before congressional hearings, and with 
a strong voice to rally support for our causes in the 
halls of Congress. 

It doesn't take much to make CLIC work for you. 
But it will take your $1 or $10 contribution now. 




What Do You Think Of These? 

Carl M. Halverson, President of the Associated 
General Contractors, last month proposed to (he AFL- 
CIO Building and Construction Trades Department 
that a "no strike; no lockout" agreement containing 
the following provisions, among others, he entered 
into: 

1. Wages on all government construction contracts 
should he settled In arbitration. 

2. Skilled manpower should he used only to perform 
skilled work. 

3. Relaxation of standards on apprenticeship training. 

There already is some sentiment among a few 
reactionary Congressmen for legislation along these 
lines. That a legislative hattle may eventually develop 
on these items is not beyond the realm of possibility. 



MAY, 1969 



MANPOWER AGENCY OVERHAULED 
BY LABOR SECRETARY SHULTZ 

New administration's organizational 

reshuffle does not affect 

Bureau of Apprenticeship & Training 



■ Much to the relief of many trade 
unions, including the United Brother- 
hood, the recent reorganization of the 
U.S. Labor Department's Manpower 
Administration has left the Bureau of 
Apprenticeship & Training intact. 

The organizational reshuffle in no 
way affects BAT. The Bureau is re- 
tained without modification and its 
reporting responsibilities, structure, 
function and relationship to the field 
remain unchanged. 

President Nixon described the gen- 
eral reorganization as one of the first 
steps to "eliminate duplication, to con- 
solidate functions, to bring better man- 
agement to all areas of the federal 
government." 

"If there is one area of government 
that should serve as a model for the 
best use of manpower, it is the Man- 
power Administration," the Chief Ex- 
ecutive said. 

"Accordingly, the Secretary of La- 
bor has moved quickly to overhaul 
and to modernize operations of this 
$2-billion-a-year agency." 

A Single Line of Authority 

President Nixon said the new Man- 
power Administration would decen- 



tralize its functions. A single line of 
authority from Washington to the field 
will be established and regional offices 
will assume greater responsibility. 

One phase of the reorganization — 
that related to the Job Corps — has 
stirred a real controvery on Capitol 
Hill and in parts of the trade union 
movement. A vigorous attempt is un- 
derway to prevent the slash of many 
Job Corps centers and programs. 

According to the Labor Depart- 
ment, the reorganization separates the 
Office of the Assistant Secretary of 
Labor for Manpower from the Office 
of the Manpower Administrator. With 
responsibility for operational manage- 
ment of ongoing programs, the Man- 
power Administrator will report to 
the Assistant Secretary. 

A Consolidated Staff 

Regional Manpower Administrators 
and the D.C. Manpower Administra- 
tor will be responsible for administer- 
ing the full range of Manpower serv- 
ices, including the development and 
execution of training contracts, to meet 
the needs of the states, local com- 
munities and other client groups. They 
will direct a consolidated staff which 




Labor Sec'y George Shultz 



has been part of the field offices of 
the Bureau of Employment Security 
and the Bureau of Work-Training 
Programs. 

A single new component, the U.S. 
Training and Employment Service 
(USTES) will handle all employment, 
work-experience and training programs 
that are the responsibility of the Labor 
Department. USTES combines the 
major program activities of the pres- 
ent U.S. Employment Service and the 
Bureau of Work-Training Programs. 
The new component also will adminis- 
ter such programs as on-the-job train- 
ing under the Manpower Development 
and Training Act and Apprenticeship 
Outreach. 

"The Bureau of Apprenticeship and 
Training remains unchanged," said the 
order of Labor Secretary George P. 
Shultz, which was effective as of 
March 17. 



An Editorial 



These Are Victims Of, Not Contributors To, Inflation 



■ As President Nixon tackles the tremendous problem 
of stemming inflation and balancing the budget, he seems 
to be moving in the direction of penalizing at least one 
group that can ill afford it — those getting Social Security 
benefits. 

Before he left office, President Johnson recommended 
raising Social Security taxes from 9.6 to 10.4%. Coupled 
with this increase in Social Security taxes, President John- 
son also proposed a 10% increase in Social Security 
benefits. 

Now President Nixon proposes to keep the increase in 
Social Security taxes, but at the same time he proposes 
reducing the increase in benefits from 10% to 7%. In- 
stead of an additional $1.6 billion going to Social Security 
recipients, the Nixon proposal would trim the increase 
to $600 million. 

While no one quarrels with the need for stopping in- 
flation, it is hard to conceive of a spot where a cutback 
would be more undesirable. 



In the first place, people who are receiving Social Se- 
curity benefits do not have enough income to contribute 
materially to inflation. In fact, most of them are struggling 
to make ends meet. They have been victims of rather 
than contributors to inflation. 

There are plenty of spots where inflationary pressures 
can be tackled effectively. Closing tax loopholes is one. 
Cutting some of the fat out of the military budget is 
another. These are areas where billions upon billions of 
dollars are involved. 

Certainly, taking away from Social Security recipients 
who are already living below the poverty level in a great 
many instances is neither wise nor effective. 

What the Nixon program really proposes to do is to take 
a billion dollars from the incomes of the poorest group 
in the nation — a group which already is getting far less 
than decency dictates. 

Surely there are better and more equitable ways to 
fight inflation and balance the budget. ■ 



10 



THE CARPENTER 



WORDS 

TO BE 

EATEN 

by Jane Goodsell 

"Say. I know a sure cure for the hic- 
cups. Here's a glass of water. Now what 
you do is hold your breath and take 
little sips while I place my fingers on 
this spot in front of your ears. It works 

every time." 

* * * 

■Don't bother setting the alarm. I have 
this funny knack of being able to wake 
up any time I set my mind to." 

"What we need is a real livewire chair- 
man to set up a committee to study the 
problem." 

"Me. jump rope? Say listen, I used 
to be the neighborhood champion when 
1 was a kid. and I'll just bet I'm as good 
today as I ever was. Too bad there isn't 
a rope around so I can show you." 

* * * 
"Twenty-five cents? Listen, if we"re 

going to bet. let's make it a real bet. I 
hate to take your money because I know 
for a fact I'm right, but if you insist on 
being stubborn. I'll put up ten dollars 
against your five, okay?" 

* * * 

"No need to make a reservation. The 
maitre </' is a good friend of mine, and 
he'll fix us up with a choice table." 

"Pick a card, any card. Now place it 
face down on the table while I cut the 
cards — like so. Now I'll just close my 
eyes for a moment and concentrate. 
Okay, now I've got it. It's the seven of 
hearts, right?" 

*= * * 

"Well, naturally I can read my own 
writing. Just hand it over." 

"Of course, they'll be glad to see us. 
They told us to drop in anytime, didn't 
they?" 

4 * * 

"What do you mean, you don't know 
how to tic a square knot.' Why. there's 
nothing to it. You just slip this end 
through this loop and this end through 
here, and pull it tight and . . ." 

-:-■ * • 

"Well, so what if there aren't any 
prices on the menu? After all. you only 
live once, and dinner for two couldn't 
possibly cost more than fifteen dollars." 

* * * 

"Oh. go ahead and park here. I'll Stay 
in the ear and if a policeman comes, I'll 
explain that you've just run down the 
street to get some change." 




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MAY, 1969 



11 




3200 US citizens can claim 
a century of memories 

TWO 99-YEAR-OLD CARPENTERS APPROACH MILESTONE 




here are now 3,200 Ameri- 
cans who are more than 
100 years old. These cen- 
tenarians are able to recall 
many of our nation's most impor- 
tant events, having lived through 
more than half its existence. Their 
perspective casts our history and 
current events in a new light. 

One event in U.S. history which 
few of them viewed with impor- 
tance in 1936 — the passage of the 
Social Security Act — is perhaps the 
one most important facet of their 
lives today. Most of our 100-year- 
old citizens, if not all, depend 
largely on Social Security checks 
for their total income. Most of these 
individuals were at or beyond re- 
tirement age when the law was 
passed. 

Most of the old folks recall 
thinking at the time that it was a 
"good thing," but did not feel that 
it would apply to them. Some of 
them are receiving benefits as 
dependents of deceased offspring; 
others are getting special benefits 
based on a 1965 change in the 



Social Security Law which provided 
special payments at age 72 to those 
who do not have sufficient social 
security coverage for regular social 
security benefits. 

Yet many of America's centenar- 
ians get Social Security benefits 
based on their own work records, 
whose employment extended beyond 



their 75th birthdays; one individual 
recently retired at the age 102, con- 
vinced "that the time has come 
for some relaxation." 

Early this year, Thomas Caddick 
of Chicago Carpenters' Local 80, 
died at the age of 101. He had been 
a member of the United Brother- 
hood of Carpenters and Joiners for 
63 years, having joined on January 
14, 1906. 

Tn the past, the Brotherhood's 
Lakeland Home in Florida has hon- 
ored several centenarians with spe- 
cial birthday celebrations. Today, 
the oldest Lakeland resident is J. 
Hada, age 96. Mr. Hada is a mem- 
ber of Local 1209, Spring Lake. N.J. 

The rolls of beneficial members 
of the Brotherhood now list two men 
aged 99, but 16 who are 97 or older. 
There are nearly 150 Carpenters on 
the rolls 90 years or older. 

The recently issued Volume VII 
of "America's Centenarians," pub- 
lished by the Social Security Ad- 
ministration, recalls, however, that 
several among those interviewed 
had learned and used carpentry 
skills early in their lives, when the 
ability to build a house on the Amer- 
ican frontier was essential for 
family survival. 

The Social Security Administra- 
tion's book probes the memories of 
many of these oldest citizens, re- 
vealing little-known facts and in- 
teresting sidelights in the history of 
our country. Sparring with the great 
John L. Sullivan; watching the 
distant fiery glow of the Chicago 
Continued on page 14 




March 10 was a happy occasion for Lewis Breithaupt as members of Local 251, 
Kingston, New York, helped him celebrate his 96th birthday. Brother Breithaupt 
was awarded a 60-year pin by George Carlson, financial secretary. 
(A) Other members of Local 251 honoring Lewis Breithaupt, left to right, were 
Alfred Kandzia; Vincent Markle; Herman Gunter; and George Eichler, president. 
Brother Breithaupt is seated. 



12 



THE CARPENTER 




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Brother Frank Piatt, born in Oldham, 
Lancashire 92 years ago, has the distinc- 
tion of having 70 years continuous mem- 
bership in the Carpenters' Brotherhood, 
being a member of Local 452, Vancou- 
ver, B.C. He went to Vancouver in 1911, 
and except for a year in San Francisco 
has been there most of the time. He 
worked for the Vancouver School Board 
for a time. Brother Piatt is hale and 
hearty, visits his Union office regularly, 
and takes a good walk every day. 

3200 U.S. Citizens 

Continued from Page 12 

fire; taking care of Jesse James' 
horses — these are some of the vivid 
experiences they describe. Some of 
them remember the wars of other 
lands and tell how they made a 
living on the frontier or in the in- 
dustry or commerce of their 
adopted country. 

The oldest living Social Security 
beneficiary is Charlie Smith of Bar- 
tow, Fla. He celebrated his 126th 
birthday last July. Smith was 
brought to America from Liberia at 
the age of 12 and sold as a slave in 
New Orleans. 

Catherine Ward, who publicly ad- 
mits to being "100 years plus," was 
born in Sligo, Ireland, and is now 
living in New York City. She was 
fired from her first job as a box- 
maker in New Haven, Conn., in 
January, 1889, because she joined 
the Knights of Labor, and her em- 
ployer believed she was one of the 
ringleaders. 

Social Security interviews of the 
oldsters reveal not only keen mem- 
ories but an awareness of current 
happenings. 

Charles Steurer of Tarrytown, 
New York, finds no cause for alarm 
in the younger generation's con- 



tempt for authority, nor in hippies, 
pot, flower children and the old 
lament of alienation. 

"No generation is perfect," he 
said. "They are no worse than my 
generation and a lot smarter and 
better looking. The so-called bad 
ones get more publicity, that's all." 
He concedes, however, that there 
was a considerable difference be- 
tween the leisurely pace of living in 
his youth and the frenetic pace of 
today and perhaps a greater ap- 
preciation for simpler things. He 
recalls the thrill of getting his first 
ready-made clothes, an overcoat, at 
the age of 12. He bought it with 
money he saved from the $3.00 a 
week he earned in a guitar factory. 
"You see," he said, "we had 
guitars even then." 

Robert Grigsby of Kansas City, 
Kansas, was born in Hannibal, Mis- 
souri, the home of Mark Twain and 
the immortal characters Tom Saw- 
yer and Huck Finn. Mr. Grigsby 
recalls childhood play with Mark 
Twain and visiting the bluffs and 
caves near Hannibal which mark 
the adventures of Tom Sawyer. 



An active person who earned his 
social security credits working as a 
carpenter, Mr. Grigsby laughingly 
recalls a few years ago when his 
granddaughter called and said, 
"Mother! Grandpa is on the neigh- 
bor's roof." 

"That's all right, he knows what 
he is doing," her mother replied. 

Eugene Hodge of Dallas, Texas, 
credits himself with a great deal 
more hindsight than foresight. He 
recalls that social security started 
when he was working for a home for 
the aged. He figured it was a big 
fake and that the government had 
just figured out a way to take money 
from the working man. He admits 
that the money taken from his pay 
"sure is important to me now" since 
his social security checks are the 
main part of his income today. 

What are the worries of the cen- 
tenarians? If they have them, they 
certainly are not those one would 
normally expect. Mrs. Anna Burgess 
of Camp Springs, Maryland, attri- 
butes her longevity to the fact that 
"I've never worried about a thing, 
especially about getting old." 



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14 



THE CARPENTER 




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Major Construction Project 
In Headquarters Front Yard 

Union pile drivers and carpenters on the job 



■ The steady pounding of pile- 
drivers and the roar and clatter of 
cranes, sounds, this month, west 
of the Brotherhood Headquarters 
Building in Washington, D.C. as 
work continues apace on a major 
face-lifting project for the nation's 
capital. 

Union pilcdrivers of Local 23 I 1 
and carpenters of the District of Co- 
lumbia Area Council are working 
with other building craftsmen to 
complete approaches for an inner- 
loop roadway which will run under 
the Capitol Mall and feed fast- 
moving auto traffic away from down- 
town congestion. Once this work 



is completed, contractors expect to 
begin work on a big, new Labor 
Department Building, which will set 
squarely atop the roadway, adja- 
cent to the Brotherhood Headquar- 
ters. 

The foresight of Brotherhood 
leaders and convention delegates in 
selecting the present Headquarters 
location becomes increasingly clear, 
as the work continues through 1969. 
Pilcdrivers expect to be working a 
few months more on the traffic ar- 
tery, and this project will not be 
completed until 1974. The U.S. La- 
bor Department, now located at 
Constitution Avenue and 14th 



Street, N.W.. in the so-called Fed- 
eral Triangle of government build- 
ings, will then begin preparing for 
its new edifice. 

The construction work is an out- 
growth of plans drawn up by the 
President's Council on Pennsylvania 
Avenue, established by President 
Kennedy shortly after his inaugura- 
tion in 1961. It is part of a master 
plan to "revitalize the grand axis 
of the great capital city." (For a 
complete story on this, see the Feb- 
ruary. 1965, issue of The CARPEN- 
TER.) 

Before work could begin on the 
traffic artery, a six-story building 



MAY, 1969 



15 




A view of the traffic underpass looking north from Pennsylvania Avenue. Construc- 
tion is still in its early stages. 



across the street from the Brother- 
hood Headquarters had to be de- 
molished. This activity took up 
much of 1968. 

Construction activity has caused 
some inconvenience for visitors and 
employees at Brotherhood's Head- 
quarters. Traffic has become one- 
way on Second Street, N.W., di- 
rectly in front of the Headquarters, 
and the movement of trucks and 



building materials has cramped 
parking facilities in the surrounding 
area. At various stages of construc- 
tion test borings have been taken 
in the building parking lot and on 
the adjacent land, but these have 
been minor disturbances. 

In time, the work will all be 
done, and we can welcome new 
neighbors to the foot of Capitol 
Hill. 





™ ' i 
Members of Piledrivers Local 2311 are 
v * ♦*& also employed in the shoring up of 
i -* excavation walls. 



Piledrivers Business Representative Jack 
Smith, fourth from left; his assistant, 
Russell Gray, fifth from left; and Jim 
Merkle, BR for the district council, 
second from right, with members on 
the job. 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




Congress Urged to Restore 
Fair Income Tax Structure 



LOOPHOLES COST THE GOVERNMENT MORE THAN $15 BILLION A YEAR 



■ American labor called on Con- 
gress to restore fairness to the federal 
tax system by plugging tax loopholes 
and easing the burden on people in 
the low and middle income brackets. 

AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany 
said union members are willing to 
pay their "fair share" of taxes. But 
they are tired of subsidizing those 
"whose income is greater and whose 
taxes are lower — the 'loophole set' 
in today's society." 

Meany charged that the present 
federal tax structure is "rigged" 
against persons whose income comes 
from wages and salaries. 

He told the House Ways & Means 
Committee that there has been a 
loss of confidence in the fairness of 
the tax system because of glaring 
"loopholes and gimmicks" favoring 
those whose money comes from un- 
earned income such as investments. 

Meany gave this example of the 
abuses labor is protesting: 

"A married taxpayer with $8,000 
in capital gains pays a tax of $354 
while an $8,000 married wage earner 
is taxed at $1,000." 

AFL-CIO Legislative Dir. An- 
drew J. Biemiller and Research 
Dir. Nathaniel Goldfinger presented 
Meany's testimony at the House 
hearings. The AFL-CIO proposals 
were also supported "wholeheartedly 
and in their entirety" in separate 
testimony from the federation's 
Industrial Union Department. 

If enacted, the AFL-CIO "tax 
justice" proposals would close loop- 
holes which cost the government an 
estimated $15-to-17 billion a year 
in revenue. 

This would permit "much needed 
and long overdue" tax relief for 
Americans in the low, moderate and 
middle income brackets. 



Meany proposed specific changes 
in standard deductions and tax rates 
which would lower taxes for every- 
one, with the biggest percentage 
reductions in the lower income 
brackets. Thus the tax paid by a 
married worker with two children 
would be reduced 42.1 percent if 
he made $5,000 a year and 15.9 
percent on a salary of $15,000 a 
year. 

The AFL-CIO said it was sub- 
mitting its proposals on behalf of 
"the largest organized group of tax- 
payers in America" — union mem- 
bers who "pay their taxes regularly, 
payday after payday, through the 
payroll withholding program. 

Congress could ease inflationary 
pressures and high interest rates by 
repealing the 7 percent investment 
tax credit — which allows business 
firms to subtract from their federal 
tax bill an amount equal to 7 per- 
cent of the cost of new equipment 
and machinery. 

This amounts to a $3 billion-a- 
year giveaway, the AFL-CIO said, 
and means "the nation's taxpayers 
are picking up the tab so that a 
private firm can get a discount on 
the costs of its equipment." 

Meany told the Ways & Means 
Committee that the investment tax 
credit and accelerated depreciation 
on real estate "fuel the fires of the 
only source of inflationary demand 
in the national economy — business 
investment in plants, machines and 
equipment." 

He called also for an end to "the 
special provisions which permit oil 
operators, real estate investors and 
hobby farmers to write off non- 
exsistent costs." 

Thus "the nation's 20 oil giants 
pay an 8.5 percent tax rate" and 



"a real estate operator with a total 
income of $7.5 million pays taxes at 
the same rate as a $10,000 married 
wage earner with two children." 

In another area of tax avoidance 
by the wealthy, the AFL-CIO pro- 
posed a substitute for the present 
system of exempting from taxation 
the income from state and local 
bonds. 

The present exemption costs the 
treasury more than the states and 
municipalities gain, Meany said. He 
proposed, instead, that the federal 
government guarantee the bonds and 
pay one-third of the interest costs. 
Even with such a subsidy, the gov- 
ernment would come out $100 mil- 
lion ahead in revenue. 

Both the AFL-CIO and the 
Industrial Union Dept. urged a 
crackdown on tax loopholes that 
encourage conglomerate mergers 
and takeovers. IUD Administrative 
Dir. Jacob S. dayman told the 
House committee that "the onrush 
of mergers can be and should be 
reduced" by changing the tax laws. 

If all sources of presently tax- 
exempt income aren't fully taxed, 
the AFL-CIO said. Congress should 
at least impose a 25 percent mini- 
mum tax on exempt income. 

The federation proposed two key 
methods of reducing the tax burden 
on low and middle income groups. 

One would be to increase both 
the standard deduction that persons 
who do not itemize their returns 
can claim and the minimum stand- 
ard deduction, which lowers the tax 
burden on the poorest families. 

The other would provide relief 
for all taxpayers by dropping the tax 
rate on the first $1,000 of taxable 
income — after deductions — from 
the present 14 percent to 9 percent, 
and on the next tax bracke r from the 
present 15 percent to 13 percent. 

Meany urged the Ways & Means 
Committee to reject all proposals for 
tax "incentives" which, he said, 
"would provide additional loopholes 
. . . and further erode the fairness of 
the tax structure." 

He called for rejection also of all 
proposals for a federal retail sales 
tax. no matter whether described as 
a "value added" tax or identified 
clearly as a tax on consumers. ■ 



MAY, 1969 



17 



i^IHanadian Report 



Federal Government to 
Consider Labor Reports 

The federal Task Force on Labor Re- 
lations headed by Dean H. D. Woods 
of McGill University has produced a 
long series of recommendations cover- 
ing the federal labor jurisdiction which 
is bound to have a considerable impact 
on industrial relations in Canada. 

One of the first things it might ac- 
complish is to pull the teeth from the 
Rand Report on labor relations in On- 
tario. 

The Rand Report has been getting 
nationwide prominence for the vehe- 
mence with which it has been, and is 
being, attacked by the trade union move- 
ment. 

But the Woods Report does not sug- 
gest the all-powerful tribunal which 
Rand proposed and which has drawn 
labor's, and even management's, wrath. 

However it does suggest two new 
actions, one, the drafting of a new in- 
dustrial relations act, and two, a public 
interest disputes commission. 

The reaction of CLC President Don- 
ald MacDonald of the Canadian Labor 
Congress was moderate, subject to fur- 
ther study. 

The report also suggested an Incomes 
and Costs Research Board as an "edu- 
cational and advisory body" which 
would not publish guidelines. 

It supports the right to strike of fed- 
eral employees. It suggests a code for 
primary and secondary picketing which 
would give workers the right to refuse 
to cross picket lines to do work nor- 
mally done by strikers. 

The 100,000 word report cannot easily 
be summarized, especially since it con- 
tains a great deal of social comment 
and theory. But it has had a reasonably 
good reception, so it will be interesting 
to see what the federal government does 
with it. 

Postal Rate Increases 
Kill Two Labor Sheets 

Two major union newspapers have 
folded, and two have cut frequency of 
publication as a result of the new, 
sharply-increased postal rates. 

This was the scene as President Don- 
ald MacDonald of the Canadian Labor 
Congress issued a statement for the 
CLC and 10 provincial labor federa- 
tions. 

"Fantastic postage increases are pric- 
ing labor and other non-profit periodicals 
out of existence," said the statement, 
released at the close of the annual con- 
ference of CLC executive officers and 
leaders of the federations. 

"For some unions the postal bill has 



been raised by more than 2,000 per- 
cent." 

The Canadian Packinghouse Worker 

was cancelled after its March issue. Its 
postage bill would have gone from $1,000 
to $20,000 a year because of the new 
rates, and added circulation resulting 
from formation of the 40,000-member 
Canadian Food and Allied Workers. 

This increased circulation resulted 
from the merger of the United Packing- 
house Workers and the Amalgamated 
Meat Cutters. 

The CPW's last editorial was a blast 
at Eric Kierans. the postmaster-general 
who has refused to modify the huge 
postal rate increases for non-profit pub- 
lications. "Eric Kierans — you're a fink," 
declared the editorial heading. 

Editor Isaac Turner, who had not then 
known that the CPW would stop pub- 
lishing, commented afterward that he 
might have written something a "bit 
stronger" if he had known. 

He recalls that the CPW was the first 
wholly Canadian newspaper published 
by an international union. Its first issue 
came out in February, 1952. 

The Labor Statesman, official organ 
of the British Columbia Federation of 
Labor, has also been suspended after 
45 years of publication. It will be pub- 
lished periodically on special occasions. 

Canadian Transport which has been 
issued twice monthly by the Canadian 
Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and 
General Workers, will have only one 
issue during June, July and August. 

Le Monde Ouvrier (Labor World), 
official publication of the Quebec Fed- 
eration of Labor, is to appear six times 
a year instead of monthly. 

Mr. MacDonald commented: "We de- 
plore the philosophy behind the legis- 
lation: Profit-making periodicals such as 
Reader's Digest and Time magazine are 
subsidized by privileged postal rates 
which are denied to periodicals of Ca- 
nadian non-profit associations. 

"Not only are the postal rate increases 
curtailing freedom of expression by pric- 
ing it out of existence but they will also 
result in loss of employment in the 
printing, pulp and paper and related 
industries." 

The new regulations immediately 
raised the rates for non-profit publica- 
tions from five cents a pound to four or 
five cents an item. 

Canadians Boycott 
California Grapes 

Tired of trying to live on $2,000 a 
year, thousands of grape farm workers 
in California are in the fourth year of 
a strike to gain union recognition and 
have no intention of giving up. 

This is what Marshall Ganz, an orga- 



nizer for the Farm Workers Union, is 
telling Canadians at public meetings ar- 
ranged by the trade union movement. 
California is the wealthiest agricultural 
state in the United States, but its 400,000 
farm workers don't benefit from this 
affluence. For them it is still 1930 and 
the "Grapes of Wrath" are still growing, 
said Ganz. 

Ganz said Canadian unionists could 
aid the American farm workers by sup- 
porting the boycott against California 
grapes. Twenty per cent of California 
grape sales are to Canada. The city of 
Toronto for instance, is the third largest 
grape market in North America. It is 
exceeded only by New York and Los 
Angeles. 

Ganz has been working hard mobiliz- 
ing aid for the grape boycott, particularly 
through chain supermarkets where the 
union is applying the most pressure. He 
said May 10 has been declared grape 
boycott day. 

Benefits Published for 
Canadian Immigrants 

The Metro Toronto Labor Council 
has set up an Ethnic Labor Committee 
to campaign against the exploitation, 
abuse and unfair treatment of immi- 
grants arriving in Canada. 

Immigration to Canada has been heavy 
in the last decade. Half of all immigrants 
settle in Ontario, and half the Ontario 
immigrants settle in Metro Toronto. 

The committee has already published 
a series of informational leaflets in 
Italian, Portuguese and Greek. 

These leaflets include material about 
unemployment insurance and worker's 
compensation benefits and other rights 
to which Canadian workers are entitled. 

Housing Project 
First in Ontario 

The Windsor and District Labor Coun- 
cil is the first to sponsor a co-operative 
housing development in Ontario. 

It formed the Co-operative Dwellings 
Association of Windsor and set about 
planning a 26-story project containing 
300 one, two and three-bedroom units. 

The site of the project is an excellent 
one beside the Detroit River. The build- 
ing costing about four and a half million 
dollars should be ready within a year. 

Windsor, incidentally, is one of the 
few areas in Canada, where the building 
trades have successfully organized resi- 
dential construction. 

130-Unit Dwelling 
For Vancouver 

The British Columbia Federation of 
Labor is perhaps the first Federation in 



18 



THE CARPENTER 



Canada to get directly involved in the 
housing field. It has joined the Western 
Co-op Housing Association, which is 
planning to build a 130-unit project on 
6.6 acres of serviced, city-owned land in 
Vancouver. 

Cost of Living 
Increase Granted 

After conducting a rotating strike, the 
Ontario Hydro employees' union got vir- 
tually the settlement it wanted — a total 
of 18'^ per cent over two years allowing 
for a three per cent cost of living in- 
crease. 

Whereupon the chairman of the pub- 
licly-owned Ontario Hydro Commission 
said that rate increases are virtually in- 
evitable. 

The union, which conducted a high- 
powered publicity campaign during the 
five-week strike, contested this. 

They pointed out that in the 10 years 
ending in 1967 the big power company 
increased the power it generated by 181 
per cent. In the same period, however, 
productivity of hydro employees went 
up 249 per cent while the number of 
employees went down 10 per cent. At the 
same time wages went up only 146 per 
cent. 

You can't blame the need for a power 
rate increase on the union, said officers 
of the 10,000 member local. 

ILA Fund Guarantees 
Adequate Employment 

Federal Labor Minister Bryce Mack- 
asey has dubbed himself the Babe Ruth 
of the bargaining table after settling four 
major disputes in a row. All could easily 
have ended in strikes. 

The self-satisfaction of the federal 
cabinet minister in charge of industrial 
relations may be immodest but this ex- 
trusion of ego is warranted by the results. 

His latest triumph was an agreement 
between the International Longshoremen's 
Union covering 2,000 workers at the 
port of Montreal and the port employers. 

Due credit should also be given to 
Associate Chief Judge Alan Gold, who 
was the federal mediator on the scene. 
and Louis Laberge. president of the 
Quebec Federation of Labor, who was 
the union nominee in the negotiations. 

The settlement is a 21 per cent increase 
ov»r three years. But more important is 
the establishment of a technological dis- 
placement fund to guarantee the ILA 
members covered by the agreement 40 
hours' work a week for 37 weeks a year. 

The fund will also assist those who 
may be dropped from the rolls at the 
end of the contract period. 

On its part the union agreed to allow 
freedom of the employers to use con- 
tainerization, the growing trend in over- 
seas transport. 

Ontario Fed to 
Improve Labor's Image 

The public relations campaign of the 
Ontario Federation of Labor is making 



a considerable impact in the province. 

Geared to a major TV spot presenta- 
tion of information which the public 
would not normally obtain, the campaign 
also includes information kits of book- 
lets and leaflets, and newspaper adver- 
tisements. 

Five hundred TV spots on seven major 
stations have been booked over a three- 
month period starting early in April. The 
areas covered are Toronto, Hamilton. 
London, Windsor, Sudbury, Sault Ste. 
Marie and the Lakehead. 

Newspaper advertisements are run 
with the co-operation of the local labor 
council, paid for 50-50 by the council 
and the OFL. 

A sum of about $100,000 is involved 
in this PR effort. If it succeeds in getting 
labor's view across and improving labor's 
image, it will undoubtedly be continued. 

OFL officers David Archer, president, 
and Douglas Hamilton, secretary-treas- 
urer, are watching the results closely. If 
they are relatively good across the prov- 
ince, some recommendations will likely 
go to the next convention based on a 
continuation of the campaign in some 
form or other. 

At the moment the OFL has a new 
pamphlet off the press called "Unions 
Protect YOU too!" 

This goes to everyone sending in the 
coupon from the newspaper advertise- 
ments. A heavy demand from the public 
as well as unions is expected. 

U.S. Affiliation 
Brings Strong Unity 

Canadian unions have by no means 
lost their independence, and are far 
from being dominated by their U.S. 
labor affiliations, according to a report 
made by a special commission study- 
ing the structure of the Canadian La- 
bour Congress. In fact, in their battles 
with giant international corporations, 
Canadian unions have profited by their 
affiliations with such international la- 
bor organizations. 

Hazard for Birth 
Control Pill Makers 

The most unusual occupational haz- 
ard of the century has resulted in the 
Ortho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. of 
Toronto. Canada having to provide 
astronaut suits to its workers. The 
company manufactures birth control 
pills and learned very early that if 
their workers weren't protected by 
oxygen-fed space suits, they would 
develop enlarged bosoms and falsetto 
voices. Women are not affected by 
hormones, hut women can't be used 
because the work is too heavy. Ortho 
is the largest producer of birth control 
pills in Canada, with an output of 
more than a million pills a month. 




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MAY, 196 9 



19 





MMftffl 




ooo 



. . . those members of our Brotherhood who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won awards, or who have, in other ways, "'stood 
out from the crowd." This month, our editorial hat is off to the following: 



BENT NAIL — Recip- 
ient of the 1969 
Bent Nail Award, 
presented annually 
by California Car- 
penters to out- 
standing leaders is 
Joe Cambiano, 
former Genera] 
Executive Board 
member now in 
retirement. He is 
shown here, second 
from left, with 
GEB Member 
Charles Nichols, 
center, and other 
well-wishers. 





CRAFTSMANSHIP AWARD-Oliver J. Ny- 

gaard, right a veteran Grand Forks, 
North Dakota, carpenter of Local 2028. 
was presented a craftsmanship award 
during the recent annual convention of 
the North Dakota chapter of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Architects. Brother Ny- 
gaard has been an active member in his 
local union for 36 years. The award was 
presented by Irvin C. Holman. Fargo, 
president of NDAIA, at the awards ban- 
quet. (Photo by Kenneth Kleven, Grand 
Forks Herald.) 

EFFORT FOR ELDERLY— General Treasurer 
Peter E. Terzick has been named chair- 
man of the Technical Advisory Commit- 
tee on Problems of the Elderly, which 
was established recently by the AFL- 
CIO. The committee, made up of leaders 
of several international labor unions, is 
looking into ways in which senior citi- 
zens can continue to serve vital roles in 
modern society. The committee was es- 
tablished at the February meeting of 
the Federation governing body. 



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20 



THE CARPENTER 



Dates, Locations for GE-Westinghouse 



Dates and locations for a series of 16 
"grass roots" meetings throughout the 
country were announced recently by the 
AFL-CIO Coordinated Bargaining Com- 
mittee of General Electric-Westinghouse 
unions. 

The meetings will be conducted to ex- 
plain the national bargaining goals of the 
Coordinated Bargaining Committee 
(CBC) to the 200.000 GE and Westing- 
house workers involved. 

James D. Compton. CBC steering com- 
mittee chairman, announced that the 16 
meetings will be held during the next 
three months prior to the opening of ne- 
gotiations with the two companies. 

Compton said emphasis at the meetings 
will be on "grass roots'' participation by 
members of the 270 locals involved and 
on question-and-answer periods. 

In each city, a local of one of the ten 
unions participating will act as host for 
delegates from all unions. 

Principal speakers are also being se- 
lected from the top leadership of the ten 
unions. 

The first meeting was held April 
18 in San Jose, California. Principal 



speaker was William Drohan, vice pres- 
ident of the International Union of 
Electrical Workers. 

Other meeting dates and locations are: 
April 21, Louisville. Ky.: April 24. At- 
lanta, Ga.; April 28. Philadelphia, Pa.; 
May 1, Memphis, Tenn.; May 6, Fort 
Wayne. Ind.; May 8, Pittsburgh, Pa.; May 
13, Cincinnati, O.; May 15, Lynn, Mass.; 
May 19, Newark, N. J.; May 22. Colum- 
bus. O.; May 24. Pittsfield. Mass.; June 3, 
Cleveland, O.; June 10, Syracuse. N. Y.; 
June 17, Chicago, III.; and June 20, 
Dallas, Tex. 

The ten unions participating are the 
International Union of Electrical. Radio 
and Machine Workers, the International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the 
United Steelworkers, the International 
Association of Machinists and Aerospace 
Workers. Allied Industrial Workers. Flint 
Glass Workers, United Association of 
Journeymen and Apprentices of the 
Plumbing and Pipe Fitting Industry of 
the United States and Canada, the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners 
of America. International Association of 
Sheet Metal Workers, and the American 
Federation of Technical Engineers. 



COPE Banquet 
In Philadelphia 




The Board of Directors of The Commit- 
tee on Political Education, AFL-CIO. 
Philadelphia Branch, recently held its 
20th Annual COPE banquet in the Grand 
Ballroom of the Bellevue-Shratford Hotel 
to which local members, wives and guests 
of the Metropolitan District Council 
(Philadelphia, Delaware, Chester, Mont- 
gomery and Bucks Counties) were invited 
to attend. Each person who attended the 
affair contributed $25. Distinguished 
guests attending the celebration of COPE 
were, left to right: Mayor James H. J. 
Tate; Robert H. Gray, secretary. Metro- 
politan District Council; and Senator 
Harrison A. Williams of New Jersey. 



Retirement Dinner Held in Indiana 



Pension Cheeks 
For Husband. Wife 





A recent dinner, sponsored by the Overhead Door Company of Indiana, was held 
at the Blackford Country Club for the purpose of honoring retiring members of 
Local 2047, Hartford City, Indiana. Senior citizens honored, front row. left to 
right: Carroll Sones, Frank Farling. Virgil Kellogg and Clarence Dickey, retirees. 
Back row. left to right: Carl Bennett, shop steward: Sam Fanning, Charles Candlish, 
and Walter Dutro, retirees. 

Other retirees unable to attend the affair were Raymond Melick. Ray Hackney 
and Earl Warren. 



he headquarters of Local 2907. \\ eed. 
California, was the scene of a recent cere- 
mony at which Eugene Martin and his 
wife, Catherine, were presented with their 
lirst Brotherhood pension checks. The 
Martins both joined Lumber and Sawmill 
Workers Local 2835 in Weslwood, Cali- 
fornia, in 1938. 

Harold "Mac" McKcn/ie. Brotherhood 
representative, is pictured congratulating 
Brother and Mrs. Martin for their long 
and active service. 



MAY. 1969 



21 



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22 



61st Anniversary Fete Held in New York 

— r »EMp7 TE r D ,,lu w 19^1 imC? ,'■ -J™ 




Members of Local 1921, Hempstead, New York, held an anniversary banquet late 
last year to commemorate 61 years of service in the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners of America, with officers of the Nassau County District Council attending. 
Distinguished members seated at the table, left to right: Benjamin Edwards, financial 
secretary; Eugene Hartigan, president and business representative; Peter Terzick, Gen- 
eral Treasurer; John G. Rosenstrom, secretary and business representative; and John 
Rogers, General Representative. Standing, left to right: Fred Bottcher, treasurer; Jack 
Ferris, District Council delegate; Bill McCaw, trustee; Ozzi Vik, warden; Val Cant- 
well, trustee; E. G. "Jerry" Schork, recording secretary; Harry Rhodes, District Coun- 
cil delegate; and Pete Track, conductor. 

Six Sons — All Carpenters in New Jersey 




William Den Dulk is the proud father of six sons, each a carpenter. Brother Den 
Dulk and five of his sons are affiliated with Local 391, Hoboken, New Jersey, while 
one son is a member of Local 299, Union City, New Jersey. Members of the Den 
Dulk Family are, seated, left to right: Jahn Den Dulk, Local 299; William Den Dulk, 
father, Local 391; and Henerick Den Dulk, Local 391. Standing, left to right: 
Leonard Den Dulk, William Den Dulk, Jr., Marinus Den Dulk, and Arend Den Dulk, 
all members of Local 391. 



Membership contributions are needed in the 1969 Drive of the Carpenters 
Legislative Improvement Committee. Let's click with CLIC! 

THE CARPENTER 




By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 

■ BA Takes a Buck 

According to recent letters, it appears 
that Brotherhood nimrods. and the mem- 
bers of their families, got their share of 
game. Some of them didn"t stray too 
far from their kitchen door to do so. 
Before getting deeply involved in the 
forthcoming angling scene, here's a recap 
on some of the past hunt season's action: 

One of the top. near-home deer kills 
we've heard tell about for quite a spell 
can be credited to James Chiasson of 
Laconia. New Hampshire, a member and 
business agent for Local 1247. Here's a 
photograph of Brother Chiasson with his 
mammoth buck which he downed on Mt. 
Cube in his home state. He nailed it at 
3:45 p.m. but didn't get it out of the 
woods until 10:30 p.m.. understandable 
when one considers that it dressed out 
at 2 1 6 ' 2 pounds, an unusually heavy deer 
for New Hampshire, we hear. 

■ Younger Readers 

The following letter was received from 
a youngster: 

"Please send me information, in fact, 
all you've got on the outdoors. I'm in 
a tight spot in school. If 1 fail in science 
while you throw this letter around, it's 
your fault. (Unfortunately the young 




James Chiasson (BA Takes a Buck) 

lady may have failed her science tests 
as she neglected to include her last name 
as well as omitting her return address.) 

Another request for information was 
curt and right to the point: 

"I would like to have some informa- 
tion about wild life. I want to know 
how it started and who started it?" 




\\ 



N 



Gerhard Gramer (Archer's Success) 
MAY, 1969 



■ Archers Success 

Avid archers are all members of the 
Gramer family of Bensenville. Illinois. 
Dad — Gerhard Gramer. a member of 
Local 80 in Chicago — nailed his deer via 
the bow-and-arrow route on his lirst time 
out, a doe which dressed out around 100 
pounds, brought down in the deer-lush 
state of Wisconsin. Here's a photograph 
of Brother Gramer with his prize. Wife 
Stefanie. daughter Diane and son Ronnie 
share his interest in the archer's sport. 

■ Near Kitchen Door 

James Leo Johnson of Reno. Nevada, 
a member of Local 971. says his home 
state has more to oiler besides gambling, 
claims it is one of the best hunting stales 
in the nation and sends in the following 
photograph as proul of his claim. He is 
holding a monstrous Canadian honker 
which he brought down just a few stone 
throw's from his kitchen door. 



Bennie Hughes and dad (La. Luck) 

■ Louisiana Luck 

Hunter of Louisiana's Lake Ponchar- 
train swamplands is 13-yr.-old Bennie 
Hughes, whose mother is a member of 
Local 3177. Mr. and Mrs. Hughes and 
Bennie reside in Livingston, in the south- 
central portion of the state. Bennie 
downed his first deer shortly after round- 
ing five years of age. He traps, fishes, 
and hunts for such species as rabbit, 
squirrel, duck and dove. Here's a photo- 
graph of the lad with his recent trophy, 
and dad crouching in the background. 

■ One-Shot Wheaton 

It must be particularly satisfying for 
Charles F. Wheaton Jr. when he gets his 
big game inasmuch as he downs it with 
a rifle he built himself — from scratch. 
Brother Wheaton. who lives at Anaheim. 
California, is a member of Local 1815 
at Santa Ana. We hear, via the outdoor 
grapevine, that he scored a double header 
last year — a whitetail in the San Ber- 
nardino Mountains which dressed out at 
125 pounds and a mulie from a remote 
section of King's Canyon in northern 
California which dressed out at 1(S5 
pounds. And both were downed with 
one shot: The whitetail a shoulder shot 
at over 250 yards and the mulie with a 
neck shot at 150 yards. Other California 
targets for Wheaton include bear, cougar 
and wild pig. 

continued on page 24 




J. L. Johnson (Near Kitchen Door) 



23 



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the steep pitcli of 24" rise to 1?" 
run is reached. 

There are 2400 widths of build- 
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There are 2400 Commons and 2400 
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Let us prove it, or return your money. 



Getting the lengths of rafters by the spah and 
the method of setting up the tables is fully pro- 
tected by the 1917 & 1944 Copyrights 



U.S.A. Send $2.50. If C.O.D. pay Post 
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C.O.D. pay Post Office $3.48. Canadians 
buy only from a Canadian book store. Ask 
us for their address. 

A. RIECHERS 

P. O. Box 405 Palo Alto, Calif. 94302 




W<~^ 



22- 



Outdoor Meanderings 

Continued from preceding page 

■ Heavyweight Beaver 

Some time ago, we wrote about a giant 
beaver, trapped by Leslie Link of Bend, 
Oregon. It weighed 76 pounds. Since 
then we've been informed of a larger 
one, trapped in Western Maryland, and 
believed to be the oldest ever reported 
trapped in the U. S. According to con- 
clusion by Dr. Joseph S. Larson of the 
University of Maryland's Natural Re- 
sources Institute, a beaver, trapped by 
Virgil Sisler of Terra Alta, West Virginia 
in the Muddy Creek area of Garrett 
County, Maryland, was 21 years old. It 
tipped the scales at 100 pounds. Age of 
beaver was determined from dental ex- 
amination technique developed in 1964. 

■ Moose in BC 

According to a note from C. Erickson, 
financial secretary of Local 452, Van- 
couver, British Columbia, fellow member 
Andy Torgerson, a hunt vet of long 
standing, distinguished himself this past 
season, celebrating his 80th birthday with 
a "go" at moose. A big-game hunter all 
his adult years, he nailed one on a suc- 
cessful junket with friends in the wilds 
out of Vanderhoof in central B. C. (Un- 
fortunately we could not use color pic 
which was too faint for reproduction.) 

■ 26-Inch Trout 

Not all of those lunker rainbow trout 
are caught in the west. Recently received 
was a report of a seven pounder, caught 
by C. H. "Chuck" Hancock of Peters- 
burg, West Virginia, a member of Local 
1590. He nipped it in nearby Spring 
Run. and it measured 26 inches from 
nose to tail. Chuck was down to 12-lb. 
test line, topped off with cheese eggs for 
bait. 

■ Slow Rubber Worm 

A recent catch by Carl F. Schomer of 
Allison Park, Pa., a member of Local 
6018, points out that artificials can be, 
at times, just as effective as bait. He 
nipped a chunky northern largemouth 
from Three Rivers, Michigan, on a slow- 
retrieved rubber worm. It tipped the 
scales at 41 pounds and measured 14!/i 
inches down the back. "Gave me quite 
a tussle," said Carl. 



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24 



THE CARPENTER 




^rn 




Send In Your Favorites! Mail To: Plane Gossip. 101 Constitution 
Avenue, N.W.. Washington, D. C. 20001. SORRY, NO PAYMENT. 



Cfoser to Home 

The minister saw 9-year-old Jimmy 
with a black eye and torn clothes. 
"Oh Jimmy," said the preacher, "I 
pray you may never fight again and 
never receive another black eye!" 
"That's okay, Reverend," popped back 
Jimmy. "You wait until you get home 
and pray over your own kid. I just 
gave him two of 'em!" — Shelia Proc- 
tor, Erin, Tenn. 

FOR BETTER LAWS, GIVE TO CLIC 

Auto Be Disgusted! 

The boss took his new car back to 
the dealer for its 1500-mile checkup. 
"What seems to be the trouble?" 
they asked. "Well," said the boss, 
"I'll put it to you this way: Every- 
thing on it makes a noise except the 
horn!" 

R U A UNION BOOSTER? 




/Money Talks, Women Listen! 

The runty little playboy was not 
making much progress with his tall, 
statuesque blonde date until he hap- 
pened to mention: "I may appear to 
be somewhat taller than I actually am, 
because I'm sitting on my wallet!" 



Giving Him the Bird 

After he had bought a parrot at an 
auction, a man said as he paid for it, 
"I hope this bird can talk!" "Sure he 
can," replied the auctioneer. "Who 
do you think was bidding against you 
for the last ten minutes?" — Jakob 
Keller, Lodi, Calif. 

ATTEND YOUR UNION MEETINGS 

Colorful Speech 

The Local Union Lush describes a 
pink elephant as "a beast of bour- 
bon." 

UNION DUES — TOMORROW'S SECURITY 

Improper Measures 

It's a measure of our secretary's 
interest that she's certain two pints 
makes one cavort! 

LIKE TOOLS, BE SHARP & SAFE 

Consider the Hammer 

A good hammer doesn't lose its 
head and fly off the handle. It hits 
the nail right on the head and drives 
its point home solidly. Occasionally, 
when it makes a mistake, it acts to 
clinch matter firmly and is prepared 
to rectify it at once. For the most 
part, it keeps pounding away until 
the job is done. It is the world's only 
knocker that does a constructive job. 
Small wonder it is always being given 
a qood hand grip — Louis Delin, Local 
608, N.Y. 



This Month's Limerick 

There was once a carpenter named 

Mack 
Who drove a spike instead of a tack. 
He tried pulling It out, 
But he lost that bout, 
New Mack has a crick in his back. 

—John R. Hall, Oxnard Calif. 



He Was Really Bugged! 

A wealthy man travelling overnight 
on a railroad, was chewed by bed- 
bugs. On his return he wrote an angry 
letter to the railroad's president. In 
due time he received an apologetic 
letter saying this was the first time the 
line had ever had such a complaint 
and that, due to his letter, precau- 
tions were being taken to insure that 
it never happened again, etc., etc. 
He was feeling good about the whole 
thing until a scrap of paper fell out 
of the opened envelope. It said "Send 
this grouch the bedbug letter." 

IN UNION THERE IS STRENGTH 




Not Much Choice 

Adam said to Eve: "Do you really 
love me?" And Eve niftied back: 
"Sure . . . who else?" 

unionism s rAR is wi ni ■ 

Polite Husband 

Jce: I haven't spoken to my wife in 
three weeks. 

Moe: Why not? 

Joe: I don't like to interrupt! 
—Richard J. Yoller, Port Arthur, Ont. 



MAY, 1969 



25 



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SERVICE TO THE BROTHERHOOD 






1A 

(1) CASPER. WYO. — A gold 50-year membership pin was 
awarded to Ward Lewis, Local 1564, at a banquet held at 
Carpenters Hall earlier this year. Brother Lewis joined the 
Brotherhood as an apprentice in 1919 at age 17 and is the 
youngest member ever to receive a 50-year pin from this local. 
He has served as an officer of Local 1564 in every capacity 
except that of business representative. 

Robert Harris, international representative, is pictured pre- 
senting the 50-year pin to Ward Lewis. H. Paul Johnson, busi- 
ness representative and John Neifert, president, also offer their 
congratulations to the honored member. 

Twenty-five year members also honored at Local 1564's cere- 
monies were Carl Farstad and Ralph Mathisen. Members eli- 
gible to receive 25-year pins, but who were unable to attend the 
pin presentation, were Guy McConnell and Claude Selby. Ap- 
prentice Edward Hodgins was eligible to receive his Journey- 
mans Certificate but was unable to be present at the affair. 

(1A) Members and officers pictured, left to right, are H. Paul 
Johnson, Carl Farstad, Ralph Mathisen, Robert Harris and 
John Neifert. 

Members of the Carpenters Ladies Auxiliary 104 served at 
the banquet. 




(2) VANCOUVER, B. C. Tom Jones of Local 452 (left), 
congratulates Andy Torgerson on his 30 years' membership 
in the Brotherhood, while Andy returns the compliment to 
his friend who has been in the Union for 20 years. 



26 



THE CARPENTER 



1969 Apprenticeship Com 


test 


Calc 


mdar 




Date 




Mill- 


Mill- 


State 


Carpenter 


Cabinet 


wright 


Alabama 


April 10. 11, & 12. 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Alaska 


June 20 & 21, 1969 


X 






Arizona 


April 26, 1969 


X 






California 


June 18, 19, 20 & 21, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 




X 


X 


X 


* Delaware 


June 7, 1969 


X 






District Of Columbia 


Apr. 26 & May 3. 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


May 15, 1969 


X 






Illinois 


May 8 & 9, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


* Indiana 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


June 13 & 14, 1969 


X 






Kansas 




X 


X 


X 


Louisiana 


June 21 & 22, 1969 


X 




X 


* Maine 




X 






Massachusetts 


June 13 & 14, 1969 


X 


X 




Michigan 


May 26 & 27, 1969 


X 




X 


Minnesota 


June 19, 1969 


X 






Missouri 


May 17, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


* Nebraska 


June 28, 1969 


X 






Nevada 


April 18 & 19. 1969 


X 


X 




New Jersey 


May 9 & 10, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico 


June 7. 1969 


X 






New York 


July 16, 17 & 18. 1969 


X 






Ohio 


May 27 & 28, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


June 19 & 20, 1969 


X 






Oregon 




X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


April 11, & 12, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


May 2 & 3. 1969 


X 






Texas 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 




X 


Utah 


May 17 & 24, 1969 


X 






Washington 


June 5, 6&7, 1969 


X 


X 




Wisconsin 


May 2 & 3, 1969 


X 






Alberta 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 






British Columbia 




X 






Manitoba 


June 6 & 7, 1969 


X 






Ontario 


May 29 & 30, 1969 


X 




X 


TOTALS 




36 


15 


16 



new 



*New States entering 1969 contest. 

Neiv Jersey BA 
Wins $10,000 Prize 

David R. Hedlund of Florence, N.J., 
business agent for Burlington County 
Local 1849. recently accepted a check 
for $10,000 from the Getty Oil Com- 
pany in a colorful presentation at Fritch- 
man's Flying A station at Front and 
Summer in Florence. Hedlund won the 
$10,000 by spelling the words "Some- 
thing Extra" in the oil company's cur- 
rent contest. 

After receiving the $10,000 and a 
congratulatory kiss from Miss Some- 
thing Extra, Hedlund announced that he 
would contribute $1,000 of his winnings 
to the First Baptist Church of Florence. 
The remainder will go towards buying 
a new home for his family which in- 
cludes four children. 



J 



ioooo m 5/ 

KM* 



\ 



UL 




Hedlund, second from right, accepts his 
$10,00(1 prize from Miss Something 
Extra. Others watching the joyous event 
are. from left: Major Wilkic of Flor- 
ence, Herb Fritchman, Filing A dealer, 
and Kolphc Lundgrcn, assistant division 
marketing manager of Getty Oil Co. 



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of Union-made Work Clothes" 



MAY, 1969 



27 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



THE FRAMING SQUARE 

The Home Study Course on the 
Framing Square has now been 
compiled into a unit and is avail- 
able through the regular ordering 
sources at the cost of 30 cents per 
copy. 




(A) ABOVE AND BELOW, apprentice graduates, members of the Brotherhood, and guests have their pictures taken follow- 
ing graduation ceremonies at Detroit. 

Apprentice Grads Get Certificates 
In Recent Detroit Ceremonies 

Certificates of apprenticeship training completion were pre- 
sented recently to 181 carpentry graduates of the Detroit, 
Mich., Apprenticeship Training School. Ceremonies for the 
big presentation were held at the Raleigh House in South- 
field, Mich., before a large gathering of members and guests. 

It was the 23rd annual testimonial banquet and graduating 
class ceremony. While many dignitaries were on hand, only 
four formal speeches were delivered. They were by Finlay C. 
Allan, First General Vice President; John Harrington, Car- 
penters District Council Secretary-Treasurer; Paul Westergaard, 
a member of Local 998 and a graduate; and Raymond Fair, 
JAC Chairman and DDC President. 

The 1968 apprentice graduates included: 

LOCAL UNION 19— Gerald Albert Ahonen, Raymond B. Alex- 
ander, Randolph Joseph Bergeron, Ronald Franklin Bober, Kellon 
Doyle Counts, Dennis Allan Hacke, Walter Hajec, Jr., John Mont- 
gomery Harris, Jack Holt, Gary N. Howard, Roy Andrew Johnston, 
Karl Kay Kaminski, David L. Konopka, Harold Francis Lear, 
Leonard Philip Lewandowski, Charles Frederick Louwerse, Ronald 
Roy McEachran, Michael Scott Minch, James Madison Roberts, 
John Alfred Shilliday, James David Smith, Ray Michael Sweitzer, 
Kenneth Dwight Thornton, Mario Christaleno Uchergi, Ralph 
Gerald Walker, Thomas Clifford Wolff, Thomas Gordon Zambeck. 

LOCAL LNION 26— Charles Roger Anderson, Rodney Don 
Beebe, Gerald Lewis Burgess, Robert William Carbone, Joseph 
Frank Casali, William Roger Chontos, Wallace John Czerwenka, 
John Walden Davis, Salvatore Joseph DeAngelo, Thomas Frank 
Denek, Robert Joseph Denomme, Lloyd Herman Duty, Joseph 
Stanley Golaszewski, William Lewis Hall, Lloyd Jacob Isotato, 
Robert Cecil Jackson, Kenneth Glen Koebele, Robert Richard Krist, 
Ronald Land, Gerald F. Lange, Ralph Lafayette Lowe, Jr., Richard 
Major, Aaron F. Mordell, Anthony Joseph Orlando, Dominic John 
Orlando, Douglas Eugene Pierce, Carl William Queck, Gerald 
Bailey Routen, Max Anthony Schuster, Jack Harold Sobjack, Law- 
rence Carl Stancato, Charles Donald Sugg, Pete Marino Terenzi, 
Robert Jerome Titus, Marvin George VanHuyse, Lynn Daniel 
Walters, Timothy W. Weiler. Richard Allen Wieske, Patrick Robert 
Wozniak. 

LOCAL UNION 337— Roger Wilfred Bergeron, Ronald Ray 




28 



THE CARPENTER 



Cherry, William Francis Donahue, Dale Leroy Engberg, Pedro 
Esquina, Dingus Gibson, Richard Edward Hansen, Henry Donald 
Kidd, Edward Earl Miller, Anthony Ignazio Montalbano. Robert 
Gene Morefield, Raymond Charles Ryan, John Paul Schleben, 
Ronald James Urbanczyk, Willard Walter Wheeler, Clarence Win- 
ston. 

LOCAL UNION 674 — Roger Eronie Bauman, Thomas John 
Chillog, Frank David Detzler, Harold Vernon Detzler, Richard Larry 
Diggs, Richard Matthew Drinkhorn, Anthony Morris Farenger, 
Robert Charles Farrow, William Bernard Fisher, Lee Guy French, 
Daniel J. Griffiths, Thomas Gregory Grzadzinski, James Elmore 
Hopper, Herbert Carl Hernaghan, James Allen McClellan, Robert 
Dale Matthews, Stephen Anthony Media, Dennis Allen Orell, Gary 
Michael Ottenbacker, Peter Alexander Santo. Harold Wayne Rogers, 
John Peter Schietecatte, Nelson Howard Werdernan. 

LOCAL UNION 982 — Raymond James Ackerson, Dannie Earl 
Alexander, Jr., Kenneth Lee Allison, Richard Randolph Ascherl, 
William Adams Avery, Cornelis Borst, Jr., Robert Urban Boyer, 
Jerry Ted Brandow, David Marshall Caurdy, Gerald C. Convery, 
Roy Chando Elmore, Ted Ernest Glatfelter, Jr., Richard Eldon Gress, 
Edward Thomas Guldner, Robert Glenn Hanson, Dennis Blair 
Henry, Joseph Patrick Herz, Gerald Lamar Hibbs, Jay Richard 
Jerore, Gary Walter Kinsel, Walter Francis Lindsey, Frederick 
Luitink, James Edward Maloney, Jerry D. Mix, John Morgan 
O'Connor, Peter Schmidt, Frank Strehl, William George Styrk, Fred 
Arnold Tiffin. 

LOCAL UNION 998— John Barber, Edward James Bedore, 
William Michael Bordynoski, George O. Braxton, Jr., James Rey- 
nold Broome, Michael Lynn Buck, Donald Dwain Bullock. William 
Leonard Crowell, Richard H. Doty, Daniel Wesley Easton, Francis 
Roy Floyd, Gary Lee Hewitt. John A. Kelley, Patrick Henry 
Ketterer, Thomas Robert Kohlhorst, Thomas Michael Krupinski, 
Jerry Joe Kumler. James Edward Lasley, Richard Donald Leemhuis, 
Dennis Robert Maki, Edwin Jon Miller, Daniel Oberbaugh, Robert 
Earl Pinner, Thomas Pisa, Thomas Sterling Powell, Louis Schimento, 
Kenneth Dale Smith, Robert Daniel Stanichuk, James William 




Paul Westergaard of Local 998 receives his certificate from 
Finlay C. Allan, first vice-president of the United Brotherhood 
of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Pictured, from left, are 
Ralph Wood, business representative of Local 982 and a mem- 
ber of the Detroit Joint Apprentice Committee; Raymond 
Fair, JAC chairman and president of the Carpenters District 
Council; Westergaard; Jack Wood, secretary -manager of the 
Detroit Building Trades Council; Allan; Anthony "Pete" Och- 
ocki, project coordinator for Manpower Development and 
Training for the Brotherhood, and John Harrington, CDC 
secretary-treasurer. 



Stewart, Theodore Geoffrey Tarsney. Robert Henry Warthman, 
Larry James Watson, Paul Stanley Westergaard, Dennis Earl Wright. 

LOCAL UNION 1067— Lewis Roy King, Frederick John Osmer. 

LOCAL UNION 1433— Paul Arthur Belden. Robert L. Borne. 
George Nick Cadovich, Thomas Myron Durkee. Charles Richard 
Ingersoll. Donald Dale Lucas, Robert Jacob Lustig. James Thomas 
Nelson, Joseph John Rusk. 

LOCAL UNION 1513— Jack Klain, Henry Earl Plowden. 



Detroit Area Apprenticeship Contest Completed; Molnar, Carpenter Winner 




■ ■ ■ 







There were congratulations all around in Cobo Hall after 
Joseph Molnar, of Detroit Carpenters Local 19, finished on 
top in the fourth annual Area Carpentry Apprentice Contest. 
Molnard is shown below clutching the walnut plaque he re- 
ceived. Pictured, from left, are Raymond Cooks, coordinator; 
Stuart Proctor, a contest judge and international representative 
of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters' Apprentice Com- 



mittee; Raymond Fair, chairman of the Detroit Carpenters 
Apprenticeship Committee and president of the Detroit Carpen- 
ters District Council; Molnar; John Harrington. CDC secretary- 
treasurer; David Orrell. JAC secretary; and Ralph Wood, busi- 
ness representative of Local 982 and member of the Detroit 
JAC. The picture above shows contestants and sponsors, and 
the picture below right shows the contest area in Cobo Hall. 







MAY, 1969 



29 



Southern States Apprenticeship Conference Leaders Lay Plans 




Members of the host committee, steering committee and advisors are pleased with plans for the 21st Annual Meeting of the 
Southern States Apprenticeship Conference scheduled for Memphis, Tenn., July 24-26. Approximately 2,000 are expected to at- 
tend, representing management, labor and government. Two hundred and fifty apprentices will be honored at the conference. 
Discussions are planned for major trades, including carpentry and joining. Shown here are, left to right: Charles Pitts, secretary- 
treasurer of the SSAC steering committee (maintenance engineer for Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Coosa River Newsprint Di- 
vision, Coosa Pines, Alabama); L. E. Marler, vice-chairman, SSAC steering committee (supervisor of training, Sheffield Steel 
Company, Houston, Texas); Charles N. Conner, regional director, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. Department of 
Labor, Atlanta, Georgia; William E. Allen, chairman, SSAC steering committee (secretary -treasurer, Florida AFL-CIO Labor 
Council, Tampa, Florida); William V. Hood, chairman, 21st SSAC host committee (coordinator, Memphis Carpenters' Appren- 
tice Training Program, Memphis, Tennessee); Fred W. Erhard, regional director, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training, U. S. 
Department of Labor. Dallas, Texas; James E. Childs, co-chairman, 21st SSAC host committee (vice-president, Allen and O'Hara, 
Inc., Memphis, Tennessee). 




Graduation Ceremony 
In Chicago Council 

The Chicago District Council held 
apprentice graduation ceremonies March 
27. Sixty young men received certificates. 
They are shown above with officials of 
the Builders Assn. of Chicago, the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Apprenticeship Training, 
and the United Brotherhood. At right, 
District Council President George Vest, 
Jr., presents a certificate to a graduate. 
Also shown are Charles Thompson, 
Council Secretary; First General Vice 
Pres. Finlay C. Allan; and Hugh J. 
McRae, assistant secretary of the Build- 
ing Construction Employers Assn. 




30 



THE CARPENTER 



OF INTEREST TO OUR INDUSTRIAL LOCALS 



WHAT ADVANCE-NOTICE CLAUSES SHOULD CONTAIN 



■ In our last article we discussed 
advance-notice clauses and automation. 
In this article we will talk about what 
advance-notice clauses should contain 
and give you an example of such a 
clause. 

In writing an advance-notice clause, 
as in writing any clause, the language 
should be clear and concise. You 
should cover the situation completely. 
allowing for any contingency. 

After outlining all problems that 
could occur, you must provide rem- 
edies to rectify situations outlined. 

With this in mind you can begin 
to write your advance-notice clause. 

First, you must define what situa- 
tions you wish to cover. Great atten- 
tion should be given to this subject. It 
is not enough to simply specify that ad- 
vance notice shall be given if the firm 
decides to automate. The term auto- 
mation means many things to many 
people, and as stated above, your 
language should be clear and concise. 
You should cover the introduction of 
any labor-saving equipment or de 
engineering methods, modification of 
production, or any reduction in the la- 
bor force. 

Now that we have defined what we 
wish to cover in this clause, we must 
set a length of time for the advance 
notice to be given. In most ca.v. 
least one year should be the period 
of notification. This is usually enough 
time for employees to make necessary 
adjustments, such as retraining, or 
to seek other employment. Also it al- 
lows enough time for negotiations. 

This brings us to the next part of 
our advance-notice clause, the obliga- 
tion to negotiate the proposed chu~ _ >. 
You can have all the advance notice 
vou want, but unless the emplo;. a 
obligated to bargaining over the pro- 
posed changes, the notice is of little or 
no value. 

This section of your clause must be 
coupled with a requirement for the 
company to provide the union with 
complete information regarding the 
proposed changes. This information 



should include, but should not be 

~ i- ' — -;---;- ....-_: : : 
new production methods to be intro- 
duced, number of workers affected 
by the change, the op or down grading 
::' : " :_--;_-:-• •■ -_- -;.• ; -• 
win be opened, skills required for new 
jobs, and proposed rates of pay for 
up-graded or down-graded jobs. 

Last, there should be machinery ; 
up for arbitration if the union and the 
company reach a stalemate in the ne- 
gotiations, or the union should not 
relinquish its right to strike as a means 
of settling the dispute. 

We have now set forth the prin- 
ciples that should be contained in an 
advance -notice clause. Below we have 
printed an advance-notice clause which 
contains these principles. We realize 
that it would be impossible to write an 
advance-notice clause that would fit 
all situations that exist in the various 
shops, mills and factories which have 
an agreement with the United Brother- 
hood. Therefore, this clause is printed 
only to enable you to better under- 
stand the principles involved. Your 
advance-notice clause should incor- 
porate these principles and should be 
tailor-made to reflect the circum- 
stances in your particular plant or 
agreement situation. 

SECTION I. 

The union recognizes the right or 
the company to make technological. 
operational and organisational changes. 
The company recognizes the right of 

lion to establish protective bene- 
fits to minimize the economic hardships 
resulting from such changes. Tech- 
nological, operational and organiza- 
tional changes encompass, but are not 
limited to. the introduction of new ma- 
chinery, equipment, or any labor-sav- 
lerices, as well as any new en- 
gineering methods or any modifica- 
tion of production methods which re- 
sult in a change of the work force, 
either increase or decrease, or the 

-r of employees or change of 
classification of employees. 



SECTION II 



of any intended change or changes re- 
ferred to in Section I of this article. 

5 -•'- -.-•.'.■; ; '-J.- ::-:-- j -. j-j 
-';:-; =• .--_::-• --■-; .-- :'•-• - - - 
posed change or changes, including 
but not limited to, machinery, engi- 
neering, equipment, new production 
methods, or any other change to be 

workers to be affected by such change. 

■:;■■■■• ••'• .-- -_- ' .--: .': :- ; - • - : _ - 
ticipated change is skill level, and any 
other information pertinent to the 

-'J - -: 7 : : -J- - ------ _-_ -.-.-; 

-.'._-- - - .".- _- ._- .- ... _... .-., 

Union with such notice, then the pro- 
posed changes shall not be put into ef- 
fect until one year from the date of 

':-.' ' :=• -';.-; _ - - : • _• j-. 

":. _- ; J.-::J :.?■:- 

SECTION m. 

When the company proposes any 
change or changes as referred to in 
Section I of this article which involve 

* employees or less, it shall 

give 60 days' written notice to the 
Union of such proposed changes. How- 
ever, if such proposed changes in- 
volving or less men would 

require any of the employees involved 
to change their place of residence, then 
the company agrees to give six months' 
written notice to the Union. 

SECTION rv. 

in 10 days following receipt 
of such required notice, the company 
and the Union shall commence nego- 
tiations to establish the protective ben- 
efits and procedures to minimize the 
economic hardships which migh- 
suit from such changes. Any such 
changes cannot be put into effect un- 
til an agreement is reac h ed. Any items 
which cannot be agreed to. shall be 
sub/ect to the normal grievance pro- 
■ 
N -ber or percent should be deter- 

— -•; .' -.■ : *;. — -_".:■ - .- ;.- 

- -". 



MAY. 1969 



31 




> 



Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 



(1) WOODLAND, CALIF. — President 
Delbert Wright recently presented 25- 
year service pins to members of Local 
1381 at a special meeting honoring, left 
to right: Alexander Hunter; Carl Del- 
laquila; Lloyd L. Fleming, recording 
secretary; George Gormley and Arthur 
J. Anderson. 

Other members eligible to receive 
awards, but not in attendance, were 
Glen Claypool, H. A. Cleary, Willis 
Earls, Harry Gravink, Harold Nissen, 
Lonny Scovel, Jack Hollar, Daniel Lucas, 
Chris Reyn, and Robert Tozzi. 

(2) WICHITA, KANSAS— One 50-year 
member and four 25-year members of 
Local 201 were recently presented with 
membership pins at an awards dinner 
held in their honor. Frederick N. Bull, 
Executive Board Member, 6th District 
Council, awards members, left to right: 
Ed Miller (50 years); A. L. Lindenmuth 
(25 years); Theodore Schmuck (25 years); 
Alvin Weideman (25 years); and W. W. 
Martin (25 years). Members who were 
not present to receive their awards were 





William Carlton, S. F. Dasher, Arthur 
Dennis, Monroe Douglas, E. L. Dugas, 
Youal Hayes, Ralph Lyon, Norman 
Wohlford and Martin Pinaire. 

Howard J. Lane was master of cere- 
monies, and out-of-town speakers included 
Charles E. Miller, secretary-treasurer, 
Kansas State District Council; and Fred- 
erick N. Bull. 

(3) ANDERSON, IND. — Six members 
were presented with 25-year service pins 
at a special meeting held at the head- 
quarters of Local 352. Seated, left to 
right: Don Wainscott (27 years); Herman 
Fisher (27 years); David Geyer (26 years); 



and Everett Elsenrath (35 years). Stand- 
ing, left to right: Paul R. Hull, commit- 
tee member; Don Large (28 years); Joe 
Carroll, president; Vernon Hannah, re- 
cording secretary; John Wheeldon, com- 
mittee member; and A. E. Woods (28 
years). 

Members of Local 352 eligible to re- 
ceive awards, but unable to attend the 
pin presentation ceremonies, were C. E. 
Brown (28 years); Cecil Faris (27 years); 
Marshall Faris (25 years); Clarence Swift 
(26 years); Samuel Gray (56 years); Ed 
Stevens (48 years); and Albert Willis 
(34 years). 




32 



THE CARPENTER 1 




(4) OTTAWA, ONT.— Local 93 held a 
special meeting recently honoring those 
members who have achieved 25 years of 
active service in the Brotherhood. Twenty- 
five-year pin recipients are pictured, left 
to right: Amede Levesque, Marc Landry, 
Rene Bisson, Stanley Moore, Joseph 
Petrukowich, Albert LaLonde, and Rene 
Lebrun. The awards were presented by 
senior officers Albert LaLonde and Marc 
Landry. 

(4A) Robert Thompson, secretary, was 
presented with a silver tray from Albert 
LaLonde, international representative, in 
appreciation for his outstanding services 
as secretary of Local 93 for more than 
20 years. 

(4B) Officers and business representa- 
tives of Local 93 arc seated, left to right: 
Mark McKenny, business representative; 
Marc Landry, president; Wilfrid Chretien, 
vice president; W. H. "Harry" Birming- 
ham, financial secretary; Lawrence Saw- 
yer, treasurer; and Albert LaLonde, 
international representative. Standing, 
left to right: William Guignc, trustee, 
Robert Thompson, recording secretary; 
William Todd, conductor; George Hop- 
pin, warden; Alvin Browncll and Joseph 
O. LaLonde, trustees. 



(5) MAYWOOD, CALIF.— Four mem- 
bers of Furniture Workers Local 3161 
were awarded 25-year membership pins 
late last year. Pictured, left to right: 
Frank Sanchez, president, presenting 
awards to Carlos Aquilar, Hilda Loomis, 
Frank Macias, and Celestino Ramirez. 



Brothers unable to attend the cere- 
monies, but eligible to receive 25-year 
emblems, were: Harold Bell, Jesus 
Bojorques, James Chipp, Sam Liberto, 
Salvador Munoz, and Horace Taylor. 

Following a short business meeting and 
the pin presentation, members of Local 
3161 enjoyed a delicious buifet supper. 




MAY, 1969 



33 




(6) ARLINGTON, TEXAS— Local 1421 
(Millwright & Machinery Erectors) 
recently honored eleven 25-year members 
at a special pin presentation ceremony. 
Wives and families of the members were 
invited to attend the affair. 

Paul H. Anderson is seated in the 
photograph. Standing, left to right, are: 
Charles M. Campau, International Rep- 
resentative; C. R. Holder; Gerry L. 
Wagnon; Floyd W. Durham; C. M. 
Yeatts, Jr.; Royce H. Allen; D. W. Sea- 
bolt; and Leon F. Pierce, business rep- 
resentative. 

Other members of Local 1421 unable 
to attend the ceremonies included: 
Charles H. Graff, F. Lee Hardin, Wayne 
Johnson and Leonard W. Wilson. 

Charles M. Campau, Local 1421, 
presented pins to each member attending, 
and refreshments were served following 
the presentation of awards. A large cake 
was specially prepared for the occasion. 

(7) MANCHESTER, NEW HAMP- 
SHIRE — Three membership pins were 
presented to veterans of Local 1688 
(Millmen) at a recent meeting. Merton 
Campbell received a 30-year service pin 
and Alvin Neubert and Richard Smith 



were recipients of 25-year pins. Pictured, 
left to right: Arthur Gimas, local presi- 
dent, presenting awards to Alvin Neubert, 
Merton Campbell and Richard Smith. 
Absent from the photograph and eligible 
to receive 25-year membership pins were 
Peter Meindl and Leonard Yanez. (Photo 
courtesy The Manchester Union-Leader). 
Guest speaker at the session of Local 
1688 was Ken Klene, general manager of 
Hermsdorf Fixture Company. New mem- 
bers sworn in at the ceremonies were Paul 
Doyon, William Grant, Kenneth Heiring, 
Richard Heiring and Roger Racette. Ray- 
mond Paquette was elected treasurer of 
the local, and Arthur Gimas, president, 
presided at the meeting. 

(8) WILMINGTON, CALIF. — Thirty- 
one members of Local 1335 (Ship Car- 
penters, Joiners and Caulkers) were 
recently awarded 25-year membership 
emblems at "Pin Award Night" festivities 
held at the Wilmington headquarters. 

Recipients of 25-year pins are pictured, 
seated, left to right: Lauri Naapila; Dan 
Bcmmelje; Harold Huskey; Walter I. 
Hayes, oldest member honored; Mate 
Yukov; Davis N. Jones; James Skelton, 
veteran member of Local 946 and a 




former District Council business repre- 
sentative; George Thomsen; Ray Yoakum; 
and John Hoerner. Second row, left to 
right: Dale M. Bailey, business representa- 
tive; Earl Terry; Charles Ducan; Don 
Van Meter; William Hunt; Emil Ander- 
son; Henry Poellot; Daniel Murray; 
Alton Page; Thomas Smith; Harland 
Wright; and Orville L. Carraway. Back 
row, left to right: Wallace Blatt; Ernest 
Partridge; David Wells; Curtis Harrison; 
Archie Paterson; Phillip Florine; Howard 
Smith; Everett Johnson; Jack Milliard; 
and Thomas O. O'Neal. The awards 
were presented by James Skelton. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMORIAM 



I..U. NO. 1, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Diekelmann, Carl 
Gutbier, Bruno 
Rudolph. Louis 
Sagmcister. Vincent 
Stanley, Anton 
StefTey. Roy 
Voss, George 

L.U. NO. 10, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Dorsey. Roy J. 
Guger, Mike 
Knudsen, Martin 
Mosher, James K. 
Rudolph. Eugene H. 
Tapley, Lawrence 
Vinci, Nick 

L.U. NO. 15. 
HACKENSACK, NJ. 

BIcmendaal, Peter 
Pcpe, Rocco 

I..U. NO. 23, 
DOVER, NJ. 

Gallo, Vincent 

1..U. NO. 34, 
SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIF. 

Brown, Walter 
Burnside. M. R. 
Burrows. F. J. 
Bybee. Ellis 
Comiskey, William 
Duke, Leslie 
Erwin, Joseph 
Frasier, R .W. 
Groskoff, Irving 
Hagedohm. William C. 
Hughes, Charles R. 
Hunt, Jim 
Johanson, H. A. 
Laub, George 
Lehman. Ernest 
Leonard. Ralph 
Lcssard. John 
Luchessi, John 
Miller, Max 
Mitchell, William 
Moulton, William 
Murphy. Arnold 
Olson. Harry 
O'Neal, George 
I'atton, L. N. 
Paulson. Ray 
Pollack. Irving 
Presto. Paul 
Ramsey, C. D. 
Roberson, R. E. 
Schnittgrund, Ralph 
Smith, Frank 
Thorwald, Ona P. 
Tonini. Pares 
Wise, Fred 

L.U. NO. 35, 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIF. 

Edwards, Floyd 



L.U. NO. 40. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

DeKow, Fred 
Levangie, William 
Melanson, Arthur 
Pearson, John 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Reeser, Robert 
Stamps. Vance 
Townsend. Paul 
White, Robert 

I..U. NO. 51, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Antonuccio, Salvy 
Saroff. Hyman 

L.U. NO. 53, 

WHITE PLAINS. N.Y. 

Franck, Edward 
McGlasson. Robert 
Peterson. Einar 

L.U. NO. 65, 
PERTH AMBOY, N.J. 

Shipkin. Hyman 
Nielsen, Albert 

L.U. NO. 77, 

PORT CHESTER, N.Y. 

Engelstad, Fritz 
Prata. Anthony 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Collison, George T. 
Darney. John H. 
Hall. Robert S. 
Meadows. Bernard O. 
Turner, John W. 
Williamson, Robert 

L.U. NO. 121, 
V1NELAND. N.J. 

Walker. Alfred 

L.U. NO. 129, 
HAZLETON. PA. 

Goodall, George E. 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON. D.C. 

Johnson. Aubrey W. 
Judge. Lawrence 
Ttirney. Gilmore F. 

I..U. NO. 153, 
HELENA, MONT. 

Benson, Wallace R. 
De Tour. Edward 

I..U. NO. 155. 

PI AINFIEI D. NJ. 

ll.irlin, Edwin 
Kennedy, James E. 
Marlin, Andrew J. 



L.U. NO. 176. 
NEWPORT, R.I. 

Morrow, John 
Perlingiero, Pasquale 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Allendorfer, Fay 
Johnson, Eric H. 
Sorbers, John L. 

I..U. NO. 185, 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Karr, Ralph 
Smythe, James L. 

L.U. NO. 188, 
YONKERS, N.Y. 

Colonna, Michael 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Jones. Curtis F. 
Mims, Ben, Sr. 
Trull, Jeff 

L.U. NO. 200. 
COLUMBUS. OHIO 

Dennis, K. H. 
Hemingway. Lois 
Monroe, Herschel 
Plants, Donald 

L.U. NO. 207, 
CHESTER, PA. 

Feist. William 
Sewerd, George B. 

L.U. NO. 218. 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Garrett, Raymond 
Comeau, Freeman 

I..U. NO. 226. 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Freeden, E. A. 
Hill, Harry 
Olson, Rudolph 
Taylor, John M. 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Svanda. Nicholas 

I..U. NO. 272, 
CHICAGO HEIGHTS, 
ILL. 

Zander, George T. 

L.U. NO. 278, 
WATERTOWN, N.Y. 

Wells, rheodore F. 

I .1. NO. 284. 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

Battista, Joseph 
Mull. me, Joseph 
Nora. Marino 
Thomsen, Otto 



L.U. NO. 322. 
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. 

Clemenger, William 
Hopkins, Alex 
Miller, Fred 
Olson. Fred 
Sullivan, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 355, 
BUFFALO. N.Y. 

Piechocki, Joseph 

L.U. NO. 359. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Inacker, Henry J- 
Zarenkiewiez. Thaddeus 

L.U. NO. 366, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Levine, Elias 

L.U. NO. 385, 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

Bellavia, Charles 
Chmar. A. J. 
Cioffi. Emilio 
Dalidda, Peter 
DeDea, John 
Gargiula. Anthony 
Leishman. David 
I.uppi, William 
Mango, Anthony 
McLean, Kenneth 
Olivo, Angelo 
Prokopiak. Joseph 
Pienkowski. Stanley 
Polizzano. Clino 
Shesko. Michael 
Williams, Clarence 
Zaretsky, Isadore 

I..U. NO. 429, 
MONTCLAIR, NJ. 

Collerd, Alferd 
Jelstrom. Hilding 
Lougheed, Samuel 
McChesney. Raymond 
Ruggerio. Michael 

L.U. NO. 488. 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

Jackl. Frederick 
Kaljot, Elmar 
Laisi, Martin 
Nier, William 
Williams. Archie 

L.U. NO. 517, 
PORTLAND. ME. 

Downs, Harry 
Galbraith. Wesley 
Jackson, John C. 
Knn, in. Ignatius 
McCrum, James 
Olsen, Herbert 
Therio. Ernest 
Tyler, Arthur 
Valente. Michael 



L.U. NO. 584. 
NEW ORLEANS. 

Di Carlo. Joseph 
Rodcr, Oscar R. 



LA. 



L.U. NO. 620, 
MADISON, NJ. 

Blatt, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 696, 
TAMPA, FLA. 

Bryant, E. E. 
Christmas, C. D. 
Corbitt. J. M. 
Jones, S. L. 
Keene, M. W. 
Peterson. M. H. 
Schow, E. N. 
Studstill, Zebra 
Whitt, L. E. 

L.U. NO. 715. 
ELIZABETH, NJ. 

Aakjer, George 
Bowers, Richmond 
Byleir, Sigler 
Currie, Robert. Sr. 
Johns. William E. 
Pischedda. Raymond 
Schwarz. Paul 
Zingler, Fred 

L.U. NO. 764. 
SHREVEPORT, LA. 

Addison, W. F. 
Allwhite, L. G. 
Ashley, E. M. 
Barmore, Joseph B. 
Barnes. Carl L. 
Boynton. F. M. 
Brooks, Louis M. 
Carter, C. K„ Sr. 
Chance. Lee 
Crutchfield. H. L. 
Davenport, Claude C. 
Hardwick. H. V. 
Hastings, Carl H. 
Hernandez. Felix 
Hightower, W. C. 
Hill, Ben F. 
Lambert. Dave O. 
Long, Charles B. 
Loy. E. D. 
McKinley, H. J. 
Madden. Otto 
Mitchell. Strother 
Nugent. J. D. 
Oden. R. H. 
Phillips. H. J. 
Rowlen, K. F. 
Scott. Floyd M. 
Scriber. E. F. 
Simpson. M. O. 
Smith. R. E. 
Stephenson. L. H. 
Thaxton. Jim B. 
Walker. Earl R 
Whitten, Millard F. 
Wimberly, Teer 

1 .1 . NO. 950, 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

1 emvre. Ambrose 

I .1 . NO. 956. 
NEW YORK. N.Y. 

Wapper, John 

Continued on Page 36 



MAY. 1969 



35 



IN MEMORIAM « 



L.U. NO. 982, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Armstrong, Roy 

L.U. NO. 1006, 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. 

Arman, Steve 
Bean, Albin 
Eastland, Arthur 
Jenniker, August 
Keegan, Eugene, Sr. 
Wilson, George 
Yoerg, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1020, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Goodwin, Lloyd E. 

L.U. NO. 1022, 
PARSONS, KANS. 

Foster, Robert L. 
Shaw, Jack Lee 

L.U. NO. 1093, 
GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Hopp, Anders 

L.U. NO. 1098, 
BATON ROUGE, LA. 

Haslip, John R. 

L.U. NO. 1128, 
LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Brodie, Fred 

L.U. NO. 1266, 
AUSTIN, TEX. 



Whisenant, Doyle C. 

L.U. NO. 1292, 
HUNTINGTON, N.Y. 

Horn, Frank 

L.U. NO. 1302, 

NEW LONDON, CONN. 

Nyvelt, Albert 

L.U. NO. 1394, 

FT. LAUDERDALE, 

FLA. 

Aubel, Paul J. 
Heath, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 1397, 
NORTH HEMPSTEAD, 

N.Y. 

Traynor, James 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Latimer, W. C. 
Machen, W. G., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1433, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Edwardson, Peter 
Hamilton. James 
Krause, Walter 
McCague, H. C. 
Megdan, John 
Peake. Garry 
Poynter, Fred S. 
Salyer, Richmond 



Schoeneberger, Adolf 
Zacharski, Chester 

L.U. NO. 1449, 
LANSING, MICH. 

Colegrove, Don 
Lowe, Lewis 

L.U. NO. 1483, 
PATCHOGUE, N.Y. 

Carter, David 
Furman. Thomas 
Lindtvit, Terkel 

L.U. NO. 1511, 
SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. 

Lingwood, Raymond 

L.U. NO. 1598, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Croft, James J. 

L.U. NO. 1667, 
BILOXI, MISS. 

Raley, Calvin 

L.U. NO. 1725, 
DAYTONA BEACH, 
FLA. 

Avery, Ace 
Carter, Elmer T. 
St. John, Cleon 
Whitely, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 1772, 
HICKSV1LLE, N.Y. 



Clement, Carmine 
Fitzroy, Samuel, Sr. 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FT. WORTH, TEX. 

Finch, Norman O. 

L.U. NO. 1846, 
NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Hatfield, H. E. 
Molero, Vincent M. 
Nuessly, Herbert J. 
Porche, Isaac 
Walker, Gerald 

L.U. NO. 1921, 
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. 
Alia, Rudolph 
Anderson, Steve 
Carlsen, Ted 
Davis, Winfield 
Klink, Buddy 
Mosely, Eugene 
Palk, William 
Ponichter, Stanley 
Raccuglia, Frank 
Semke, John 
Shelly, David 
Sheriff, Irving 
Southard, Joseph 
Stefansen, Joseph 
Stein, Gunther 
Tomins, Janis 
Vetter, Irving 
Wellington. Steven 

L.U. NO. 1966, 
MIAMI, FLA. 

Maxwell, Alvin F. 



L.U. NO. 2094, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Galullo, Joseph 
Manachek, Paul 

L.U. NO. 2101, 
MOOREFIELD, W.VA. 

Miller, Field J. 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Anderson, William R. 
Noel, W. G. 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Brandt, Elmer 

L.U. NO. 2415, 
VICTORIA, B.C. 

Ash, Roy L. 

L.U. NO. 2466, 
PEMBROKE, ONT. 

Klingbiel, A. 

L.U. NO. 2710, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Busam, William 
Fiero, Fred 
Minnevaggi, James 

L.U. NO. 3127, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Spradley, Ernest 



RETIRED CARPENTERS! 

Are you looking for part-time work? The 
only machine that files hand, band, com- 
bination and crosscut circular saws is the 



FOLEY 



AUTOMATIC 



SAW FILER 



When you are no longer on a full-time regular job, perhaps 
you would like something to do for a few hours a day and pick 
up a little extra money, too. Your carpenter friends would be 
glad to have you sharpen their saws for them, especially with 
the precision work done by the Foley Saw Filer. F. M. Davis 
wrote us: "After filing saws by hand for 12 years, the Foley Saw 
Filer betters my best in half the time." Exclusive jointing action 
keeps teeth uniform in size, height, spacing — and new model 
Foley Saw Filer is the only machine that sharpens hand, band, 
both combination and crosscut circular saws. 

WRITE FOR INFORMATION 

You can set up a Foley Saw Filer in your garage 
or basement. A small cash payment will put a 
Foley in your hands, and you can handle monthly 
payments with the cash you take in. Operating 
expense is low — only li- for files and electricity to 
turn out a $1.00 or $1.50 saw filing job. Send us 
your name and address on coupon for complete 
information on the Foley Saw Filer. 




FOLEY MFG. CO. 518-9 Foley Blclp... Minneapolis, Minn. 55418 
Please send literature on Foley Saw Filer and Time Payment Plan. 



FOR FREE 
BOOKLET 


NAME 


ADDRESS 





36 



THE CARPENTER 




CEDAR SHINGLE IDEAS 




..it J 



Textured elegance is the result of using 
Shakertown "Fancy Butt" red cedar shin- 
gles. Shakertown Corporation has pub- 
lished literature describing the ten "Fancy 
Butt" shingle designs and how they can 
be employed to enhance both modern 
exterior architecture and interior decor 
with the warmth of wood. For the litera- 
ture, write Shakertown Corporation. 4416 
Lee Road, Cleveland. Ohio. 44128 or 
Post Office Box 400. Winlock. Washing- 
ton. 98596. 



IMPROVED SAW FILER 




The new Model 387 Foley Automatic 
Filer has a 50 per cent longer file stroke 
which increases the efficiency of the files 
and speeds saw sharpening process. 

The new Foley Filer features more 
rugged construction: a larger, stronger 
file arm. heavier base and wing frame 
construction; an all-new. strengthened 
rocker arm design which givts a wider 
range of feed pawl travel lengths. Larger, 
easier-to-handle adjustment knobs and 
self-locking screws have been incorpo- 
rated throughout for faster set-up and 
adjustment-free operation. 

It accurately sharpens all crosscut cir- 
cular saws with evenly spaced V-shaped 
teeth; circular rip saws, combination cir- 
cular saws; band saws up to 4Vi" wide 
and 24" long; carpenters' hand saws, both 
straight edged and crowned, either rip or 
crosscut including back and miter box; 
plus meat saw blades. It will handle 
circular saws from 4" to 24" in diameter. 

The new Foley Filer is designed to 
provide all necessary filing angles. Gives 
hook, tooth face and top bevels — accu- 
rately duplicates original tooth character- 
istics. 

For more information about the new 
Foley Automatic Saw Filer Model 387 
contact; Foley Manufacturing Company, 
3300 Fifth Street N.E., Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota 55418. 

BACK-PACK TOOL BOX 




A new improved automatic saw filer 
has been developed by Foley Manufac- 
turing Company. Minneapolis that is 50 
per cent more efficient. 



Back-pack tool boxes will soon be 
union made. The Back Pack Tool Box 
Company is in the process of signing a 
contract with Local 98 of the Carpenter 
Union in Spokane and has been working 
with L. E. Bartels, financial secretary. 

The tool boxes are made from 50-52 
aluminum, approximately 60 gauge. The 
corners are heli-arc welded for strength. 
The fillers are made from '« in. masonite 
with Wi in. industrial elastic holders, 
snap riveted. Back pack belts are made 
from I Vi in. waterproof webbing with 
safety buckles. 

The box is designed for all carpenters, 
dam and bridge workers, as well as 
house builders. It holds a complete line 
of any major brand of hand tool for 
carpenters. List enclosed. 

This box is superior to the old type 
of carpenter box, because il can easily be 
carried anywhere, ihe hack pack feature 
is for men working in high places en- 
abling them to use both hands for climb- 
ing ladders, etc. The box can also be 



carried like a suitcase. It is very com- 
pact and easy to use. All tools can be 
seen at a glance and easily removed. This 
box weighs only 44'/i lbs. completely 
stocked. It is 14 in. wide, 34 in. long 
and 4 in. thick. It retails for S32.50. For 
more information write: Back Pack Tool 
Box Company, Cusick, Washington 
99119. 

CHAIN SAW CASE 




The famous Remington SL-9 light- 
weight chain saw now has its own carry- 
ing case. This rugged plastic case was 
designed by Remington to protect the 
saw, give it greater portability, and make 
it easier to stow neatly into a car trunk 
with other camping or sports equipment 
and luggage. 

The case snaps around the contours of 
the saw itself, with the saw handle serv- 
ing as a handle for both. 

Among other things, the carrying case 
keeps the saw clean when not in use, 
keeps the chain sharp, and generally 
protects the saw during storage and 
transporting. With nothing but the saw 
handle exposed, the saw can be strapped 
safely to a hiker's pack board. Having 
the saw in the case also eliminates pos- 
sible damage from the saw to clothing or 
other equipment packed alongside the 
saw in a car or other vehicle. 

The case is available at a suggested 
retail price of $19.95 from Remington 
Chain Saw Dealers. 

For additional information, contact: 
Remington Arms Company. Inc.. 25000 
South Western Ave.. Park Forest, Illinois. 

CRAFTS CATALOG 

The Craftool Company, manufacturer 
of the broadest program of tools and 
equipment for the Creative Crafts has 
released their new 144 page catalog No. 
70. 

The catalog is available at no charge 
to art and industrial art teachers request- 
ing it on their school letterhead. It may 
be purchased by interested artists and 
craft enthusiasts by sending SI. 00 to 
The Craftool Company Dept. 70-AEM, 
1 Industrial Rd., Wood-Ridge. N.J. 
07075. 

The Craftool Program covers these 
major craft areas of Ceramics, Graphics, 
lapidary (Gem Cutting & Polishing), 
Sculpture. Art Metal (Jewelry). Book- 
binding. Papermaking, Craft Work 
Benches, Weaving. Batik plus Book-- and 
Publications devoted to these subjects. 



MAY. 1969 



37 




RAIL SPLITTER 

The picture above, is from a political 
campaign poster of 1860. It shows Abra- 
ham Lincoln using a maul and a wedge 
to split rails. Ken looker, retired member 
of Local 203, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., called 
the picture to our attention when he saw 
the February CARPENTER cover, show- 
ing Lincoln with a metal axe. (Our Feb- 
ruary cover was supplied by the Library 
of Congress.) The picture below shows 
a "Lincoln rail splitter" which has been 
in the Tooker family for more than 125 
years. Any further information on the 
subject, anyone? 




INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel, Theodore 27 

Chicago Technical College .... 11 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 24 

Estwing Manufacturing 26 

Foley Manufacturing 36 

Hydrolevel 19 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 19 

K&R Enterprises 22 

Lee, H. D 27 

Locksmithing Institute 39 

Lufkin Rule Co 13 

North American School of 

Drafting 39 

Riechers. A 24 

Stanley Works Back Cover 

True Temper 20 

Vaughan & Bushnell 24 

Wen Products, Inc 14 



—LAKELAND NEWS — 

Berry Bellamy, Local 599, Hammond, Indiana, arrived at the Home March 3, 
1969. 

Savo Gojkovic, Local 2155, New York, N. Y. arrived at the Home March 21, 1969. 

Frank Stahl, Local 13, Chicago, Illinois, died March 9, 1969. Burial was at 
Cassville, Missouri. 

Edwin Johnson, Local 1665, Alexandria, Virginia, died March 31, 1969. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Visitors to the Home during March, 1969: 



John A. Lang, Katonah, N.Y. Local 
1134. 

Wayne Cochran, Merriam, Kans. Lo- 
cal 61. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Gamberling, Great 
Falls, Mont. Local 286. 

Rudy Stein, Loveland, Ohio. Local 
854. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Konratts, 3930 
N. Oconta. Local 242. 

Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Kimball, Parma, 
Ohio. Local 404. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Krame, Sr., St. 
Louis, Mo. Local 47. 

John A. Reed, Duxbury, Mass. Local 
1531. 

Clyde C. Powell, Louisville, Ohio. Lo- 
cal 639. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Johnson, Wilmette, 
111. Local 1307. 

Henry Clum, Albany, N.Y. Local 117. 

Alf G. Gundersen. Chicago, 111. Local 
80. 

Robert Wittmer, St. Paul, Minn. Local 
87. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Deckett, Harris- 
burg, Pa. Local 287. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Scott, Wood- 
ridge, N.J. Local 2212. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Maeix, Hudson. 111. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Koeding, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. Local 548. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Anderson, Skokie, 
111. Local 58. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ole Larsen, New City, 
N. Y. Local 787. 

H. Marcussen, Richmond, Virginia. 
Local 388. 

Siegfried Gumert, N. Y.C. Local 488. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Larson, Chicago, 
111. Local 58. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wilkerson, St. Louis, 
Mo. Local 5. 

George W. Shaffer, Pinellas Park, 
Fla. Local 531. 

Frank Takacs, Bridgeport, Conn. Lo- 
cal 115. 

D. L. Noble, London, Ont., Can. Local 
1946. 

John McCarthy, Carmel and Kent, 
N.Y. Local 1704. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Packard, Cas- 
leton, N.Y. 

Mrs. Alton L. Lemka, Bradenton, Fla. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Eulstu, Sr., Gam- 
brill, Md. Local 132. 

Joseph J. Prerle, Snyder, N. Y. Local 
440. 

Paul H. Grace, Everson, Pa. Local 430. 

Helmer G. Anderson, Spencer, Mass. 
Local 107. 

Raymond P. Kelly, Kensington, Md. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Pearson, Gorden 
Prairie, 111. Local 792. 

L. E. Tucker, Madisonville, Ky. Local 
2310. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Heay, Cuba, 
Ohio. 

Joseph F. Eilert, Oakland, N. J. Local 
488. N.Y.C. 



Ernest Carlson, Jamestown, N. Y. Lo- 
cal 66. 

Samuel Hutka, Eden, N. Y. Local 
1345. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Schweighardt, 
Inglewood, Calif. Local 2435. 

Elmer J. Catlan, Watertown, N. Y. 
Local 278. 

George W. Chorny, Uniondale, N.Y. 
Local 1397. 

A. Lawrence Johnson, Minneapolis, 
Minn. Local 7 and Local 3624. 

Jack Nottle, Washington, D. C. Local 
1590. 

Henry F. Bates, Braintree, Mass. Local 
1550. 

T. L. Wales, Gary, Ind. Local 985. 

Clyde C. Powell, Akron, Ohio. Local 
639. 

Earl M. Laughlin, Windsor, Ont. Local 
494. 

Dugald A. Smith, Dearborn, Mich. 
Local 377. 

Emil Basler, Highland, 111. Local 1535. 

Archie Johnson, Norwalk, Conn. Lo- 
cal 746. 

Leslie H. Branot, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Local 60. 

Robert Hackenberger, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Local 287. 

Elmar Reinke, Itasca, 111. Local 2004. 

D. V. Zehner, Knoxville, Tenn. Local 
50. 

Charles D. Hussey, Rochester, N. H. 
Local 1031. 

Frank Stromger, Stony Brook, N. Y. 
Local 1135. 

Alex Mac Lennan, Sheridan, Wyo. 
Local 1384. 

Gustaf Sala, North Woodstock, Conn. 
Local 825. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Darby, Brooklawn 
Apts., Frederick, Md. Local 132. 

Paul E. Tillman, Highland Park, 111. 
Local 461. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Matthews, Delray 
Beach, Fla. Local 1397. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. N. Fowler, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Local 132. 

Mr. and Mrs. Keith Reichard, Craw- 
fordsville, Ind. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Montante and family, 
Detroit, Mich. Local 19. 

Ralph J. Kassner, Patchogue, L. I., 
N.Y. Local 1483. 

Charles Donald LaBarre, Conklin, 
N.Y. Local 281. 

Charles LaBarre, Sr., Conklin, N.Y. 
Local 281. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Hovanec, St. Pete 
Beach, Fla. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Trantham, Min- 
neapolis, Minn. Local 7. 

Vein Suly, Ogdensburg, N. Y. Local 
128. 

William Schwerin, Elk Grove, 111. Lo- 
cal 2014. 

Mr. and Mrs. Llewellyn Morgan, 
Toronto, Ont., Can. Local 27. 

Julius L. Holzer and wife, Baltimore, 
Md. Local 101. 

Karl Soder, Winter Haven, Fla. 



38 



THE CARPENTER 



LAKELAXD NEWS, coirtv 



Alfons Juthmas, Norwalk, Conn. 

Andrew Krieg, Ridgway, Pa. Local 
947. 

Chauncy Soufner, Stamford, Conn. 
Loeal 210. 

Charles Olmstead, Wilton, Conn. Local 
210. 

Henry Staalsen, Chicago, 111. Local 
181. 

B. T. Laiham, Burford, Ont. Can. 
E. Tfilchen, Burford, Ont., Can. 

J. Tfilchen, Burford, Ont., Can. 

Ben Whitehurst, Wash., D. C. Local 
1590. 

Glenn W. Teeter and wife, Cortland, 
N. Y. Local 1019. 

Einar J. Roslee, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Local 1865. 

Daniel McNeil. Jacksonville, Fla. Local 
627. 

Wm. P. Smith. Knoxville. Tenn. Local 
50. 

Ivor Anderson, Pleasantville, N.Y. 
Local 1115. 

Fernie F. Smith, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Local 2075. 

Lionel J. Richard, Port Chester, N. Y. 
Local 350. 

Fred Stellingwerf, East Paterson, N. J. 
Local 490. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin H. Givson, Cort- 
land. N.Y. Local 1019. 

John Lamont, Jr., Willoughby, Ohio. 
Local 404. 

Chancey Yager, Midland, Mich. Lo- 
cal 1654. 

Andrew Toth, Hamilton, Ohio. Local 
104. 

L. J. Bunch, Alamosa, Colo. 

Glen Bunch, Alamosa, Colo. 

T. R. Bunch, Alamosa, Colo. 

Martin Johannson, Gary, Ind. 

Almya Seckinger, Gainsville, Fla. Lo- 
cal 1278. 

James Ritter, Van Nuys, Calif. Local 
1913. 

C. A. Asbury, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio. Lo- 
cal 182. 

S. John Shott, Bedford, Ohio. Local 
1991. 

Bill Saffer, Portland. Ore. Local 3182. 

John Wm. Anderson, Inverness, Fla. 
Local 791 and 203. 

Henry Overeem, N. J. Local 325. 

C. Chuck Tomazic, Cleveland. Ohio. 
Local 11. 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Hill, Tomas 
River, N.J. Local 349. 

W. F. True, Browns, 111. Local 1188. 

Carl Hagen, Buffalo, N.Y. Local 374. 

Rev. Gordon R. Binder, Lockport, 
N. Y. 

Robert J. Truce, Randolph, Mass. Lo- 
cal 33. 

Arthur F. W. Johnson. Ruch City, 
Minn. 

Joe Schaafman, Chicago, III. Local 
113. 

Leo Laney, Blue Island. III. Local 1539. 

Hans Preiss, Detroit, Mich. Local 337. 

Vernon Donald, Huntington, W. Va. 
Local 302. 

Alvan Donald and wife, Huntington, 
W. Va. Local 302. 

Wm. DeWolff and wife, Kalamazoo, 
Mich. Local 257. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Foreman. Sara- 
sota, Fla. Local 257. 

Andrew E. Andersen and wife, Buffalo, 
N. Y. Local 440. 

Tonto Szabo. Lodi, N.J. Local 325. 



Ernest Nelson, Chicago, 111. Local 
2094. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clair S. Worstell, Beaver 
Falls, Pa. Local 422. 

Louis J. Ebner, Sr., Glenfield, Pa. Lo- 
cal 211. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Healker, Miami 
and Pallsburg, Pa. Local 165. 

Oscar Peterson, Chicago, 111. Local 62. 

Evert Nordin, N. Y. Local 488. 

Tom Kuiper, Muskegon, Mich. Local 
824. 

Earl R. Colli, Warren, Ohio. Local 
1438. 

Bernard Janrosy, West Bank, Wise. 
Local 2283. 

Fred A. Snowden, East Liverpool, 
Ohio. Local 1189. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Olson, W. 
Orange, N. J. Local 349. 

Mrs. Ralph Brye, Rochester, N. Y. Lo- 
cal 72. 

Mrs. John A. Johnson, Rochester, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray C. Bomark and 
daughter, Detroit, Mich. Local 1433. 

Mr. Edward E. Evans, Battle Creek, 
Mich. Local 871. 

Paul Wilkes, Cleveland, Ohio Local 11. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex Hill, Whitemouth, 
Mani., Can. Local 343. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Hill, Vancouver, 
B.C., Can. 

William A. Parrish. Sheffield, Ala. Lo- 
cal 109. 

Clyde Strawser, Columbus, Ohio. Lo- 
cal 200. 

Charles E. Williamson, Cochranton. 
Penna. Local 556. 

Arthur E. Gustafson. Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Local 2236. 

Frank Sutton, Michalpent. 

Roland C. Full, Amboy, 111. 

Jacob O. Full, Amboy, 111. 

Leo R. Proulx, Manchester, N. H. Lo- 
cal 625. 

Iver Swanson, Dundee, Fla. Local 
1456. 

DeWitt Bowman, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Local 25. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Krowczyk, Itasca. 
111. Local 113. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benno Sudler, Newark. 
N.J. Local 119. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bela Csanda, Chicago, 
111. 

Mr. and Mrs. K. Muller, St. Pete. Fla. 

Mr. Ralph Wicklund, Bethany, Conn. 
Local 2236. 

Mr. Benhard Darmstadter, Marathon, 
Fla. Local 1447. 

Larin J. Anderson, Chicago, 111. Local 
58. 

Richard Hanson, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Local 58. 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy Turner, Jr.. 
Irvington, N.J. Local 349. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Garraty, Nor- 
wood, Pa. Local 845. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Garraty, Pros- 
pect Park, Pa. Local 160. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Garraty, Ridley 
Park. Pa. (U. Bro. of Funeral Workers) 

Frederick S. Carver, Mentor, Ohio. 
Local 404. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Hofreitcr, 703 E. 
Nebr. Ave.. Peoria. 111. Local 183. 

Albert DeBauch, Green Bay, Wise. Lo- 
cal 1146. 

Lloyd Womack, Miles, Mich. Local 
1033. 

William Sievers, Master Beach, N. Y. 
Local 1483. 




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39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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33.5 Million Man-Days Lost in One Year to Accidents 



■ News media seldom pay any attention to the 
efforts of organized labor to obtain safer working 
conditions. They dutifully report the facts when 
hundreds of miners are buried alive due to unsafe 
working conditions or a number of construction 
workers die in the collapse of a structure. But 
when workers walk off the job in protest ... ah! 
that's a different story! Don't ask if the press 
ever follows up to see that strict mine inspections 
are made. It seldom does. 

The Brotherhood and the rest of organized labor 
in the construction trades currently are seeking 
enactment of a construction safety bill in Congress. 
Since 1959, there has never been a year wherein 
fewer than 2,300 construction workers were killed 
on the job and at least 209.000 suffered significant 
injuries. 

In testifying in favor of the pending legislation, 
President C.J. Haggerty of the AFL-CIO Building 
and Construction Trades Department pointed out 
that the entire work force of the U. S. lost 42 mil- 
lion man-days of production because of strikes 
during 1967. But. the president of the Building 
and Construction Trades Department pointed out, 
in the same period construction workers alone lost 
33.5 million man-days of work because of dis- 
abling accidents! 

The news media often blast workers for their re- 
fusal to work because of unacceptable pay or unfair 
working conditions. But few become agitated over 
the monumental amount of human misery caused 
by and wages lost through on-the-job accidents. 

Construction workers definitely need more ac- 
cident protection. The accident rate for all indus- 
try is 6.91 accidents per million man-hours worked. 



The accident rate for the construction trades is 
almost twice that; 12.24 per million man-hours. 
That tells the story! 

The simple truth is that many managements feel 
it is cheaper to pay workmen's compensation costs 
than it is to spend money to provide safe working 
conditions. 

However, this has been challenged as a short- 
sighted point of view by Esther Peterson, former 
Assistant Secretary of Labor under both Presidents 
Kennedy and Johnson. She said: "I am convinced 
that if the money is invested (in safety) we will 
save it in insurance, we will save it in compensa- 
tion . . . not to mention what we will save in terms 
of human values." 

Last year there were more than 14,000 deaths 
and 2,000,000 disabling injuries on the job nation- 
wide. Costs of occupational accidents totalled $7.3 
billions, with $1.5 billions in lost wages and an 
attendant loss of 245 million man-days of produc- 
tion. 

Certainly the passage of the pending Construc- 
tion Safety Bill, which has been introduced by 
Chairman Harrison Williams of the Senate Labor 
Subcommittee, will result in substantial savings in 
all departments — savings in more fathers and fewer 
orphans, more healthy workers and fewer cripples, 
more taxpayers and fewer recipients of relief. 

The blood of the 2,800 construction workers 
who have died during the past 1 2 months call out 
for its passage. No headlines scream it ... no 
television announcer declares it . . . but it is there. 

It remains to be seen if the nation can actually 
act without the "conditioning" of television, radio 
and the press! 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




The torturous history of the development of 
construction and industrial energy sources has 
climbed the long ladder from the first use of 
human and animal muscles to today's multi- 
purpose electrical systems powered by the atom. 

Paralleling the age-long striving for more efficient 
ways of doing things through improved tools 
and methods has been the dedication of the 
individual building craftsman, over the centuries, 
to maintained and improved quality work stand- 
ards for himself and his associated journeymen. 
Much of the world's material progress has been 
built on the parposefulness of mind of such 
and similar groups of men. 

Conscious of his heritage, the skilled craftsman 
of today feels the same spirit of commitment 
to exacting personal standards of work excellence 
as did his counterpart hundreds of years ago 
back in Europe. 




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JUNE, 1969 





Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 





A. 



1 







GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

second general vice president 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



general treasurer 
Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Henry W. Chandler 
1684 Stanton Rd., S. W., Atlanta, Ga. 
30311 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 

18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, Frederick N. Bull 

P.O. Box 14279 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 73114 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l. Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 

Forum Building. 9th and K Streets, 
Sacramento. California 95814 

Ninth District, William Stefanovttch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 



M. A. 
R. E. 



Hutcheson, Chairman 
Livingston, Secretary 




Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 



Secretaries, Please Hole 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



g/arjatprjuw 




VOLUME LXXXIX 



No. 6 



JUNE. 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



SIIABOI PRESS?,*, 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Building Trades Press for Legislative Action 2 

Slaughter on the Avenues 5 

A Neat Trick for CLIC 7 

Modern Shipwrights Have Varied Duties 8 

Unemployment Compensation 11 

A Time for Flag Waving 17 

More Unusual Hammers 23 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 10 

Canadian Report 14 

Local Union News 19 

We Congratulate 22 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred O. Goetz 24 

What's New in Apprenticeship 26 

Plane Gossip 31 

Service to the Brotherhood 32 

What's New? 36 

In Memoriam 37 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should be sent to 
THE CARPENTER. Carpenters' 8uilding, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W.. Washington. D. C. 20001 

Pud shea monthly at 810 Rhooe Islana Ave.. N.E., Washington. D. C. 20018. bv the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joine's of Ame'ica. Secono class pos'age pa : d at Washington, 
0. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada S2 per year, single copies 20; in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

A California millvvorker is dwarfed 
by redwood logs in a mill pond, as he 
struggles to move the mighty sections 
of timber into position for pickup. 

The picture was loaned to us by the 
Crocker-Citizens National Bank of San 
Francisco, which finances much of the 
lumbering operations on the West Coast. 

The picture indicates the tremen- 
dous size of the redwood and its great 
value as a source of building material. 
One of these giants can supply lumber 
for many houses. 

Though the redwood has tremen- 
dous size, it probably is not the 
world's all-time tallest or widest tree. 
Guiness Book of World Records in- 
dicates that the tallest tree of all time 
was probably a mountain ash found in 
Victoria. Australia, in 1872. It meas- 
ured 435 feet from its roots to the 
point where the trunk had been broken 
off by its fall. At this point the trunk's 
diameter was 3 feel, indicating that 
the tree's overall height when standing 
was more than 500 feet! Its diameter 
was 18 feet at 5 feet above the ground. 

Another specimen, known as "The 
Baron Tree." was reported to be 464 
feet in 1868. One of this species was 
felled at Thorpedale. Gippsland. Aus- 
tralia, in 1880 and another near Eure- 
ka, California, in 1914. with reported 
heights of 375 and 380 feet. 

Today's tallest is probably a 385- 
foot giant redwood, with a diameter 
of 16 feet. 10 inches, discovered in 
June, 1966. near Redwood Creek. 
Humboldt Countv. California. 





BUILDING TRADES PRESS 



FOR LEGISLATIVE ACTION 



Washington Conference Presents 16-Point Bill of Particulars 



■ The continuing problems posed to 
construction workers by the situs pick- 
eting ban and the lack of a comprehen- 
sive safety program for the industry 
were high on the agenda when more 
than 3,000 delegates to the AFL-CIO 
Building and Construction Trades De- 
partment held a Legislative Conference 
in Washington, D.C., last month. 

The Brotherhood was represented at 
the Conference by a delegation of 
more than 640 from all 50 states. 
Heading up our representation was 
General President M. A. Hutcheson 
and members of the General Execu- 
tive Board, which had scheduled a reg- 
ular meeting in Washington to coin- 
cide with the Legislative Conference. 

The Conference was under the di- 
rection of C. J. Haggerty, president, 
and Frank Bonadio, secretary-treasur- 



er, of the Building and Construction 
Trades Department. 

Delegates approved a slate of 16 
priority legislative goals (see accom- 
panying listing.) They urged that the 
91st Congress take positive action on 
the problem areas with which the 16 
topics are concerned. 

The delegations, by states, called on 
their home-state Senators and Repre- 
sentatives at their Capitol Hill offices. 
Following the visits, each delegation 
turned in a "report card" to the Build- 
ing and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment which listed the lawmakers' at- 
titudes on the various programs. These 
reports will serve as a guide to union 
legislative representatives in planning 
strategy and applying priorities de- 
signed to obtain passage of the pro- 
posals in this Congress. 



In their turns, members of Congress 
and representatives from the Nixon 
Cabinet appeared before the Confer- 
ence to speak to the assembled dele- 
gates. Most appeared to be keenly 
aware of the interests of organized 
labor. Leaders from both major parties 
voiced support for measures designed 
to legalize situs picketing, inauguration 
of an effective safety program and 
other vital subjects, including tax re- 
forms, Davis-Bacon proposals, restora- 
tion of Job Corps cutbacks, Urban De- 
velopment and Public Housing. 

A number of speakers before the 
Conference voiced support of the pro- 
posed Situs Picketing amendment. Said 
Secretary of Labor George P. Shultz: 
"We recognize that there is an inequity 
as to the conditions for picketing 
between industrial and construction 



THE CARPENTER 



sites. We want to eliminate that in- 
equity." 

House Majority Leader Carl Albert: 
"I was a member of the Committee on 
Education and Labor when we re- 
ported the situs picketing bill in the 
last Congress, and I supported it from 
beginning to end. ... I suggest to 
the membership that this, I think, is 
one of the most important pieces of 
legislation facing Congress. ... It will 
have the enthusiastic support of every 
member of leadership on my side of 
the aisle leading to its final passage." 

House Minority Leader Gerald 
Ford: "The Secretary of Labor is a 
knowledgeable, able, dedicated per- 
son, and I think he has laid the ground- 
work for action in the critical areas 
(of situs picketing) and I, for one, 
subscribe to its principles." 

Senate Minority Whip Hugh Scott: 
"I think the time is long past to treat 
this issue as one that is taking property 
away from anybody or depriving any- 
body of their rights, but rather an is- 
sue that will give you an opportunity 
to present the justice of your griev- 
ances, the fairness of your right to be 
heard, and your simple rights as Amer- 
ican citizens to receive a fair return 
for your effort, the energy and the 
labor which is expended." 

Congressman William Ayres of 
Ohio: "A year ago I pledged to you 
my support for the Common Situs 
Picketing Bill. I kept that pledge. Our 
Committee approved it, but once again 
it failed to progress beyond that point. 
Under the leadership and support of 
our new Secretary of Labor, I cannot 
but feel that it can make better strides 
toward enactment than has been the 
case hitherto." 

Congressman Frank Thompson of 
New Jersey: "I hope someday to come 
before you and say 'yesterday, or last 
week, or last month we did it: we 
passed the Common Situs Picketing 
Bill'." 

Summing up the feelings of most 
speakers on the subject of Situs Pick- 
eting was Department General Coun- 
sel Lou Sherman, who pointed out 
that. "There has been a realization by 
five Presidential administrations that 
there are inequities in the law. which 
must be cured by enactment of the leg- 
islators that this is not merely a labor- 
supported bill. This is a bill which has 
won the support of the four previous 
Presidents and now. at least in prin- 
ciple. Situs Picketing is being sup- 
ported by the Nixon Administration." 

Construction Safely 

Building Trades Conference speak- 
ers also appeared united on the subject 



of construction safety bills. Here's what 
Congressional leaders had to report: 

Congressman Carl Perkins of Ken- 
tucky: "Last week we were able to 
move, out of the full committee on 
Education and Labor, the construction 
safety bill which vitally affects the con- 
struction industry, because all of you 
realize there are so many industries in 
the country where we don't have con- 
struction safety. It is for that reason 
we thought it most important. And 
your organization, headed by Mr. 
Meany, Mr. Haggerty, and your legis- 
lative representative, Walter Mason, 
took the lead in this movement." 

Congressman Carl Albert said; "I 
am sure we can pass that bill without 
any difficulty at all. I don't think we 
have any problems with the safety 
measures, and it is just impossible for 
me to understand anybody who does 
not believe that the working man is 
entitled to safety." 

Senator Ralph Yarborough, Chair- 
man of the Senate Labor Committee, 
noted that the construction safety bill, 
"which would protect construction 
workers involved in Federal and Fed- 
erally-financed projects, is a step in the 
right direction. But much, much more 
needs to be done in protecting the 
American worker. A man needs pro- 
tection just as much on a privately 
financed project as on a federally 
financed job." 

Secretary of Labor Shultz com- 
mented on safety, "too: "I have been 
struck ... to see that, with all the 
attention given to strikes, the amount 
of man-days lost through on-the-job 
accidents in a typical year is on the 
order of seven or eight times as many 
man-days as those lost through strikes. 
I think that gives a little perspective on 
the importance of this issue of safety." 

Job Corps, Training 

Anticipated Nixon Administration 
cuts in the Job Corps program brought 
anticipated reaction from the Legisla- 
tive Conference speakers. 

Congressman Carl Perkins said: "It 
is a great mistake ... to cut back the 
Job Corps as is presently being pro- 
posed because we don't have any other 
training programs in existence in 
America to take the place of the Job 
Corps, to serve this hard-core young- 
ster with a below-fifth-grade education- 
al average; (hat will develop and train 
this hard core youngster to earn a 
livelihood." 

Senator Edward Kennedy. Senate 

Majority Whip, took note of the sub- 
ject to call attention to organized 



labor's involvement in training the dis- 
advantaged youth for gainful employ- 
ment; "You have candidly recognized 
the problem and conscientiously started 
to do something about it. One con- 
tribution you have made, for example, 
is organizing and running Job Corps 
conservation centers for our hard-core 
unemployed youth. Your work has 
been important, and the Job Corps has 
helped thousands. I am deeply con- 
cerned by the Administration's recent 
decision to shut down abruptly over 
half of the existing facilities. Of the 
59 centers being closed, over 26 have 
programs run by the building trades." 

Social Concern 

Senator Kennedy also spoke, as did 
others, of other urgent domestic needs 
as he pointed out the urgency in pro- 
viding for great numbers of low-cost 
housing units and educational facilities. 
"Over 500,000 classrooms are inade- 
quate." he said, and "current construc- 
tion is making no dent in this back- 
log. . . . With the $8 billion which the 
Administration wants to spend on 
ABM, (we) could provide 400.000 
units of low-cost housing. 400.000 
new classrooms. 1.300 new hospitals 
averaging 200 beds apiece . . . jobs 
for the members of the building trade 
while at the same time providing des- 
perately needed facilities." 

Secretary of Transportation John A. 
Volpe, who also addressed the Con- 
ference, put the subject of domestic 
priorities in another way: "If we can 
put a man on the moon, we can cer- 
tainly put a man on his feet." 

As Others See Us? 

Another member of President 
Nixon's cabinet. Secretary of Housing 
and Urban Development George Rom- 
ney, criticized the wage gains made 




General President M. A. Ilutchcson, 
right, confers with Ituildine and Con- 
struction Trades President C". J. HaRscrty. 



JUNE, 1969 



by the trades, holding them largely 
responsible for the high cost of 
housing. Although he noted that "I 
think we have to give housing a higher 
national priority," he suggested that it 
be done by "eliminating the barriers, 
local restrictions, codes, zones, and in- 
dustry practices that fragments this 
housing market and keep us from de- 
veloping markets based on volume." 

Romney pointed out specific wage 
increases which he felt were excessive- 
ly high, only to have them applauded 
by the conferees. Later, Director of 
the AFL-CIO's Legislative Depart- 
ment, Andrew Biemiller commented: 
"Whether he meant it or not, he paid 
a great tribute to the business agents, 
officers and members of the local un- 
ions of the Building Trades Unions of 
America by reciting that list of wage 
increases. I was very impressed by it. 
Keep up the good work!" 

Biemiller also summed up the tone 
of the Congress and the difficult work 
ahead in gaining constructive legisla- 
tion from it. "We have a very strange 
Congress on our hands. Nobody has 
seen anything like it for almost 200 
years. ... So far, nobody can give 
this Congress very high marks for 
what has happened because of this 



Building Trades Sixteen-Point Legislative Program 



1 — Taft-Hartley Amendments 

a. On-Site Picketing 

b. Repeal of Section 14(b) 

c. Joint Labor-Management 
Trade Promotion Funds 

d. Joint Labor-Management 
Funds for Joint Committee or 
Board to Interpret Collective 
Bargaining Agreements 

e. Joint Labor-Management 
Funds form Education and 
Child Care Centers 

2 — Safety and Health 

a. Construction Safety 

b. Occupational Health and 
Safety 

c. Asbestos Workers' Safety 

3 — Davis-Bacon 

a. Application of Act to Lease 
and Leasing Arrangements 
entered into by the Post Office 
Department and other Gov- 
ernment Agencies 

b. Amend the Act to Include 
Subsistence Allowances 



c. Extension of Act of Demoli- 
tion of Public Buildings 
4 — Education 

5 — Minimum Wage Increase 
6 — Social Security Amendments 
7 — Workmen's Compensation — 
Federal Standards to Ensure 
Uniform State Benefits 
8 — Unemployment Compensation 

Amendments 
9 — Tax Reform 
10 — Equal Employment Oppor- 
tunity 

1 1 — Welfare and Pension Plans 

12 — Housing and Urban Develop- 
ment 

13 — Maritime 

14 — Consumer Protection 

15 — Longshoremen and Harbor 
Workers Compensation Act 
Amendments 

16 — Federal Highway Act Amend- 
ments 



impasse (caused by difference in party 
control of the Administration and Con- 
gress). . . . Because of this constant 
clashing between the Administration 



and the Congress, things are moving 
slowly. ... I can assure you one hell 
of a fight will be made. That fight has 
now started and will be kept up." 



AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer : 



Lane Kirkland Elected 
To Succeed Wm. Schnitzler 



The AFL-CIO Executive Council 
elected Lane Kirkland secretary-treas- 
urer of the federation as of July 1, 
1969, to fill out the term of William 
F. Schnitzler who will retire at the 
end of June. 

The council accepted "with deepest 
regret" Schnitzler's decision to retire 
and said it looked forward to "his con- 
tinuing advice and counsel as secre- 
tary-treasurer emeritus." 

AFL-CIO Pres. George Meany, in 
announcing the election of Kirkland 
to a press conference, said there were 
no other nominees for the post. Kirk- 
land has served as executive assistant 
to the president of the AFL-CIO since 
1960. 

The council resolution on Schnitzler 
hailed him as "friend and colleague, 
trade union leader and distinguished 
American," and reviewed his long serv- 
ice to the AFL-CIO and the trade 
union movement. Schnitzler has been 
AFL-CIO secretary-treasurer since the 
founding of the organization in Decem- 
ber 1955. 



The retiring secretary-treasurer 
spoke briefly at the press conference 
saying he was looking forward to re- 
tirement at 65, a decision that was en- 
tirely his own, and of his pride in years 
of serving with Meany as one of the 
executive officers of the federation. 

Kirkland, 47, a native of Camden, 
S.C., and a member of the Masters, 
Mates & Pilots, served as a maritime 
officer after graduation from the U.S. 
Merchant Marine Academy in 1942. 
He joined the AFL research staff in 
1948 after completing his B.S. degree 
work at Georgetown University. 

From 1953 to 1958 he served as as- 
sistant director of the AFL and AFL- 
CIO Dept. of Social Security. In 1958 
he became director of research and 
education of the Operating Engineers, 
returning to the AFL-CIO in 1960 to 
become executive assistant to Meany. 

He is president of the Institute of 
Collective Bargaining & Group Rela- 
tions, a director of the American 
Foundation on Automation & Employ- 
ment, a board member of Community 




Congratulations from AFL-CIO Sec- 
retary Treasurer William F. Schnitzler 
and Pres. George Meany are extended 
to Lane Kirkland, right, who was elected 
by the Executive Council to fill out the 
term of Schnitzler who is retiring as of 
June 30, 1969. 

Health, Inc., and a member of the U.S. 
Merchant Marine Academy Advisory 
Board. He serves also as a fellow of 
the American Public Health Associa- 
tion and of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science. 

Earlier he had served as a member 
of the Federal Hospital Council ad- 
viser to world maritime conferences, 
on the Missile Sites Labor Commission 
and the President's Maritime Advisory 
Committee. 



THE CARPENTER 





"SLAUGHTER 
ON OUR 
AVENUES!" 




U.S. Traffic Deaths for Nearly 

Double of Viet Casualties! 



■ A COMPILATION of grim 
traffic accident statistics has been 
released by the Travelers Insurance 
Company. The study reveals that 
"1968 was an ugly year for Ameri- 
cans." 

"Tragedy of a spectacular magni- 
tude became a frequent front-page 
occurrence. But a quieter national 
calamity took its dreadful toll on 
all the days before, during and after 
Tet, the riots, the assassinations," 
said the introduction to the book 
of statistics. 

"It was 'quiet' only because it was 
not concentrated in a single place 
at a single time. There was no focus 
to put this misery on the front page. 
To the families and friends of 55,- 
300 men, women and children killed 
in motor vehicle accidents, however, 
it was the ultimate calamity. To the 
4,400,000 victims of injury, it was 
hard-core agony. The economic 
waste, about $13.5 billion, was an 
appalling waste." 

American vs. American 

In the 365 days of 1968, more 
Americans were killed by other 
Americans using motor vehicles as 
weapons than have been killed by 
the Viet Cong and North Viet- 
namese in Viet Nam since 1960. 
In fact, according to official Depart- 
ment of Defense figures, there were 
29,184 Americans killed in Viet 
Nam between Jan. 1, 1961, and 



Nov. 2, 1968. The traffic casualties 
on U.S. roads and highways totalled 
26,116 more than that in only 12 
months! 

Many American youths are in- 
censed beyond measure at the deaths 
in Viet Nam. But the continued 
slaughter, of themselves and others 
by youths on U.S. public roads, 
leaves them singularly unimpressed! 

Private automobiles, as usual, 
were the prime" offenders. There 
were 23,000 people killed and 3,- 
182,000 injured in such crashes. 
The deaths of 18,700 and injuries 
to 8 1 1 ,000 were ascribed to "speeds 
too fast for conditions." Other prime 
driver failures cited were: "driving 
on the wrong side of the road," "did 
not have the right-of-way," and the 
grab-bag "reckless driving." 

Pedestrians were at fault, too, and 
9,600 paid with their lives for care- 
less walking. Of that total, 3,900 
were killed while crossing the street 
between intersections. There were 
1.350 killed while walking on rural 
highways (presumably not facing on- 
coming traffic). 

The young and over-confident 
driver continues to account for a 
predominate number of auto-caused 
deaths. The under-25 age group 
constitutes only one-fifth of all 
licensed drivers. Yet this one-fifth 
of the drivers were involved in one- 
third of all fatal traffic accidents. 
They killed 19,200 of the 64,500 



people who died in auto crashes 
during the year 1968. 

The statistical experts of Travel- 
ers refuse to take sides in the man- 
vs-woman driver feud. They duly 
report that 85.3 percent of those 
involved in fatal accidents were 
males (14.7 female) but then point 
out that there are many more men 
drivers who travel many more miles 
than female drivers. 

"There are many proven reasons 
why cars crash." the statisticians 
report. "Sex of the driver is not 
one of them," they diplomatically 
add. 

Taxis, Busses Safest 

A breakdown on types of vehicles 
in fatal accidents reveals that taxis 
(200) and busses (650) are the 
safest conveyances on the roads. 
There were 55,200 passenger cars 
and 11.100 commercial vehicles 
(presumably trucks) involved. The 
most-dangerous vehicle percentage- 
wise is the motorcycle, with 2.250 
involved, despite the relative small 
numbers of them licensed compared 
to private autos. 

The statistics, compiled by Trav- 
elers from monthly reports from 
state motor vehicle departments, de- 
clares that "energetic and thorough 
research has nailed down drunk 
driving as a major accident cause." 
All law enforcement officers know- 
that the drinking driver, together 



JUNE. 1969 



with the drunken driver, cause far 
and away the vast majority of all 
accidents. Travelers points out that 
the careful reader will note the clear 
inferences contained in the tables 
which specify "speed too fast for 
conditions" (loss of judgment), "on 
wrong side of road," "drove off 
roadway," "did not have right-of- 
way," or "reckless driving," (all 
products of loss of coordination, or 
loss of judgment, or both). 

Also, the majority of accidents 
occur on Saturdays and 16.1 per- 
cent of all fatal accidents occur be- 
tween 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., when the 
vast majority of (sober) people are 
in bed. 

A study by the Department of 
Transportation reported to Con- 
gress: "The use of alcohol by driv- 
ers and pedestrians leads to some 
25,000 deaths and a total of at 
least 800,000 crashes in the United 
States each year." 

The insurance company titled its 
statistical review of accident-caused 
deaths and injuries "Alcoholocaust." 
It is the 35th year the survey has 
been published. 

The study points out that it is 
inviting death to drive while drunk 
and it is flirting with disaster to have 
"a couple of cocktails" or "a few 
beers." 

To continue to live, the obvious 
message of the booklet is that to- 
day's drivers would be well-advised 
to refrain from ALL alcoholic bev- 
erages, keep speed to a reasonable 
level consistent with driving condi- 
tions, and "watch out for the other 
guy" (drive defensively). 



TOOL TALK 





"If you wanta come-along, we'll do 
the driving." 

— Michael Rende, Local 323. Beacon, N.Y. 



The Traffic Death Sum-Up of 1968 

• 55,300 deaths ... a 5% increase over 1967 

• 4,400,000 injuries . . . 200,000 more than 1967 

• Accidents involving speed resulted in more than 800,000 casualties 
in 1968 

• One third of the drivers involved in fatal accidents were under 25 
years of age 

• 40% of the deaths and 33% of the injuries occurred on Saturday 
and Sunday 

• 4 out of 5 deaths occurred on dry roads in clear weather 

• More than 55% of the deaths occurred during the hours of darkness 



Job Safety Legislation 
Pressed As Injuries Mount 



Esther Peterson, former assistant 
secretary of labor, urged passage of 
the Occupational Health & Safety 
bill to curb the mounting toll of job- 
related deaths and injuries. On-the- 
job accidents claimed the lives of 
more than 14,500 Americans last 
year. 

Mrs. Peterson, now legislative rep- 
resentative for the Clothing Workers, 
said the bill would provide badly- 
needed uniform health and safety 
safeguards for the "life and limb of 
workers in every state," and enforce- 
ments procedures to make them 
effective. 

Mrs. Peterson, who served both 
Presidents Kennedy and Johnson as 
an assistant secretary of labor, 
charged that the United States now 
lags behind most other industralized 
nations in occupational health and 
safety. 

"Rather than say we are the best, 
we should hang our heads in shame, 
that in a country so developed, we 
are so bad," she declared. 

"We are not improving," she 
added, "the situation is getting 
worse." She appeared on the na- 
tionwide interview, Labor News 
Conference, broadcast Tuesdays at 
7:35 p.m., EST, on the Mutual 
radio network. 



Mrs. Peterson said that stiff op- 
position by the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce, the National Association 
of Manufacturers, and insurance 
companies killed a similar measure 
in the last Congress. She warned 
that another such campaign is under 
way this year. 

She rejected allegations that costs 
of the program would be high. "I 
am convinced that if the money is 
invested, we will save it in insurance, 
we will save it in compensation — 
not to mention what we save in 
terms of human values," she said. 

Mrs. Peterson said the measure 
would be particularly helpful to 
comparatively small businesses and 
industries, few of which can afford 
good health and safety programs 
of their own. 

"I find that these people are really 
concerned," she said. "They don't 
want to compete on the blood of 
workers or the lungs of workers," 
she declared. They want and need 
the kind of technical assistance and 
service that the Occupational Health 
and Safety Act would make possible, 
she said. 

Reporters questioning Mrs. Peter- 
son were Victor Cohn of the Wash- 
ington Post and Harry Conn of Press 
Associates, Inc. 



THE CARPENTER 




Participants in the CLIC ceremony were, from left: Walter Johnson, Local 1694; Wilton Tyler, Local 132; Robert Quinn, 
Local 1831; Donald Watson, Local 1831; Sherman Shell, Local 528; Terrence Shives, Local 1590; Charles Goodacre, Local 
1590; .lames Parks, Local 132; Robert Nichols, Local 1665; Harlan Whiting, Local 132; John Marshall, Local 1694; William 
Laforest, Local 1145; James Bailey, legislative representative for the Brotherhood; Dale Menestrina, Local 1590; General 
Treasurer Peter Terzick; and Nicholas R. Loope, JAC coordinator. Not present for the picture were: Tony Mossburg, Local 
1590, president of the student council; Ralph Hanback, Local 1665; Franklin Moody, Local 132; Wayne Ancell, Local 1590; 
Wilmer Hart, Local 1665; Douglas Dillon, Local 1590; John Miller, Local 132; Michael Hiner, Local 132; William Carroll, Local 
132; Robert Wehland, Local 1590; Cornell Evans, Local 1694; William Fleming, Local 1590; Michael Chismar, Local 1590; 
and Robert Brown, Local 1590. 

A Neat Trick for CLIC 



■ The standard rule is for jour- 
neymen to set the example and to 
teach the apprentices what is im- 
portant and what is not important. 
In one instance, at least, the tables 
recently were turned, and the ap- 
prentices set an example for the 
journeymen they work with. 

The entire student council, which 
oversees student activities in the 
apprenticeship program of the Wash- 



ington, D.C. and Vicinity District 
Council, recently participated 100 
percent in the CLIC (Carpenters 
Legislative Improvement Commit- 
tee) program by the purchase of $10 
gold CLIC buttons. 

Each one of the 27 council mem- 
bers purchased a gold CLIC button. 
Perhaps this action was inspired by 
the proximity of the apprentice boys 
to the seat of the national govern- 
ment. This may have given them a 



better understanding of the impor- 
tance which good or bad legislation 
can have on the lives of working 
people. 

At any rate. THE CARPENTER 
extends congratulations to the mem- 
bers of the student council and to 
Nicholas Loope, co-ordinator of the 
joint apprenticeship committee for 
the Washington, D.C. and Vicinity 
District Council. ■ 



Economy Still Hot; Statistics Show Cooling Off Period Ahead 



WASHINGTON. (PAI)— The Ameri- 
can economy during the first part of 
1 9fS9 has been making records, hut there 
are signs that it is slowing down some- 
what. 

Before-tax profits of corporations rose 
during the first quarter of the year to a 
seasonally adjusted annual rate of $96 
billion — a record in itself — but only about 
$250,000,000 above the final quarter of 
1968. The 1969 figures represented the 
smallest quarterly increase in two years. 

Financial institutions, as could be ex- 



pected because of high interest rates, 
registered good gains, but manufactur- 
ing was down slightly because of lower 
earnings in the automobile industry. 

After-tax earnings reached $53 billion 
for corporations as a whole, compared 
with $44.1 billion during the first quarter 
of 1968. Dividend payments were running 
at an annual rate of $25.4 billion during 
the first quarter of this year as compiled 
with $23.6 billion during the lirsi quarter 
a year ago. 

Personal income increased during April 
by $2.75 billion to a seasonally adjusted 



annual rate of $730.5 billion, a new 
high, but only about half of the average 
boost of $5 billion during the past few- 
months. 

The slower April expansion was cen- 
tered in pri\aic wage and salarj disburse- 
ments. Service payrolls registered the 
smallest gain since last October while 
government wages and salaries — mostly 
on the State and Local levels — advanced 
bj $500,000,000. 

Personal income for the Frsl lour 
months of the year was $54 billion, or 
9 percent better than a year ago. 



JUNE, 1969 




MODERN SHIPWRIGHTS HAVE VARIED DUTIES, 
PRIDE IN WORKMANSHIP 



WORK IN A SHIPYARD APPEALS TO A CERTAIN TYPE OF CARPENTER 



■ According to the dictionary, a 
shipwright is "a man whose work 
is the construction and repair of 
ships" — and that is putting a big 
story in a small nutshell! 

Years ago, when all ships were 
built of wood and much smaller 
than today's vessels, the story was 
simpler than it is today. (See 
"Craftsmen for Mighty Ships," 
March, 1969, CARPENTER.) 

Now, shipwrights share their for- 
mer work with the men who work 
with metal, but they have retained 
their responsibility for "shaping the 
ship" and still use many of their 
oldtime crafts. 

Typical of many of today's ship- 
wrights are the Brotherhood mem- 
bers who belong to Local 1 1 84, 
employed by the Lockheed Ship- 



building and Construction Co. in 
Seattle, Washington. 

At LSCC, the members follow 
blueprints and ships' plans, sight, 
plot and mark reference points and 
lines on docks and ways to maintain 
proper alignment of vessels during 
construction or repair. Transits, 
plumb bobs, tapes and levels are 
used for this. They build keel and 
bilge blocks, cradles and shoring 
for supporting ships in drydock or 
on ways. LSCC shipwrights also 
position and secure blocking and 
other structures on dock platform, 
according to ship's blueprints, and 
align the vessel over blocks. 

They establish reference points 
and lines on the ship's hull for locat- 
ing machinery and other equipment 
in accordance with ship's alignment 
and shape. 



As required, they shape, finish and 
install wooden spars, masts, cargo 
booms and boat booms. Local 1 1 84 
members also may fabricate and 
install furring pieces, aprons, up- 
rights and other wood framing in 
the ship and trim wooden frames 
and other timbers. They spike or 
bolt metal fittings, plates and bulk- 
heads to the wooden parts of the 
ship. Building staging needed for 
work on ships is also their responsi- 
bility. 

The work outlined above covers 
the principal areas of shipwrights' 
work, but there are a few bits miss- 
ing (with no pun intended!) 

Installation of insulation in ships, 
for instance, has become a big job 
in today's metal vessels, and this is 
a shipwright's task. 

Describing the duties men per- 



8 



THE CARPENTER 



form in shipbuilding may be infor- 
mative — but it leaves out the "how" 
of the work, and the attitude the 
workmen have toward their jobs. 

At LSCC the shipwrights are a 
proud bunch, proud of their tradi- 
tions and of their skills. As fore- 
man Harlan Tallackson put it: 

"When a man asks me how a job 
he has just finished looks, I know 
he has a pride that goes beyond just 
wanting to do a good job — he's 
proud of the work he has done." 

Shipwrights have a four-year ap- 
prenticeship. Their training includes 
all the areas covered by all carpenter 
apprentices, but they must also learn 
to work with curved and shaped 
surfaces instead of the usual straight 
and square shapes. 

Work in a shipyard appeals to a 
certain type of carpenter. A man 
who would be happy doing nothing 
but shop work would probably not 
find shipbuilding to his liking. Here 
men work in the shop and out on 
the ways — under ships and often 
high in the air above the ways. 

The attractions of the work, ac- 
cording to several LSCC ship- 
wrights, include variety, and the 
satisfaction of creating a ship. 

"Each ship is different somehow 
— even those built from the same 
plans. Our work is never monoto- 
nous — a man continues to learn 
every day, no matter how many 
years he has worked in a shipyard." 

Ed Callaham, foreman who works 
with insulation projects, points out 
that shipwrights work with a great 
variety of materials, including wood, 
plastic, formica, fiber glass and cork. 

Shipwrights' tools, along with 
modern power tools, still include 
the time-honored broad axe, adze 
and caulking equipment. The ship- 
wright's trade is a mixture of ancient 
and modern tools, techniques and 
materials. But the shipwright gen- 
erally has a good, old-fashioned 
pride in his workmanship. ■ 

We arc indebted to Clarence E. 
Brings. General Representative, for 

assistance in obtaining the pictures 
and material on the operations at 
Lockheed Shipbuilding and Con- 
struction Co.: to H. B. Jackson, 
LSCC Industrial Relations, for his 
assistance, and to Mrs. Pat Seeger 
for portions of the manuscript and 
Joe Williamson for the pictures. 



Below: Harlan Tallackson uses 
transit to align keel blocks. Below, 
right: Manuel Yillalobos drives 
home caulking. Local 1184 represents 
shipwrights at LSCC. 





Left, center: Clarence Busch and Tom 
Rulkowski appl) insulation. At left: Red 
Carter constructs new lifeboat rudder. Right, 
center: \ em Beck makes new sliafl hearing. 
Above: Con Mullins and S\d Gregorj use 
electric drill in applying a new keel. 



JUNE, 1969 




WASHINGTON roundup 



WITHHOLDING TAXES WITHHELD-During 1968 U.S. employers withheld $339,428,000 from 
the paychecks of their workers that they did. not return to the U.S. Treasury "by 
law. This was reported to the Senate by Senator John Williams of Delaware in 
making what he called his "15th annual report on the inventory of delinquent tax- 
payer accounts." Illegally-kept withholding taxes in 1968 represented an increase 
of 32% over 1967. 

PAPER BOATS?— You ' ve heard the expression, "Enough paper to sink a "battleship." 
Well, Bath Industries, a ship construction firm, wasn't fooling. It says that 
some 27,000 pounds of paper went into its proposal recently submitted to the Navy 
in competition for a new destroyer program. 

URGES U.N. SUPPORT— Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Arthur Goldberg, 
called on labor to maintain a "deep-rooted interest" in the U.N. as the best 
means for securing peace. Goldberg addressed 50 unionists at a luncheon spon- 
sored by the United Nations Assn. 

PICKETS WE SUPPORT— "The youngest pickets in history" was the way the Washington 
Post described a picketline of protestors — aged 6 to 12 — outside their neigh- 
borhood theater in Washington. They were complaining about too many "sexy" and 
"adult only" films and not enough kiddies' movies. 

EYE OF A POLITICAL NEEDLE— It became clearer than ever that there's little or no 
chance of the "common man" or a worker being elected to high public office these 
days unless he has union financial backing. The fact is that these days you 
practically have to be a millionaire to be elected to the U.S. Senate. These con- 
clusions were encountered in findings by the Citizens Research Foundation. Pre- 
liminary studies show that the Republicans and Democrats spent a total of $42,- 
200,000 on last year's presidential campaign; the Republicans laying out $29,- 
600,000 contrasted with $12,600,000 by the Democrats. But much more revealing 
for the "poor" candidate was this disclosure: Last year the major parties had 
to spend 74^f per vote for every vote cast in their favor-compared with 52^ per 
vote in the 1964 presidential election. 

WOMAN POWER— Two women from American labor have been named to a special Dem- 
ocratic Party committee to enlist more qualified women to run for public office. 
Mrs. Esther Peterson, former Assistant Secretary of Labor and now legislative 
representative for the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, and Mrs. Esther Murray, 
former Eastern Area Director of COPE's Women's Activities Division, will serve. 

DECLINE IN IDLENESS— The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports a substantial decline 
in strike idleness for the first quarter of 1969 over the same period last year. 
There were 1,230 labor disputes for the first three months of 1969, involving 
504,000 workers. Last year, 573,000 workers lost time because of work stoppages 
in the first quarter of 1968. 

NEW DIRECTOR of the Labor Department's Bureau of Employees' Compensation is John 
M. Ekeberg, a career employee, with the department for over 25 years. 

The bureau is responsible for administering statutory Federal programs pro- 
viding workmen's compensation protection for approximately 4 million workers in 
public and certain private employment within Federal jurisdiction, including long- 
shore and harbor workers. 

Ekeberg, 55, has been deputy administrator of the Department's Bureau of 
Work-Training Programs (formerly the Bureau of Work Programs) since November 1967. 

Before assuming that position, he had served since March 1965 as regional 
director of the Bureau of Work Programs in Kansas City, Missouri. 

10 THE CARPENTER 




UNEMPLOYEMENT 
COMPENSATION 

. . . will the Nixon 
Administration update 
and modernize it? 



■ Organized labor has reason to 
believe that the Nixon Administra- 
tion will shortly initiate acceptable 
action in this session of Congress 
toward the much-needed goal of up- 
dating and modernizing the nation's 
outmoded system of unemployment 
compensation. 

Labor has been informed that the 
Administration is in the process of 
preparing legislation to update the 
system of providing benefits during 
temporary joblessness. Reportedly, 
the Administration's measure, as yet 
formally unannounced, is not un- 
acceptable to the AFL-CIO. The 
labor federation is waiting to see if 
the Administration will move mean- 
ingful legislation through the 91st 
Congress. As soon as it is released 
for committee hearings, testimony 
relative to it may be given by ex- 
perts in the field from the ranks of 
organized labor. 

Mills Statement 

Rep. Wilbur D. Mills, Chairman 
of the powerful House Ways and 
Means Committee, has said that his 
committee is facing, in addition to 
proposed tax reforms, "important 
issues of foreign trade and unem- 
ployment compensation." 

Rep. Mills has not been quoted 
on what the proposed measure on 
unemployment compensation will in- 
volve. But to be acceptable to or- 
ganized labor it would have to up- 



date, modernize and improve the 
system which was first established 
in 1935 and remains, today, one of 
the major income maintenance pro- 
grams of the nation. 

Some Hindsight 

Four years ago, organized labor 
urged Congress to pass legislation 
which would establish minimum fed- 
eral standards to be observed by par- 
ticipating states. Opponents of the 
reform legislation maintained that 
the states could be relied upon to 
modernize the system. But it didn't 
work quite that way. 

The opponents of the program 
failed to consider the problem gen- 
erated by interstate competition. Re- 
cent state improvements consist of 
a few insignificant extensions of cov- 
erage, minor changes in the taxable 
wage base, and continuing deteri- 
oration of the benefit structure. 

Knowledgeable persons in the 
ranks of organized labor have been 
largely convinced that the states are 
cither unwilling or unable to mod- 
ernize the system. The record of the 
states' inaction on unemployment 
compensation is dismal. There is an 
urgent need for establishment of 
federal minimum standards on cov- 
erage, eligibility, benefit level and 
duration, increasing the taxable wage 
base and tax rate, providing federal 
grants to the states to help meet ex- 
cess benefits costs, fixing limits on 



disqualifications and providing a new 
federal program for the long-term 
unemployed. 

The seriousness of the situation 
is reflected in the fact that the na- 
tion's first line of defense against 
want and poverty has deteriorated to 
a level where it perpetuates poverty 
and its evils. The jobless worker, 
the grocer, the merchant and the en- 
tire economy are actual and poten- 
tial victims of the shocking erosion 
of the unemployment insurance sys- 
tem. 

One paragraph in the 1968 Man- 
power Report of the President re- 
flects how inadequate the unemploy- 
ment insurance system has become 
in the past 30 years: 

Manpower Comment 

"Despite improvements in unem- 
ployment insurance and workmen's 
compensation programs . . . today, 
a worker and his family, dependent 
solely on either program, would in 
a majority of cases drop below a 
poverty subsistence level even if he 
received the maximum payment al- 
lowable under state laws." 

Other important and beneficial 
aspects of employment security — 
manpower development and train- 
ing programs — have received the 
bulk of attention in recent years. 
These programs were not designed 
to meet the problems of short-term 
(Continued on Payc 12) 



JUNE, 1969 



11 



JOBLESS BENEFITS BELOW POVERTY LEVEL 

Maximum Weekly Benefits as a percent of Poverty Level 
Income for a Four Member Family* 



CONN. 

MICH. 
ALASKA 

MASS. 
HAWAII 

CALIF. 

n. y. 

wise. 

R. I. 

N. J. 

OHIO 
PENN. 

D. C. 
ILL. 

NEV. 
COLO. 

MD. 
IOWA 

DEL. 

N. H. 
IDAHO 

MO. 
UTAH 

KAN. 

WYO. 

ARIZ. 

LA. 

MINN. 

VT. 

IND. 
MAINE 

N. D. 

ORE. 

KY. 

VA. 

WEST VA. 

S. C. 
GA. 

TEX. 

ALA. 

ARK. 

NEB. 

N. C. 
TENN. 
WASH. 

S. D. 

FLA. 

MISS. 

N. MEX. 

OKLA. 

MONT. 

P. R. 



50 



100 



150 





* Includes dependent allowances where payable. 
•* 7966 U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare Poverty 
Index for a tour member family is $3,335 per year; on a weekly 
basis this equals $64.14. 

Source: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Social 
Security Administration: "Social Security Bulletin," March 7968. 



(Continued from Page 11) 

unemployment. But many legisla- 
tors, tended to view these programs 
as panaceas for all unemployment 
ills. As a result, the need to improve 
the unemployment compensation 
program has been neglected. 

Today, as the nation nears eight 
years of unparalleled prosperity, the 
longest sustained period of uninter- 
rupted economic growth in the na- 
tion's history, production, profits, 
income and employment have moved 
to ever-higher levels. But at the 
same time there has been the per- 
sistent problem of excessive unem- 
ployment for millions of people. 
More than 1 1 million American 
workers were victims of unemploy- 
ment at some time during the pros- 
perous year of 1966. 

Other Legislation 

Year after year, Congress has 
enacted legislation intended to 
strengthen the economy and pro- 
mote growth. An indication of this 
legislative concern with the health 
of the economy is reflected in mini- 
mum wage improvements, the es- 
tablishment of area and regional 
economic development programs, 
anti-poverty programs and a multi- 
plicity of manpower development 
and training programs. 

Despite this demonstrated con- 
cern for the nation's continued pros- 
perity. Congress has failed to take 
the essential action required to pro- 
tect the economy from the ravages 
of a serious recession. The unem- 
ployment compensation system has 
been allowed to deteriorate. In fact, 
half-hearted state action and federal 
inaction have made the system al- 
most meaningless for more than half 
the jobless workers. 

The original intent of the system 
was to assist unemployed workers 
involuntarily separated from their 
jobs. But the record shows the sys- 
tem has been moving away from this 
goal. 

Ten years ago, more than one- 
half of the unemployed drew some 
benefit from the system. By 1965, 
only four out of ten jobless workers 
drew benefits. In the last few years, 
only about three of ten unemployed 
workers received benefits, according 
to the AFL-CIO. 

This is a problem which cannot 
be ignored. Throughout the entire 



12 



THE CARPENTER 



Proposed Standards 



1. Coverage. Extension of cover- 
age to all wage and salaried work- 
ers. 

2. Wage Qualifying Require- 
ments. Requirements should not 
exceed 20 weeks of work or its 
equivalent. 

3. Benefits. 

a. The state benefit formula 
should provide for flexible maxi- 
mum weekly payments so benefits 
will automatically keep pace with 
wages. 

The individual's weekly benefits 
should be equal to 66% percent of 
the workers' past fulltime earnings 
(or at least l/20th of high quarter 
wages) and in no case less than 50 
percent. 

b. The state maximum weekly 
benefit amount should equal at least 
66% percent of the state's average 
weekly wage in covered employ- 
ment. 



c. If the statewide maximum 
benefit amount cannot be raised 
to this level immediately, it should 
progressively approach this level. 

4. Duration. Every claimant 
should be entitled to at least 26 
weeks under state law. 

5. Eligibility and Disqualifica- 
tions. 

a. The "waiting week" should 
be eliminated or at least compen- 
sated retroactively after a few 
weeks of unemployment. 

b. The "availability require- 
ment" should be limited to regis- 
tration and availability for suitable 
work, which term should be prop- 
erly described and it should specif- 
ically permit a worker to refuse 
uncovered employment. 

c. Disqualification of a person 
able and available for suitable 
work should be only for the most 
serious reasons and only for a 



limited period — not in excess of 
six weeks. There should be no re- 
duction or cancellation of a work- 
er's benefit rights or base period 
wages in any case, and there 
should be no denial of benefits for 
a person participating in training 
courses with the approval of the 
state agency. 

6. Financing. To secure the 
soundness of the funds, the follow- 
ing measures should be taken: 

a. Experience rating should be 
eliminated or modified by reducing 
the range between maximum and 
minimum tax rates. In any event 
zero rates should be eliminated. 

b. The taxable wage base 
should be raised to at least the 
same base in use in Old-Age and 
Survivors Insurance ($7,800 effec- 
tive lanuary 1968). This could be 
accomplished in a series of steps 
over a period of years. 



system, federal and state laws have 
gradually been amended to extend 
coverage to more and more workers. 
The major extensions have resulted 
from federal legislation, but at the 
state level some progress also has 
been made. Coverage in 34 jurisdic- 
tions exceeds present federal stand- 
ards; yet the proportion of jobless 
workers receiving benefits is steadily 
declining. This alarming trend is 
particularly disturbing and needs 
study and legislative correction. 

It may be difficult to identify all 
the reasons for this failure of the 
system to do what it ought to do, 
but some major reasons are appar- 
ent. Many unemployed workers 
find new job without filing a claim 



for benefits. Some unemployed in- 
dividuals had previous work in jobs 
excluded from coverage under the 
federal laws and various state laws. 
Some jobless workers are disqualified 
at the time they try to establish a 
claim, and others fail to establish 
eligibility under the various laws 
because of earnings or length of em- 
ployment requirements. 

Population Factor 

An indication of the need for 
greater federal participation is clear- 
ly reflected in the area of unemploy- 
ment insurance coverage. The popu- 
lation, the labor force and the na- 
tion's economy have outgrown the 
system which had been designed 30 



years ago to meet the needs of a 
great economic depression. 

Despite the willingness of Con- 
gress and some state legislatures to 
broaden coverage, approximately 
one-fourth of the jobs held by wage 
and salary workers are still excluded. 
In 1967, over 16 million workers 
were employed in jobs outside the 
system and the number increases an- 
nually with the expansion of em- 
ployment in uncovered industries. 

Workers in most of these indus- 
tries represent a substantial and 
growing element in the nation's 
workforce and they need the pro- 
tection of unemployment insurance 
as much as workers in the covered 
industries. ■ 



ONE OUT OF 

EVERY FOUR 

WAGE AND 

SALARY WORKERS 

IS NOT COVERED BY 

UNEMPLOYMENT 

INSURANCE.* 

* 7966 estimates. 
" Excludes clergymen and 
members ot religious 
orders, student nurses, 
interns, and students em- 
ployed in schools where 
enrolled. 
Source: U.S. Department ot 
Labor. 




7.8 million State and local government 



2.5 million Domestic service 

2.3 million Nonprofit 

1.6 million Farm and agricultural processing 
1.8 million Small firms 
0.3 million Other 

.7 million Railroad Unemployment Insurance 

2.8 million Federal workers 
3.1 million Armed Forces 



JUNE, 1969 



13 




NADIAIM 
REPORT 



Housing Policies 
At Cabinet Level 

The trade union movement has 
long been urging the Federal gov- 
ernment to name a cabinet minister 
to take charge of housing. Early in 
May Prime Minister Trudeau came 
close to doing this by naming a 
Northern Ontario businessman Rob- 
ert Andras as minister without port- 
folio and assigning housing to him. 

The change came about as a 
result of the sudden resignation of 
Paul Hellyer, a former Toronto 
builder, as Minister of Transport. 
He was also responsible for hous- 
ing as a sideline. 

On resigning, Mr. Hellyer charged 
that the prime minister was not 
giving enough priority to urban 
problems, and was dragging his feet 
about implementing the proposals of 
the Hellyer Task Force on Housing 
which reported early this year. 

On analysis Mr. Hellyer's posi- 
tion on resigning was not a strong 
one. His housing report was con- 
demned on a number of counts by 
almost every responsible authority 
in Canada. His blunderbus attack 
on public housing is a case in point. 
One editorial comment was that Mr. 
Hellyer's reasoning "even on the 
narrowest aspects of housing policy, 
was so defective that it commanded 
neither the respect of the experts nor 
the understanding of the laymen." 

Unfortunately, once Mr. Hellyer 
got himself out of the way, the prime 
minister introduced most of housing 
policies for which the former hous- 
ing minister was criticized. 

The new policy does make more 
mortgage money available. But at 
what a cost? 

Purchasers of new homes can 
now get a loan under the National 
Housing Act to cover 95 percent 
of the first $18,000 of the cost of 



14 



the house, and then 70 percent of 
the balance up to a maximum of 
$25,000. 

This change will reduce down 
payments from a minimum of $5,- 
900 to $3,300 on a $25,000 home. 

But what will this mean in terms 
of the total payment of a home? 

At 9 percent mortgage interest 
(the present NHA rate is 9% per- 
cent) payments on a $25,000 home 
would total $62,000 over 25 years; 
$72,000 over 30 years; $81,000 
over 35 years; and $91,000 on a 
40-year mortgage. 

An average worker making $5,- 
500 a year today would pay out as 
much as 45 percent of his earnings 
before he owned his home on a 25- 
year mortgage at the above rate. 

The main objection, then, to the 
new amendments to the federal 
housing act is that it continues 
the policy of helping those who 
need least help — the higher income 
groups. It does nothing at all by 
way of helping the majority who 




A Royal Canadian Mounted Policeman in 
front of Parliament buildings in Ottawa. 



need homes — those families with 
gross incomes under seven or eight 
thousand a year. 

It certainly does nothing for the 
low income families. 

40-Year Plans are 
Mortgages to Avoid 

The new housing changes allow 
mortgage payments over a period 
as long as 40 years. Here is what 
a leading real estate expert has to 
say about this: 

"A sharp pencil and a computer 
have convinced me that a 40-year 
mortgage should be avoided like a 
plague. . . ." and he goes on to make 
the point that a $10,000 mortgage 
for 30 years costs $8,941 less than 
for 40 years at the going rate of 
10 percent interest on conventional 
first mortgages. 

The saving in 30 years over 40 
years on a $20,000 mortgage is 
therefore $17,882.40, and a mort- 
gage of this size is not unusual now. 

Housing costs soar, as govern- 
ments take steps, not all of them 
effective, to try to resolve the hous- 
ing problem across the country, 
prices continue to soar. 

In the first three months of this 
year housing prices rose 13.7 per- 
cent to an average of $23,078 from 
$20,302 of those put up for sale. 

However in Toronto the average 
home sold for over $30,000 in the 
month of April 1969. In April 
1953, the average was $14,400; in 
1968, $27,600 and in 1967, $24,- 
680. 

Homebuilding was at a high level 
for the first three months of the 
year. Actual starts rose 45.2 per- 
cent over 1968. 

Two Major Strikes 
At Beginning of May 

Strike situations shift so rapidly 
that it is difficult to tell about them 
without soon being outdated. 

But for the record there were two 
major strikes in Canada at the be- 
ginning of May. 

The IAM struck AIR CAN- 
ADA. Over 6,000 skilled crafts- 
men walked out. The union was 
asking for a 24 percent wage in- 
crease over two years to bring the 
rates close to those effective in the 

THE CARPENTER 






U.S. on American airlines. The 
government-owned company offered 
23 percent over three years. 

The Canadian airline, one of the 
world's top ten, held its original 
wage offer within government guide- 
lines. After 10 days of strike action, 
the government announced that the 
company was free to settle the strike 
without any government interfer- 
ence. 

This probably paved the way for 
a settlement. 

The other major strike situation 
affected the building trades in Metro 
Toronto where 24,000 construction 
workers were out. The situation was 
not a normal strike action. It was 
in part, maybe a large part, a lock- 
out after negotiations failed. 

The building trades unions are 
strongly organized in this area. 
The contractors have also built up 
stronger organization than they used 
to have. 

But the odds are that the unions 
will win most of what they were 
after. The wage gains should be 
substantial. 

Union Rights for 
Ontario Employees 

The president of the 60,000- 
member Ontario Federation of La- 
bor, David Archer, has accused the 
Ontario government of depriving its 
employees of their right to "free 
association" — to free collective bar- 
gaining and the right to decide for 
themselves whether or not they wish 
to join a union. 

As many as 200,000 employees 
of the government and its agencies 
are now herded into the Civil Serv- 
ice Association of Ontario or are 
refused the right to join a union. 

Difficult Decision 
For Tommy Douglas 

T. C. "Tommy" Douglas has 
decided to remain as leader of the 
federal New Democratic Party. 

The labor-backed party is having 
its biennial convention in Winnipeg 
in October. As usual the leader is 
elected. Douglas is 64. The trend 
is to younger leadership. But after 
about 40 years of active political 
life, the NDP federal leader can 
still outdo most younger men both 
in campaigning and in parliament. 



He will be hard to replace. At 
the moment most members of the 
party, and trade unionists in particu- 
lar, want Tommy to stay. 

He has agreed to run again with 
the clear understanding that a new 
leader will contest the next federal 
election — likely to be called in 1971 
or 1972. 

Forestry is 
Thriving Industry 

Ten percent of the labor force in 
Ontario earns its livelihood from 
forestry. The percentage is much 
higher in British Columbia, but 
Ontario has so much of the indus- 
trial activity of Canada, it is some- 
times forgotten how important the 
woods industries are . . . and the 
industries based on wood. 

It is estimated that 78,000 people 
in the province are directly engaged 
in the lumber industry and an addi- 
tional 135,000 jobs are derived from 
it. In addition there are over 20,000 
employed in the furniture industry 
and many more in construction. 

Provinces Taxed 
On Varying Bases 

The Canadian Tax Foundation 
says that low-income families pay 
higher taxes in Toronto than in any 
other Canadian city. 

An average Toronto family with 
two children between ages of six 
and 16, and an income of $5,200, 
would pay $1,771 in taxes — over 
a third of its income. 

The same family would pay $90 
less in Montreal and $364 less in 
St. John's, Nfld. 



The family with income of $10,- 
400 paid most in Montreal — $3,- 
790 or 36.4 percent in taxes. 
Toronto was second highest — 35.7 
percent. 

For the family with an income 
of $52,000 a year, Edmonton was 
the cheapest place to live. Here this 
family would pay $24,273 in taxes 
or 46.7 percent. In Montreal they 
would pay $27,039 or 52 percent. 

Of course, high income families 
usually have non-taxable or low- 
taxed sources of income like divi- 
dends, capital gains. 

Insurance Groups May 
Lose Tax Exemptions 

At long last Canadian insurance 
companies are going to have to pay 
taxes somewhat in line with their 
earnings or profits. Over the years, 
these companies have gotten away 
with more tax exemptions than any 
other major group of corporations. 

The Carter Commission showed 
that they paid not much more than 
about three percent in corporation 
taxes against an average of about 
45 percent. 

The new legislation introduced in 
the House of Commons by Finance 
Minister Benson will charge insur- 
ance companies normal corporation 
profit taxes of 52 percent after 
allowing for deductible business 
expenses. 

However this regulation is not to 
take effect until 1970. 

It will be interesting to see what 
actual taxes these huge companies 
will pay. In other words, are there 
loopholes? 




A work boat pushes its waj through :i log boom in an Ontario river, 
of the labor force in Ontario earns its livelihood from forestry. 



fen percent 



JUNE, 1969 



15 






EDITORIALS 



* Know-Nothingism, 1969 

Just before the Civil War, when turmoil and unrest 
were widespread throughout the nation, there devel- 
oped a movement known as "Know-Nothingism." The 
Know-Nothings actually had no program of their own, 
but they did have a very low regard for those who 
wielded the power in the universities and the various 
arms of government. Actually, it was anti-intellectual- 
ism, pure and simple. 

In view of the turmoil which now exists on college 
campuses, in many of the churches and in various 
branches of the government, there is a distinct pos- 
sibility that Know-Nothingism may make a come-back. 
If it does, it will be largely because those who make 
up the academic community and occupy the various 
seats of power in our society have abrogated their 
responsibilities. Too many of them are perched on 
Cloud 9, out of touch with reality and at odds with 
plain, common sense. 

Recently a sociologist — a Harvard one at that — 
made a profound observation that discrimination 
against Negroes in the skilled trades will not be com- 
pletely eliminated until the Year 2017. It is statements 
of this kind and asinine statistics of this ilk that hasten 
the return of Know-Nothingism. 

In the first place, discrimination can never be elimi- 
nated in this world. There is discrimination by Catho- 
lics against Protestants and Protestants against Catho- 
lics. There is discrimination against Jews and by Jews. 
There is discrimination against sex and color of hair. 
A girl with bowlegs and buck teeth has never been 
elected as Miss America and probably never will be. 
Consequently, the girls with bowlegs and buck teeth 
will be victims of discrimination for a long time to 
come. And while we're on the subject of beauty con- 
tests, using the same techniques that the Harvard so- 
ciologist used, it is a foregone conclusion that Miss 
America of the Year 2045 will be eight feet, two inches 
tall. In the past 15 years, beauty contest winners have 
increased in height by two inches. If you project this 
statistic for the next 75 or 80 years, you come up with 
an eight-foot winner. 

The only object of this piece is to point out that 
there are many "experts" in this nation obfuscating 
rather than illuminating the situation in all the prob- 
lems confronting us. Discrimination against minority 



groups in the skilled trades will be eliminated when 
the members of the minorities make the effort to quali- 
fy themselves for training in the skilled trades and 
professions, and it will come when the people already 
in the skilled trades and professions realize that there 
is a law in the land that makes discrimination illegal. 
If the Harvard professor wants to chew on some 
statistics, he might take a look at the figures recently 
released by the Department of Labor. These figures 
show that there was an increase of almost 20% last 
year in the number of minority-group apprentices in 
the building trades. Project these figures for another 
50 years, and you come up with the answer that 
1000% of the building trades will be minority 
groups. 

•'•'•' 'Loaf ot Bread, Jug of Wine' 

There was a time when the average camel driver 
in the little sheikdom of Kuwait never knew where 
his next leg of mutton was coming from. That was 
before petroleum started flowing from beneath the 
desert sands. 

Today, the little country of Kuwait — only two- 
thirds the size of Maryland with a population of 
532,000— has annual oil revenues of $759,000,000, 
or $122,855 for each square mile of the little country. 

Kuwait has a money problem . . . not how to raise 
it but how to spend it all. Kuwaitis, as the people 
are called, have a life free of personal income taxes, 
medical and hospital expenses, and education costs. 
Public telephones are free. Most earnings are dis- 
tributed to the people through an ingenious system 
of real estate transfers. The government keeps buy- 
ing desert and oasis land from private owners, pay- 
ing ever-increasing prices. The same land is sold 
and resold. Large landowners become millionaires 
overnight; small holders become affluent. 

The system benefits only Kuwaitis, who number 
about half the population, since they alone are per- 
mitted to buy, sell, or own land. 

Omar Khayyam's dream of the meditative life 
beneath a date palm, with a loaf of bread, a jug of 
wine, etc., has come true in this air-conditioned 
sheikdom on the Persian Gulf. 

If only other pockets of poverty around the world 
could be solved so simply! 



16 



THE CARPENTER 




A Ti 



ime 



f< 



or 



Flag Waving 



June 14 marks the 192nd 
Birthday of the Stars and Stripes 



■ June 14 is Flag Day in the 
United States, set aside to call at- 
tention to the National Emblem. 
Although it is desirable for citizens 
of the United States to display their 
flag on every day of the year, it is 
especially appropriate on this anni- 
versary. 

The anniversary which Flag Day 
commemorates is that day in 1777 
when the Continental Congress in 
Philadelphia officially adopted the 
Stars and Stripes as our National 
Emblem. Only in Pennsylvania is 
the day a legal holiday. 

The observance of the day was 
first advocated by Dr. B. J. Cigrand, 
who founded an association in 1895 
to promote it. The patriotic obser- 
vance has become an important one 
for the nation's school children and 
it has become customary for resi- 
dences and businesses to display Old 
Glory on that day. 

Every nation has its emblem, and 
many people throughout the world 
hold that the U.S. flag is the most 
beautiful of all national emblems. 

The largest U.S. flag, largest flag 
in the world, is the one displayed on 
the Woodward Avenue side of the 
J. L. Hudson Company department 
store in Detroit. It measures 104 
feet by 235 feet and weighs 1,500 
pounds. It was first unfurled on Flag 
Day in 1949. The 50 stars are each 
SVz feet high and each stripe is eight 
feet wide. 



The oldest national flag in the 
world, dating from 1219, is that of 
Denmark, consisting of a large white 
cross on a red field, known as the 
Dannebrog ("Danish cloth"). 

In this day and time, when radi- 
cals and dissidents stress their dis- 
satisfaction with existing conditions 
by burning, stomping and otherwise 
desecrating this symbol of the na- 
tion, it is particularly appropriate 
that loyal citizens show their respect 
for their nation and its flag, even 
though they may not agree with 
some present programs and condi- 
tions. They are free to work for and 
vote for changes, but at the same 
time they accord their flag the re- 
spect due to it as the symbol of a 
great nation with more opportunities 
for everyone and the highest stand- 
ard of living in the world. 

The Proper Salute 

There are proper ways to respect 
and salute the American Flag which 
everyone should know and practice. 
A man wearing a hat should remove 
it and place it over his heart. Women 
place their right hand over the heart 
but do not, of course, remove their 
hats. If a man is not wearing a hat, 
he, too, places his hand over his 
heart and stands at attention. 

The American Flag, when carried 
in a procession with another flag or 
flags, should be either on the march- 
ing right or, if there is a line of 



other flags, in front of the center 
of that line. It should not be dis- 
played on a parade float except from 
a staff or suspended so its fold falls 
as free as if it were staffed. 

When on Display 

No other flag should ever be 
placed above it or, if at the same 
level, to the right of The Flag. An 
exception is during church services 
at military installations where the 
church pennant may be flown above 
it. The Flag, when displayed with 
another flag against a wall with 
crossed staffs, should be on the right 
(The Flag's own right) and its 
staff should be in front of the other 
staff. When flags of states or lo- 
calities are displayed with The Flag 
in a group. The Flag should be in 
the center and at the highest point. 

When flown from a common staff 
with other flags or pennants. The 
Flag should be at the peak. When 
other flags are flown from adjacent 
poles. The Flag should be hoisted 
first and lowered last. 

When the flags of two or more 
nations are displayed, all should be 
flown from separate staffs of equal 
height and all should be approxi- 
mately equal in size. International 
usage forbids the display of the 
flag of one nation above that of 
another nation in time of peace. 

When The Flag is displayed from 
Continued on page 21 



JUNE, 1969 



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Employers Illegally Keeping 
Withholding Taxes On The Rise 

U.S. employers during 1968 withheld $339,428,000 from 
the paychecks of their workers that they did not return to 
the U.S. Treasury by law. 

This was reported to the Senate by Senator John Williams 
(R.-Del.) in making what he called his "15th annual report 
on the inventory of delinquent taxpayer accounts." 

Williams said that the illegally kept withholding taxes in 
1968 represent an increase of 32 percent over 1967. 

"It should be emphasized," he said, "that employment taxes 
are deducted from the pay envelopes of employees by em- 
ployers and that these monies do not belong to the employer." 

"The expanded delinquencies in this category, therefore, are 
indefensible. These monies should be treated as trust funds 
and the government should not condone these continuous 
delinquencies, ofttimes the same companies." 

Williams cited "very poor collection records" in Brooklyn 
and Manhattan in New York City, Jacksonville, Fla., Austin 
and Dallas, Texas, Los Angeles, Reno, Nev. and New Or- 
leans, La. 

In the regional breakdown, $120,847,000 was illegally kept 
withholding taxes from the North Atlantic region, $44,225,000 
from the Mid-Atlantic region, $31,536,000 from the South- 
east, $36,828,000 from the Central region, $29,441,000 from 
the Midwest region, $34,449,000 from the Southwest. $39,- 
909.000 from the Western region, and $2,193,000 from inter- 
national operations. 

"It should be emphasized over and over," Williams de- 
clared, "that the employment taxes do not belong to the em- 
ployer. These monies withheld — the income taxes, Social Se- 
curity taxes, and so forth — are withheld by the employers 
but they belong to the employees." 

He said that he has asked the Treasury Department "to 
give their special attention to those areas where taxes are not 
being paid in line with the national average." 

Labor Department Lays Down 
New Age-Discrimination Rules 

The U.S. Department of Labor has laid down a series of 
new regulations designed to carry out recently enacted leg- 
islation against arbitrary wage discrimination in employment 
against workers from 40 to 65 years old. 

The new interpretations, effective immediately, include 
these: 

The act authorizes involuntary retirement irrespective of 
age if such retirement is pursuant to the terms of a bona fide 
retirement or pension plan. The authorization does not apply, 
however, to the involuntary retirement of employees under 
age 65 who are not participants in the employer's retirement 
or pension program. 

Discriminatory activities committed within the geographic 
areas covered by the act are illegal even when the activities 
are related to employment outside these areas. 

It is considered discriminatory for an employer to specify 
that he will hire only persons receiving old age Social Security 
insurance benefits. 

An employer who pays an age-based wage differential in 
violation of the act cannot correct the violation by reducing 
the wage of the higher-paid employee. 

Age limitations for entry into bona fide apprenticeship 
programs were not intended to be affected by the act. 

An employer is not required to provide older workers with 
the same pension, retirement, or insurance benefits he pro- 
vides to younger workers, provided that any differential be- 
tween them is in accordance with the terms of a bona fide 
benefit plan. 

The use of a validated employment test is not. in itself, a 
violation of the Act. When such tests are used as the sole 
tool or the controlling factor in employee hiring, however, 
they will be carefully scrutinized by the Wage and Hour 
and Public Contracts Division to make sure they do not 
discriminate against older persons. 



18 



THE CARPENTER 




Two Thirtieth Anniversaries Are Commemorated in Louisiana 




Plaques were presented to officers of the local union by Retired General Executive 
Board Member Henry Chandler, second from left, front row. Also shown in the 
picture are Financial Secretary Herman Sonier, President Felix Blanchard, First 
General Vice President Allan. Back row: Trustee Maurice Thibodeaux, Recording 
Secretary Leland Ledet, Jr., Conductor Winnie Dupuy, Warden Alva Hill, Treasurer 
Leland Ledet, Sr., and Trustee Alcide Liner. Trustee Roy Doucet was unable to be 
present for the presentation. 




Herman Sonier, financial secretary and business agent of Local 2258, is justly proud 
of his six sons, who are all members of the union. Here he is with five of them, their 
wives, and Mrs. Sonier. From left, the Soniers include: Dewey and wife. Betty; Earl 
and wife. Marguerite; the father, Herman, and wife, Rachel; Herman D. and wife, 
Verly; and Charles and wife, Alice. The youngest son, Donald, an apprentice, was 
not present for the picture. All Houma is proud of them, too. 

BACK COVER: Three years ago, C. W '. Churchficld, former president of Local 
362. Pueblo, Colo., asked if we could obtain for his local union hall a reprint of 
"The Psalm of the Free Rider." At the time we were unable to do so. Since then 
we've located "The Free Rider's Creed", which is the same thing under another 
title. It appears on the Inside Back Cover of this issue . . . suitable for framing. 



First General Vice President Finlay 
C. Allan was in the State of Louisiana 
last April to join the Louisiana State 
Council of Carpenters in an observance 
of its 30th birthday. While in the state. 
he was also able to join in another 30th 
anniversary celebration — that of Carpen- 
ter, Millwrights, and Pile Drivers Local 
2258 of Houma. La. 

Vice President Allan was presented an 
honorary citizenship certificate and a key 
to the city of Houma by Dave P. La- 
borde, on behalf of the mayor, Charles 
Davidson. 

Among the visitors to the local cele- 
bration were Henry Chandler, retired 
General Executive Board member. Inter- 
national Representative Dennis Spear, 
and Don Gilbert, president of the state 
council. Service pins were presented dur- 
ing the anniversary ceremonies. (A pic- 
ture of the veteran members who received 
pins will be published in the July issue 
under "Service to the Brotherhood.") 



What Is It? 




Orlan Gilbert, member of Local 1606, 
Omaha, Nebraska, and proprietor of 
Gilbert Brothers Construction in nearby 
Farragut, sends in the photo above, ask- 
ing if readers can identify it. It looks 
like an original gismo to us. Or maybe 
it's some kind of modern sculpture. Per- 
haps Brother Gilbert is pulling our leg. 
Any readers know what it is? 



JUNE, 1969 



19 



Chalk Lines! 

A carpenter is never, "Board", 
That's very "Plane", to see. 
He's always on the "Level", 
When he plays "Square" with me. 

He'll "Brace" his feet a little "Bit", 
When the job is extra tough, 
He "Plans" His "Elevations", 
When the work is in the "Rough". 

He "adz" his "estimations", 

To things he "saw" today. 

Should things look bum, He makes them 

"Plumb", 
And puts them there to "stay". 

He may be on the "Ridge", today, 
Tomorrow in the "Gutter", 
It's not a "frame," it's in the game, 
You never see him "shutter". 

One golden "rule" he favors most, 
Is "Plane" withholding "Tacks", 
His "hammer" blow will tell you so, 
Or chopping with his "Axe." 

A "lintel" bit of sunshine. 
Will not cause a "Window-pane", 
We all "a-door" a worker, 
In the sunshine, and the rain. 

A "batter" world it's bound to be, 

When we get on the "beam". 

So walk your "chalk-line" straight, Mr. 

Boy, 
This is no time to dream. 

The "footing" you may have today, 
Is what we "awl", are "rafter" 
So take a squint, at your "blueprint," 
The one that brings the laughter. 

Should you get in a "window-jamb"? 
Have trouble with the "stool", 
Just keep your old "nail-apron" on, 
A "Smile", is your best tool. . . . 

— Billy Mundt 

Table Full of Work 



109 Retired Florida Carpenters 
Receive Their First Pension Checks 




Henry Luther of Local 436, New Al- 
bany, Intl., above, is a master mechanic 
and a man who enjoys turning his craft 
skills into ornamental and useful objects 
at home. Here he is shown with a model 
of a covered wagon and a table full of 
his novel creations. 




One-hundred-nine retired carpenters in 
22 northeast Florida counties received 
their first pension checks recently from 
the Joint Trust Committee of the Car- 
penters District Council of the Jackson- 
ville area and the Northeastern Florida 
Chapter, Associated General Contractors. 

Twenty-three retirees were present to 
receive benefit checks. Front row, left to 
right: Van Pittman, international repre- 
sentative; Jim H. Grimsley; Clyde W. 
McQuerry; Willie L. Rabb; Andrew S. 
Gravesen; 93-year-old senior pensioner, 
James C. Pittman; Ysidro R. Mallo; Dan- 
iel Leiterman; Edmund E. Scydick; and 
Houston H. Chirty. Second row, left to 
right: Emmert V. Spicer; James B. Mollis: 
Christopher C. Coley; Plez D. Cauley; 
James E. Brooks; Frank Newsome; and 
R. L. Bowling. Third row, left to right: 
John Pelo; John W. Moody; William O. 
Taylor; Laurie W. Goodin; Joseph A. 
Baggs; Coy J. Bunting; and Henley E. 
Adams. Back row: Joint Trust Fund Com- 
mittee. 

Charlie C. Howell, president of the 
Jacksonville and Vicinity District Coun- 
cil and business representative of Local 
627, remarked that this had been the 
first time in the South that a pension plan 
for union carpenters had been initiated. 




International Representative, Van Pitt- 
man, is congratulating his 93-year-old 
father, James C. Pittman of Local 627, 
upon receiving his first pension check 
from the Jacksonville, Florida and Vi- 
cinity Trust Fund Retirement Program. 



Local 104 Honors 
Oldest Member 

Since 1966, a traditional plaque has 
been awarded to the oldest active car- 
penter in Local 104, Dayton, Ohio. In 
1968 Ray C. Vore was the proud recipient 
of this award. Brother Vore is 86 years 
of age and a resident of Dayton. He 
served his local as president for several 
years during the 1940's and has received 
25, 40, and 50-year membership pins. It 
is believed that his sincere dedication as a 
union member has been a guiding light 
and encouragement for the Brotherhood 
since 1912. 

The "Oldest Active Member" award 
was presented to Frank Calloway in 1966 
and to John Zwirner in 1967. 




Ray C. Vore, the oldest member of Local 
104 in 1968, received a plaque from Ray 
Evans, financial secretary. 



20 



THE CARPENTER 




Flag Waving 

Continued from page 17 

a staff projecting horizontally or at 
an angle from a window sill, bal- 
cony or front of a building, the un- 
ion of The Flag (the blue field) 
should be at the peak of the staff 
unless The Flag is at half-mast as a 
sign of mourning. If The Flag is 
suspended from a rope over a side- 
walk extending from a building. 
The Flag should be hoisted out, un- 
ion first, from the building. 

Indoors or Out 

When The Flag is displayed oth- 
erwise than by being flown from a 
staff, indoors or out, it should be 
displayed flat. When displayed over 
the middle of a street, it should be 
suspended vertically with the union 
to the north in an east-west street 
or to the east in a north-south street. 

When displayed from a staff in 
the chancel of a church or on the 
speaker's platform in a public audi- 
torium. The Flag should occupy the 
position of honor and be placed at 
the speaker's right. Any other flag 
should be at the speaker's left as he 
faces the audience. But. when The 
Flag is displayed elsewhere than on 
the platform, it should be placed at 
the right of those in the audience as 
they face the platform and other 
Hags should be to the left of the 
audience. 



When used on a speaker's plat- 
form and displayed flat above it. 
The Flag should be placed with the 
union to the speaker's right. The 
Flag should be a feature of the 
ceremony of unveiling a statue or 
monument but should never be used 
as the covering of the statue or mon- 
ument. It should never be used as 
a draping in lieu of bunting. 

When used to cover a casket, the 
union should be at the head and 
over the left shoulder. The Flag 
should never be lowered into the 
grave nor allowed, any instance, 
to touch the ground. When hoist- 
ing The Flag for flying at half-mast. 
it is raised first to the peak, then 
lowered to the half-mast position. 
The Flag should be raised again to 
full-staff for an instant before be- 
ing lowered for the day. 

When the National Anthem is 
played and The Flag is not dis- 
played, all present should face the 
music. If The Flag is displayed, 
those present should face The Flag 
regardless of where the music comes 
from and render the appropriate 
salute. 

Display at Night 

Ordinarily The Flag is not dis- 
played at night but this may be var- 
ied if it is desired to produce a 
patriotic effect. It should not be dis- 
played in the rain or other inclem- 
ent weather. Regardless of the prac- 
tice observed at many baseball and 
football games. The Flag should 
properly be hoisted up briskly but 
lowered slowly and ceremoniously. 
At many stadiums. The Flag ascends 
slowly to last out the playing of The 
National Anthem. On Memorial Day 
The Flag should be flown at half- 
mast until noon, then raised to the 
peak. 

The Flag is never dipped to any- 
one or anything. Other colors may 
be dipped by marchers in passing as 
a mark of respect or as a salute but 
the American Flag is never dipped. 
It should never be displayed with 
the union down except as a sign of 
distress. It must never be gathered, 
draped, tacked or drawn in any dec- 
orative attempts. It must never be 
used as a ceiling covering. Nothing 
must ever be attached to or over 
Continued on page 23 




Y 



i 




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to 1 y 2 ", Si. 50 each. 

2. Irwin No. 22 Micro-Dial expansive bit. Fits 
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. . . those members of our Brotherhood 
who, in recent weeks, have been named 
or elected to public offices, have won 
awards, or who have, in other ways, 
"stood out from the crowd." This 
month, our editorial hat is off to the 
following: 




STATE POST— William H. Lanam of Local 
1664, Bloomington, Incl., left above, was 
recently sworn in as Commissioner of 
Labor for the State of Indiana. A mem- 
ber of the Brotherhood for more than 
30 years, he has been associated in the 
building trades with contractors in Indi- 
ana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Nebraska. 
Lanam's appointment was recommended 
to Governor Edgar Whitcomb by the 
Indiana State AFL-CIO. 

STATE COPE DIRECTOR— Robert E. Brown, 
former business agent for Carpenters 
Local 2230. Greensboro, N.C., has joined 
the staff of the North Carolina State 
AFL-CIO office as state COPE director. 

Brown will spend most of his time in 
the field visiting central labor unions. He 
will maintain his home in Greensboro. 

He is a native of Greensboro, where 
he attended public schools. He is a vet- 
eran of three years' service with the U.S. 
Navy during World War II, with service 
in the Pacific Theater. 

Following his discharge from service, 
Brown joined Local 2230 in 1946. He 
was named business agent in 1957 and 
served in that capacity until February, 
1969, when he resigned to accept appoint- 
ment to the state staff. 

In addition to his duties as business 
agent for his local, Brown has held many 
other union offices. He served as secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Greensboro Build- 
ing Trades and the N.C. Building Trades, 
president of the N.C. State Council of 
Carpenters, vice president of the South- 
eastern Building Trades, president of the 
Greensboro Central Labor Union and 
vice president of the State AFL-CIO. 



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22 



THE CARPENTER 



More Unusual Hammers 





HAND FILED NOTCH 



Our recent feature on the double- 
clawed hammer (December. 1968, 
issue, Page 38, and February. 1969. 
issue. Page 14) stimulated some think- 
ing among our readers about other 
hammers with specialty uses. Here 
are two. (Before reading on, try to 
guess their purposes.) 

A sketch of the top hammer, shown 
in top and side views, was submitted 
by Mrs. Smith M. Gray of Wilming- 
ton. Illinois. We had a draftsman pre- 
pare a finished drawing, and we are 
told that the slot and bearing unit is 
intended to pull out small-headed 
nails which are not grasped readily 
by the claws. The bearings roll back 
and forth and adjust to the size of the 
nail inserted in the slot. 

The second hammer, shown at bot- 
tom in two variations, was described 
and sketched for us by Henry H. 
Tompkins, Jr., age 73 and a 55-year 
member of Local 282, Jersey City. 
N. J. Tompkins says the origin of 
this hammer was a notch filed in the 
adze eye metal of either 16- or 20-oz. 
claw hammers. The notch was used, 
instead of a monkey wrench, to add 
or remove nuts on bolts used as form 
ties before the days of the "Snap 
Form Tyes." He first saw this type 
of hammer in the New York City 
area in 1913 while serving as an ap- 
prentice. 

A construction superintendent 
named Richard Haas patented the 
idea, and a multiple-notch hammer 
similar to the one shown was mar- 
keted by Plumb. 

As Tompkins indicates, the notched 
hammer was useful in turning nuts for 
5-8 -inch bolts, as it operated somewhat 
similar to a ratchet wrench. 



new 



Flag Waving 

Continued from page 21 

it. It should never be imprinted 
for advertising purposes nor used on 
cushions, handkerchiefs, paper nap- 
kins, or the like, nor used as any 
portion of a costume. 

A soiled flag should not be dis- 
played. When The Flag is obviously 
soiled, send it to a cleaner. Most 
cleaners will not make any charge 
for drycleaning your flag when it is 
included with personal articles. 

When worn and frayed and no 
longer suitable for display. The Flag 
should be disposed of in a dignified 



manner, not simply tossed in a trash 
can. Burning in a respectful manner 
is the preferred disposition of a 
tattered flag. 

Many merchants are featuring 
flags, staffs and brackets for holding 
them this year. Every home should 
have a flag and display it. Why not 
display your flag on Flag Day and 
other appropriate days throughout 
the year? 



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your finster is large enough to keep. If 
you're lucky enough to have a dollar bill 
in your pocket you can solve the problem. 
Just lay it 'longside the fish. The bill 
measures six inches. 

■ Ontario Luck 



By FRED GOETZ 

Readers may write to Fred Goetz at 2833 S.E. 33rd Place, Portland, Oregon 97202 




■ Heck of a Hake 

Harold Westman of Mahwah. New 
Jersey, a member of Local 15 at Hacken- 
sack. has flung many a baited line over 
the bulwark of 
charter boats, ply- 
ing the briny off 
his native shores. 
He's caught a few 
and lost a few, but. 
recently, in his own 
words, he "caught 
the big one that 
didn't get away." 

A letter and pho- 
tograph from Mrs. 
Westman records 
his catch, a 33-lb. 
silver hake which 
he nailed while 
Westman fishing off Captain 

Ken Silva's "Bar- 
bara Lee." The lunker won him not only 
daily ship pool but proved to be the 
largest taken from Silva's craft all season. 

■ Moon Musings 

Recent moon trips bring to mind the 
following timely poetry by longtime- 
friend Elmer Ryland of Vancouver, 
Wash.: 

Do you suppose it will be soon, 
We'll do our fishing on the moon? 
For from reports the wise ones say 
We'll get there now most any day. 
When we get transportation there, 
The first one landing you're aware 
Will be the dealers staking claims 
With selling real estate their aims. 
They'll advertise the choicest view 
Where moonbeams cast a glow on you 
If I get there, will be my wish 
To trek along the streams and fish 
And get the thrill and great delight 
Of landing rainbows by moonlight. 

■ Walleye String 

One of the best catches of walleye 
we've heard tell about in quite a spell can 
be credited to three anglers from Grand 
Forks, North Dakota, all members of 




Wendel and Friends 

Local 2028: Robert Wendel, his son Jerry 
Wendel, and Tom Miller. 

Here's a photograph of the happy fish- 
ermen with their outstanding walleye 
catch taken from the famous Lake of the 
Woods off Springsteel Island, situated 
about eight miles north of Warroad, Min- 
nesota in the northern section of the 
state. Largest walleye in the catch was a 
six pounder, taken by Robert Wendel. 

■ Two at a Time 

Mid-west correspondent Mort Clavey 
reports that Art Sarbacker of Portage, 
Wisconsin, can justly lay claim to catch- 
ing the greediest fish that swims. Seems 
like Art was doing a little prospecting at 
a near-home lake for bluegills when he 
noticed an impressive commotion on the 
water's surface nearby. 

He concluded that a large fish caused 
the disturbance and immediately removed 
his light terminal tackle, switched to 
heavier gear and started casting near the 
commotion. Shortly thereafter his rod's 
tip went plunging down and he sub- 
sequently pulled in 28 inches of fish. An 
18-inch northern pike with a 10-inch bass 
in its mouth! 

■ Quick Measure 

Situation: You're out on the river with- 
out a ruler and you want to make sure 




Senior and Junior Sharrs 

Getting back to walleye pike, we're 
bound to record chunky specimen caught 
by Walter B. Sharr of Connellsville, Pa., 
a retired member of Local 2274 at Pitts- 
burgh. Somehow we overlooked report- 
ing it in past issues. I'm referring to a 
11% pounder taken by Brother Sharr on 
a junket to the north country of Ontario. 
Here's a photograph of him with his prize 
finster and son Clayton, president of that 
local for many years, and an angler like 
his dad. 

■ Spent Powder: 

According to a letter and photograph 
from Holly B. Simpson of Los Angeles, 
California, he and Jack Smith both mem- 
bers of Local 284 really hit the hunter's 
jackpot this past season, and he sends in 
the following proof of his claim, showing 
five deer hanging in the trees which they 
and other members of party downed in 
Colorado near Montrose. 




Simpson and Deer 

A note from W. B. Sanders, financial 
secretary and business agent of Local 559 
in Paducah, Kentucky, brings us up to 
date on McCracken County Coon Club 
which, we're told, put out about $2,600 



24 



THE CARPENTER 



stocking coons in the area. And from 
what we hear, it's paying off in some 
wonderful coon hunting thereabouts. En- 
closed with Sanders' note was following 
photograph of James H. Bruce, also a 
member of Local 559. and his hunt 
partner displaying 1 1 racoons brought in 
after but three hours on trail. Brother 
Bruce is treasurer of the McCracken 
County Coon Club. 




V. 



Bruce, Partner and Coons 

One of the nicest looking bucks we've 
heard about from - r ^. 
last season's hunt 
can be credited to 
Glenn Solum of 
Gurnee. Illinois, a 
member of Local 
448 in Waukegan. 
Here's a photo- 
graph of Glenn 
with his prize, 
downed ten min- 
utes after the sea- 
son opened in Wis- 
consin. He nailed 
it in the wildwoods 
out of Hayward, an 
8-pointer, no less. 




Solum 



When Fishermen Meet: 

Hiyamac. 
Lobuddy. 

Binearlong? 

Coplours. 

Catchanenny? 

Goddafew. 

Kindarthey? 

Bassencrappie. 

Enysizetoem? 

Cuplapowns. 

Hitendard? 

Sordalike. 

Watchoozin? 

Gobbaworms. 

Fishonabotom? 

Rydownonabotom. 



Clue produced by barnacles has twice 
the strength of any commercial glue now 
on the market. The natural adhesive 
hardens in salt water and withstands more 
than 7,000 pounds of force. 



Biologists estimate that there are 25.000 
species of fish. How many kinds have 
you caught? 




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Name 




Atre 




Address 


City 


State 


/ 


in 


Occupation 









Accredited Member Notional Home Study Council 



JUNE, 1969 



25 




What's New in 

Apprenticeship 
& Training 



1969 Appr 


enticeship Con 


test 


Calc 

Mill- 


indar 

Mill- 


State, Province 


Date Carpenter 


Cabinet 


Wright 


Alabama 


April 10, 11, & 12, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Alaska 


June 20 & 21, 1969 


X 






Arizona 


April 26, 1969 


X 






California 


June 18, 19, 20 & 21, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Colorado 


May 24, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


* Delaware 


June 4, 1969 


X 






District Of Columbia 


Apr. 26 & May 3, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Florida 


May 15, 1969 


X 






Illinois 


May 8 & 9, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


* Indiana 


June 20 & 21, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Iowa 


June 13 & 14, 1969 


X 






Kansas 




X 


X 


X 


Louisiana 


July 12 & 13, 1969 


X 




X 


* Maine 




X 






Massachusetts 


June 13 & 14, 1969 


X 


X 




Michigan 


May 26 & 27, 1969 


X 




X 


Minnesota 


June 19, 1969 


X 






Missouri 


May 17, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


* Nebraska 


June 28, 1969 


X 






Nevada 


April 18 & 19, 1969 


X 


X 




New Jersey 


May 9 & 10, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


New Mexico 


June 7, 1969 


X 






New York 


July 16, 17 & 18, 1969 


X 






Ohio 


May 27 & 28, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Oklahoma 


June 19 & 20, 1969 


X 






Oregon 


May 23 & 24, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Pennsylvania 


April 11, & 12, 1969 


X 


X 


X 


Tennessee 


May 2 & 3, 1969 


X 






Texas 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 




X 


Utah 


May 17 & 24, 1969 


X 






Virginia 


April 26, 1969 


X 






Washington 


June 5, 6&7, 1969 


X 


X 




Wisconsin 


May 2 & 3, 1969 


X 






Alberta 


April 24 & 25, 1969 


X 






British Columbia 


June 20 & 21, 1969 


X 






Manitoba 


June 6 & 7, 1969 


X 






Ontario 


May 29 & 30, 1969 


X 




X 


Saskatchewan 




X 






TOTALS 




38 


15 


16 



*New States entering 1969 contest. 

INTERNATIONAL CONTEST: The 1969 international apprenticeship 
competition is scheduled to be held at the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, 
111, August 13-16. Registration will be held August 13; the contest, 14th 
and 15th; the banquet August 16. 

26 



THE FRAMING SQUARE 

The Home Study Course on the 
Framing Square has now been 
compiled into a unit and is avail- 
able through the regular ordering 
sources at the cost of 30 cents per 
copy. 



Arizona Winner 




Mr. and Mrs. Richard I lollimoii 

The Arizona Carpenters' Apprentice- 
ship Committee sponsored its Tenth An- 
nual Apprentice Carpenters' Contest at 
Phoenix Union High School on Saturday, 
April 26. 

Richard K. Hollimon of Tucson, Local 
857, pictured with his wife, was the 
winner and will represent Arizona in the 
International Contest in Chicago, Illi- 
nois, this summer. 

The Awards Dinner, held the same 
evening at the Hotel Adams, was also 
the occasion for Bob Barrett, a member 
of the Committee and also a member 
of the Arizona Apprenticeship Council, 
to present a Meritorious Certificate to 
Jerry Hofman, now retired, who served 
for 25 years as financial secretary of Lo- 
cal 1089. During this quarter century he 
also served as one of the original mem- 
bers of the Arizona Apprenticeship Coun- 
cil and for 12 years (since its inception) 
as a member and treasurer of the Arizona 
Carpenters' Apprenticeship Committee. 
This committee meets monthly, and 
Jerry managed to attend more than 95% 
of the meetings. 




Bob Barrett, Jerry Hofman 

THE CARPENTER 




AADTA Graduation Ceremonies Held in Detroit 



A large group of young men recently completed their train- 
ing with Local 982 and other local unions of Detroit, Mich., 
under the Federal Manpower Development and Training Pro- 
gram. Participants in the graduation ceremonies, above, in- 
cluded: FIRST ROW, from left, Wesley Smith, William Sep- 
trion, Clifford Mortimer, Ralph Graves, Walter Martynow 
(instructor), Ralph Wood (president. 982), Vernon Ellsworth 
(financial secretary and business representative, 982), John Har- 
rington (sec.-treas., district council), Fred Turner (instructor, 
982), and Robert Bell, all of 982, and Kevin Argue, 337. SEC- 
OND ROW, Harold Mason. Jr., James Young, Hollie Keeran, 
Frank Greenhalgh, Roy Stockslager, Herman Borst, Chester 
Pomeroy, Kenneth Chandler, Edward Bis, all of 982, Gunby 
Prelowe, 1513, and Wilbert Rajala, 982. THIRD ROW, Olaf 
Hotvcdt, William Breslin, Jack Taylor, Clifford Olson, Stellini 
Marino, Dale Chambers, Jack Prystup, Everett Mullins, Albert 
Haskins, Jr., William Coughenour, Charles Price, August 
Spencer, George Betz Kenneth Pascoe, James Gisner, and 
Leonard Blackwood, all of 982. 

In the picture at right, high scorers were honored. From left 
are: Financial Secretary Ellsworth; Leonard Blackwood, grad- 




uate, high score 92%; District Council Secretary Harrington; 
William Septroin. graduate, high score 88.5%; 982 President 
Wood; James Gisner, graduate, high score 92%; Instructor 
Turner; and Instructor Martynow. 



Graduation 
Ceremony 
Held in Spokane 

The Spokane, Washington, Carpenters 
Joint Apprenticeship Committee and the 
Spokane Pilcdrivers Joint Training Com- 
mittee held a graduation ceremony re- 
cently for apprentices and trainees who 
have recently completed their journeymen 
requirements. 

Recipients of certificates of completion 
arc, left to right: Gerald Weincr, Frank 
Simpkins, Richard Schab. Clyde Matlock. 
Daniel Holland and Paul Eggett. Frank 
Simpkins, pictured in the group, was a 
pilcdrivcr trainee. 




JUNE, 1969 



27 




SUPILOWSKI-SCREW 
fastens wall 
bracket to 

wa 




HEX NUT 
fastens hammer 
holder to wall 
bracket (screw 
on completely 
before removing) 



WALL BRACKET 





o o o 




DOUBLED -CLAWED HAMMER HOLDER 

DOUBLE VISION? — D. F. Howard, financial secretary of Local 325, Pater- 
son, N.J., was stimulated to invention and intrigue by our discussion of 
double-clawed hammers and "Supilowski screw" in the February issue of 
The CARPENTER. He designed a holder for the double-clawed hammer and 
submitted the Rube Goldberg classic above for our readers consideration. 



Detroit CDC-Sponsored Welding Course Completed 




John Harrington, left, secretary-treasurer of the Carpenters Detroit, Mich., District 
Council, was on hand for this final class of a 13-week arc welding course sponsored 
by the CDC under the auspices of the Manpower Development and Training Act 
at Cody High School. The 80-hour night course, the first of a series, was conducted 
by instructor Carrol Thurston, center. He is surrounded by some of the approxi- 
mately 20 members of CDC-affiliated locals who completed the welding program. 
Anthony "Pete" Ochocki, a former Detroiter now based in Washington, is project 
co-ordinator of the MDTA program for the United Brotherhood. 



NLRB Protects Right 
of Worker in Bucket- 
of-Heat Grievance 

The National Labor Relations Board 
feels strongly about the right of a worker 
to file a grievance procedure and has just 
reiterated that feeling. 

The Board went to the extent of revers- 
ing a Trial Examiner who took the posi- 
tion that the firing of a worker was not 
due to his demand to file a grievance but 
was legitimate. The Board held other- 
wise. 

The case involved John H. Puckett, a 
member of Concrete Product Workers 
Local Union 217 of the Laborers Inter- 
national Union, and Price Brothers Com- 
pany of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Puckett was fired after an altercation 
over a fire he had built in a bucket to 
keep warm in a huge, drafty building 
heated only by portable stoves. He was 
just back from an attack of influenza and 
the day was cold and drizzly. 

A foreman ordered Puckett to put out 
the fire and, when Puckett refused, put 
out the fire himself after a heated argu- 
ment. He then told Puckett to get a port- 
able heater from the far end of the block- 
long building. Puckett again refused. 

Some time later the foreman returned 
and Puckett asked: "Are you going to 
get me any heat when I come into work 
Monday morning?" The foreman failed 
to answer and Puckett then asked for a 
set of grievance papers, stating that the 
only way he could get heat was to file a 
grievance in accordance with the con- 
tract. 

The foreman asked if this was a 
"threat," came back shortly thereafter 
and Puckett was fired. 

The Trial Examiner decided that the 
firing was based on Puckett's insubordina- 
tion and therefore was legal. The NLRB 
panel of three, which heard the case, dis- 
agreed. It noted that Puckett had not been 
fired immediately after he had refused 
to put out the fire or fetch a portable 
heater, but that he had been discharged 
only after he had said that he would file 
a grievance. 

The foreman's question: "It that a di- 
rect threat to me?" showed "that the 
motivating reason for the discharge was 
Puckett's exercise of a right written into 
the contract" — namely the filing of a 
grievance. 

The Board, therefore, ordered the com- 
pany to cease and desist from "discourag- 
ing activity having for its purpose the 
submission, presentation and processing 
of grievances pursuant to the terms of a 
collective bargaining agreement." It fur- 
ther ordered the company to reinstate 
Puckett and reimburse him for any loss 
he may have suffered. 

Members of the Panel were Chairman 
Frank McCulloch and Members John H. 
Fanning and Gerald A. Brown. (PAL) 



28 



THE CARPENTER 




KNEELING, FROM LEFT: John Williamson, Local 541, Washington, Pa.; Michael Cunningham, Local 833, Philadelphia, 
Pa.; Norman Leininger, Local 287, Harrisburg, Pa.; and Harvey Raffensberger, Local 191, York, Pa., all carpentry contest- 
ants; Wayne Givens, Local 2235, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Dennis Whitehead, Local 2235, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Richard Linkenheimer, Local 
2235, Pittsburgh, Pa.; 

STANDING, FROM LEFT: Martin Durkin, apprentice coordinator, Philadelphia Joint Apprenticeship Committee; Howard 
Pfeifer, co-chairman, Apprentice Contest Committee; William T. Unitas, educational coordinator of Western Pennsylvania Carp. 
DC; John Garlick, carpentry judge; E. Pawlowicz, carpentry judge; Harry W. Hersbey, carpentry judge; R. R. Bickel, mill- 
wright judge; M. B. Cramer, millwright judge; F. J. Tuccy, millwright judge; and W. Veith, millwright instructor, Pittsburgh. 

Pennsylvania Selects Winners For International Contest 



The second Annual State Contest was 
held in Hershey, Pennsylvania, on April 
11 and 12. Nine contestants competed 
in all three divisions of the contest; Car- 
penters — John Williamson. L.U. 541, 
Washington; Michael Cunningham, L.U. 
833, Philadelphia; Norman Leininger, 
L.U. 287, Harrisburg. and Harvey Raf- 
fensberger. L.U. 191, York; Mill and 
Cabinet — John Banaszewski. L.U. 1160, 
Pittsburgh and Jay Hableton. L.U. 359, 
Philadelphia; Millwrights — Wayne Giv- 
ens, Dennis Whitehead and Richard 
Linkenheimer, all from Millwright L.U. 
2235, Pittsburgh. 

The contestants, working under the 
watchful eye of the three judges (assigned 



to each subdivision of the contest), put 
on a display of skill which was a pleas- 
ure to view. Many delegates attending the 
Educational Forum, invited management 
representatives, and others viewed the 
contestants at work during their 8-hour 
manipulative project. 

The contestants and their ladies were 
honored at an awards dinner attended 
by approximately 70 labor, management 
and government representatives. Contest 
Committee Co-Chairman George Walish 
and Howard Pfeifer expressed the Com- 
mittee's thanks to all the participants. 
Warren B. Grimm, secretary of the Penn- 
sylvania State Council, participated in 
the awards presentation. All contestants 



received attractive plaques and Cer- 
tificates of Participation. George M. 
Sehmeltzer, Executive Director. Keystone 
Building Contractors Association, pre- 
sented attractive photo portfolios to all 
contestants. 

The winners who will represent Penn- 
sylvania are: Michael Cunningham. Phil- 
adelphia Carpenter; Jay Hambleton, 
Philadelphia Mill and Cabinet, and 
Wayne Givens, Pittsburgh Millwright. 
They each received $500 Saving Bonds 
and tools in addition to their all-expense 
paid trip to the 1969 Carpenter's Inter- 
national Apprentice Contest to be held in 
Chicago. 




Jay Hambleton of Local 359, Phila- 
delphia, mill-cabinet winner, with Rob- 
ert D. Krchling, J. B. Archer, and 
Ralph H. Edwards, mill-cabinet judges. 



Michael Cunningham of Local 833. 
Philadelphia (kneeling), with E. Pawlo- 
wicz. Harr> W. Hershey, and John Gar- 
lick, carpentry judges. 



Wayne Givens of Local 2235, Pitts- 
burgh, millwright winner, with M. B. 
Cramer, R. R. Bickel, and F. J. Tuccy, 

millwright judges. 



JUNE, 1969 



29 




FRONT ROW: John F. Hurley, winner, carpentry; James W. Cole, honorable mention, carpentry; Carlos H. E. Bisanabi, sec- 
ond place, carpentry; John H. Lapinski, third place, carpentry; Nicholas R. Loope, director, Joint Carpentry Apprentice- 
ship Committee of Washington, D.C. and Vicinity; Ralph Corley, Jr. second place, mill-cabinet; Edwin L. Henley, third place, 
mill-cabinet; George W. Weaver, second place, millwright; Ronald L. Corder, winner, mill-cabinet; and Samuel H. Hill, winner, 
millwright. 

CENTER ROW: Leo Gable, Technical Director, Education and Training, United Brotherhood; Edw. LaCovey, Jr., Director, 
Apprenticeship Information Center, U.S. Department of Labor; Maurice Fenton, Acting Director, D.C. Apprenticeship Council; 
L. M. Rice, Jr., Chairman, Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship Committee of Washington, D.C. and Vicinity and Vice President, 
Wm. P. Lipscomb Co., Inc.; Ben A. Sanford, Secretary, J.C.A.C. Contest Committee and Business Representative of the Car- 
penters District Council; James S. Merkle, Member, J.C.A.C, and Business Representative of Carpenters District Council; J. 
W. Brown, Chairman, Special Events Committee, Iverson Mall Shopping Center; Francis X. Martin, Chairman of the J.C.A.C. 
Contest Committee and Vice President, Geo. C. Martin Company, Inc. 

BACK ROW: Joe Miller, Director, Manpower Training, National Association of Home Builders; Contest Judge H. Leslie 
Simmons, AIA, McLeod, Ferrera & Ensing, Architects; Contest Judge Hollis J. Stevens, Jr., Architect, Hugh Newell Jacobsen, 
AIA; J. Harshaw, Coordinating Judge, United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America; Contest Judge William Wal- 
lace, Jr., Vice-President, Lamar and Wallace, Inc.; Contest Judge Joseph Honeychuck Assistant Principal, Bell Evening School; 
Alfred F. Yates, Apprenticeship Representative, D.C. Apprenticeship Council; Contest Judge Edward Reller, Superintendent, 
Millwright Installations; Contest Judge James L. Saunders, President, James L. Saunders Company; Contest Judge James A. 
Rolls, Project Manager, Win. P. Lipscomb Company, Inc.; Contest Judge Robert Gottlied, Superintendent, James G. Davis 
Construction Corp.; and Contest Judge Robert E. Carpenter, Consulting Engineer, Weller and Scott, Consulting Engineers. 

Apprentices Compete in D.C. and Vicinity Contests 



The Second National Capital Area 
Carpentry Apprenticeship Contest, a 
preliminary to the International Contest, 
was recently sponsored by the Carpen- 
ters District Council of Washington, D.C. 
and Vicinity, the Master Builders Asso- 
ciation. Inc. (D.C. Chapter of the Associ- 
ated General Contractors of America), 
and the Area Construction Contractors 
Council. The contest was divided into 
three categories in which John Hurley 
won the first place award for carpentry; 
Ronald Corder won for cabinetmaking; 
and Samuel Hill was adjudged the best 
millwright entered in the competition. 
The prizes for each of the top winners 
includes an all-expenses-paid trip to Chi- 
cago, Illinois to compete in the Interna- 
tional Contest on August 14, 15, and 
16, 1969. 

Francis X. Martin, Vice-President of 
George C. Martin, Inc., and Chairman 
of the Contest Committee directed the 
contest. Others on the committee in- 
cluded Everett Lank, President of Lank 
Woodwork Company; Warren Jordan, 
Member of the Carpenters District Coun- 
cil of Washington, D.C, and Ben San- 
ford, Business Representative, Carpenters 



District Council of D.C. and Vicinity. 
At the conclusion L. M. Rice, Jr., 
Vice-President of William P. Lipscomb 
Company. Inc. and Chairman of the 
Joint Carpentry Apprenticeship Commit- 
tee of Washington, D.C. and Vicinity 
awarded $50 cash prizes each on behalf 



of the Master Builders Association and 
The Construction Contractors Council. 
Again this year Mr. A. A. Carozza, the 
owner and builder of Iverson Mall con- 
tributed a $25 cash prize to each of the 
three first place winners. The annual 
contests are held at Iverson Mall. 



TOOL TALK 



By George R. Jones 





"But, Grandma, I didn't mean you weren't sharp that way!" 



30 



THE CARPENTER 




mM 



Z'n 



\Z 




D 



Send In Your Favorites! Mail To: Plane Gossip, 101 Constitution 
Avenue, N.W., Washington. D. C. 20001. SORRY, NO PAYMENT. 



Doggone Good Story 

The Arab and the Israeli were pa- 
trolling opposite each other. The Arab 
had a huge German shepherd with 
him while the Israeli had a peculiar 
greenish-looking little dog. Every time 
they would pass, they would cuss each 
other out with vile oaths. Finally they 
decided that, rather than fight them- 
selves, they would pit their dogs 
against one another. The Arab was 
certain his huge shepherd would make 
short work of the little Israeli pup. 

The dogs were loosed at each other 
and, in a brief flurry of sand, the tiny 
Israeli pooch had torn the big Arab 
dog to ribbons. 

"I can't believe it!" cried the Arab. 
"What kind of a dog is that?" 

The Israeli grinned and said: "Be- 
fore I had his nose fixed, he was an 
alligator!" 




aire, secondly to an actor, thirdly to 
a minister and, finally, to an under- 
taker. She said it was a case of "One 
for the money, two for the show, three 
to make ready and four to go!" — 
John Freeman, L.U. 22. 






lick— c;i\ 




Never a Bargain! 

The Internal Revenue agent was 
patiently trying to explain casualty 
loss conditions to a taxpayer. Finally 
he said: "So what was the fair market 
value of your home immediately be- 
fore the casualty?" 

"Nothing!" shot back the taxpayer. 
"Who would buy a house right in the 
path of a hurricane?" 



Really Being Prepared 

The Hollywood actress had been 
married four times; first to a million- 



Professional Courtesy 

A doctor and his wife were enter- 
ing a restaurant when a gaudily- 
painted, mini-skirted floozy tossed 
the medic a bright "Hello!" 

"Who was that?" demanded the 
wife. 

"Oh, just a young woman I know 
professionally," he replied. 

"That I'm certain of," replied the 
wife. "But whose?" 

Deathly Healthy 

"This is the healthiest town in the 
world," bragged the oldtimer. 

"That's strange," replied a visiting 
friend. "I just saw a funeral going to 
the cemetery." 

"Yep!" replied the oldester, "that 
was our undertaker. Poor fellow 
starved to death!" — Robert Keeny, 
Butler, Mo. 

Real Hairy Story 

Many years ago, when a boy liked 
a girl very much, he would let her 
wear his class ring. Now things are 
changed; he lets her use his curlers. 



This Month's Limerick 

A clever young man from West 

Wheeling 
Was possessed of such comical feel- 
ing 
That when he read on the door, 
"Don't spit on the floor" 
He took a devilish shot at the ceiling. 



The Acid Tesf 

If any wiseacre ever tells you 
"Nothing is impossible!" ask him if 
he has ever tried to get his name off 
a mailing list. 




A Muscat Ramble 

The customer found a fly in his 
soup. Calling the waiter, he de- 
manded: "What is that fly doing in 
my soup?" 

The waiter peered earnestly at the 
bowl for a minute, then said: "I'd 
guess it is a bit of a backstroke, sir!" 

Hard fo Make! 

The crapshooter at Las Vegas rat- 
tled the dice noisily, then rolled them 
out. They came to rest on I I and he 
was about to pick up his winnings 
when a third one dropped out of his 
sleeve and came up a six. The dealer 
just picked up the third cube, put it in 
his pocket and said: "Okay, fella . . . 
roll again. Your point is 17!" 



Year's To you.' 

The easiest way we know of to get 
a youthful figure is to ask a woman 
her age. 



JUNE, 1969 



31 




Service to the 
Brotherhood 




A gallery of pictures showing some of 
the senior members of the Brotherhood 
who recently received 25-year or 50- 
year service pins. 

(1) DETROIT, MICH.— Local 337 hon- 
ored its oldest member, agewise, Tim 
O'Meara, at an impromptu birthday party 
held at Finlay C. Allan Hall in Warren 
when he turned 94 years of age on St. 
Valentine's Day, February 14. Brother 
O'Meara retired from the carpentry trade 
more than 25 years ago and was origi- 
nally affiliated with Local 335 in Grand 
Rapids. His membership in the brother- 
hood exceeds 50 years. 

Members and officers of Local 337 who 
attended the celebration to honor Brother 
O'Meara are, seated, left to right: John 
McEwen; James Waddell; guest of honor 
Tim O'Meara; Sophus Martinsen; and 
Danny Johnston, a 25-year member who 
escorted Brother O'Meara to and from 
the affair. Standing, left to right: Joseph 
Miller, business representative; George 
McDonald, business representative, De- 
troit District Council; John Harrington, 
secretary-treasurer, Detroit District Coun- 
cil; William "Bill" Powers, business man- 
ager; Oscar Nelson; and Arthur Jackson. 

(2) WEST NEWTON, MASS.— Having 
completed 25 years of active service in 
the Brotherhood, Nicholas Vitale of Lo- 
cal 708 was recently awarded his mem- 
bership pin by James Chandler, president. 





(3) ST. LOUIS, MO.— Local 2119 (Pile- 
drivers, Wharf and Dock Builders) re- 
cently celebrated its Golden Anniversary 
as a union. The birthday party included 
speeches and the presentation of service 
pins to veteran members ranging from 25 
years to more than 46 years of member- 
ship in the local. 



Officers and pin recipients, front row, 
left to right, are: Otto Brockmeier, 46 
years; Ronald Rice, Local 2119 president, 
43 years; Walter Webb, financial secre- 
tary, 42 years; Leo C. Parker, 34 years; 
Chester Bailey, 34 years; Herman Henke, 
District Council business representative, 

33 years; Vincent Werner, 32 years; Hugh 
W. Stretz, 32 years; William E. Marx, 32 
years; and S. E. Taylor, 31 years. Second 
row, left to right: Matt Jirauch, 28 years; 
Jesse Schroll, 27 years; Floyd T. Thorn- 
ton, 26 years; William J. Kostedt, 25 
years; Herbert Brokaw, treasurer; John 
"Bill" Brokaw, vice president; Clifford 
Clifton, warden; William E. Reed, re- 
cording secretary; Tom Rimert, conduc- 
tor; and Thayer Ampleman, William A. 
Webb and Cliff Abernathy, trustees. 

Other members honored but not pic- 
tured are: Harvey Jacobs, 25 years; Car- 
inello Migneco, 26 years; Jackson Seitz, 
26 years; Walter R. Bench, 28 years; 
Frank Kamarit, 28 years; Clyde Duncan, 

34 years; Dell I luxhold, 43 years; Robert 
Taylor, 44 years; and James J. Sneed, 
46 years. Membership pins were for- 
warded to eligible members who were 
unable to attend the affair. 

Ollie Langhorst, District Council ex- 
ecutive secretary, was guest speaker for 
the occasion. 




32 



THE CARPENTER 



(4) SCRANTON, PA.— At a dinner- 
dance sponsored by Local 261 at the 
Jermyn Motor Inn in Scranton late last 
year, brothers who have been continuous 
members for at least 25 years were hon- 
ored and presented with service pins. 

Officers and members receiving awards 
are pictured, front row, left to right: 
Joseph Bartell, business representative; 
Henry Skibinski; John Hildebrand, 
trustee; James Vaughn, president; Ray- 
mond Joyce; and Stephen Bilock. Back 
row, left to right: Patrick Ginry; Joseph 
Zebrowski, international representative; 
Raleigh Rajoppi. executive board mem- 
ber; Raymond Ginnetti, international rep- 
resentative; Martin Richards; and An- 
thony Wysocki. 

(5) INGLEWOOD, CALIF. — A pin 

presentation was held recentlj honoring 
members of Local 2435 who have been 
affiliated with the union for 25 years or 
more. 

Members who received pins in recog- 
nition of 50 years of service were Albert 
Johnson and Rommie Urban. Omer J. 
Schroeder and O. Andy Stromme were 
recognized for having completed 45 years. 

(5A) Recipients of 35 and 40-year service 
pins were, front row, left to right: John 
H. McClintock; Joe Verman; Jacob Dor- 
mann; Elmer J. Taylor; Joseph L. Mag- 
nuson and Albin S. Mardall. Back row, 
left to right: Ham Dawson, Frank King, 
Russell Auten, and Robert B. Clubb. 




(5B) Members of Local 2435 awarded 
pins for 25 and 30-years of continuous 
service are pictured, front row, left to 
right: Donald VV. Osborne, Paul Turtle, 
O. L. King, Leo Bearden, Oscar Rogers, 
George Dobbins, and Edward T. Zeimet. 
Second row, left to right: Robert B. 
Clubb, Frank King, John McClintock, 
Melvin Hanke, Watson A. Reed, Harold 
S. Ready, Joseph J. Halwax, Dan Grant, 
Karl Kristenson, Joseph G. Collin, Ches- 
ter Brown, H. L. Raasch, and guest Harry 
Dawson. Back row, left to right: Levi 
Parker, Ed J. Bergschneider, Leonard D. 
Johnson, Herman Streur, Clarence Steger, 
Celestino Muinos, Russell McLoud, Phil- 
lip McCIendon, Donald Buhrman, Bruno 
Maas, N. J. Newman, Arvid Wick, LeRoy 
McCombs, Robert G. James, Robert 
Pluym, and guest Russell Auten. 



Many members, wives, and friends 
attended this affair, and some of the dis- 
tinguished guests included: Robert B. 
Clubb, president and business represent- 
ative of Local 2435, who made the intro- 
ductions; William Baker, financial secre- 
tary of Local 929, who read the invoca- 
tion; Ham Dawson, president of the Los 
Angeles District Council; Paul Miller, 
business representative of the Los Angeles 
District Council; Pat McDonald, business 
representative of the Los Angeles District 
Council; Thurm Sanford, business repre- 
sentative of Local 929; George Reid, busi- 
ness representative of Local 1400; Rus- 
sell Auten, administrative secretary of the 
Los Angeles District Council, who pre- 
sented eligible members with service pins; 
and Frank King, former business repre- 
sentative of Local 2435. 






(6) JANESVILLE, WIS.— At a regular 
meeting of Local 836, two senior mem- 
bers were recently awarded gold 50-year 
membership pins. Harry Smith, on the 
left, was initiated in 1917, and Charles 
Northey, right, was initiated in 1905. We 
are proud of these members who have 
been dedicated in serving the Brother- 
hood over the past years. 

(6A) — Active 25-year members were also 
honored with pins at the meeting of Local 
836, from left to right: Romaine Anesey 
(1935); Ted Kalstad (1942); Gordon 



6A 

Ehrke (1940); Don Samuelson (1941); 
Aaron Breitkreutz (1937); Karl Korsmo 
(1939); John Dunning (1942); and Vince 
McCarville (1940). 

Members unable to attend the cere- 
monies to accept pins included: Harlan 
Beatty (1925); Melvin Christenson (1941); 
Leonard Fishman (1940); Werner Gosch 
(1942); Joe Haberl (1941); Virgil John- 
son (1941); Harold Lang (1942); Elmer 
Matson (1940); Alfred Mork (1941); 
Gerald Scott (1939); and Fred Smith 
(1927). 




(7) HOT SPRINGS, ARK.— Ten mem- 
bers of Local 891 were recently honored 
at a pin presentation ceremony. Senior 
members, seated, left to right, are: Tom 
Harmon, 25 years; Charles W. Mowery, 
51 years; D. E. Broadhead, 26 years; and 
Vernon H. Culliver, 26 years. Second 
row, standing, left to right: J. L. Hum- 
phreys, 26 years; C. H. Ussery, 26 years; 
R. C. Ketteringham, 26 years; and Clark 
Runyan, 26 years. Back row, left to right: 
Garland Milholen, 26 years; Goldie L. 
Golden, 26 years; and Rural C. Bain, 
26 years. 

Brothers unable to attend the cere- 
monies to accept their awards included: 
D. H. Byrd, 26 years; V. H. Harris, 28 
years; D. H. Pierce, 25 years; and Lloyd 
Thompson, 25 years. 

(8) EL DORADO, ARK.— Seventeen 
members of Local 1683 and their guests 
attended a pin presentation dinner to 
honor members who have completed 25 
and 30 years of active service. 

Shown in the picture, seated, left to 
right, are: D. E. Henderson, C. H. Pick- 
ering, E. A. Hines, Coy Ellis, C. H. Free- 
man, W. E. Roberson, Q. E. Ethridge, 
and J. O. Taylor. Back row, left to right: 
Frederick N. Bull, B. F. Hannegan, J. C. 
Lewis, T. A. Davis, C. B. Perdue, J. K. 
Bass, I. T. Strickland, W. P. Mitcham, 
Frank Nichols, and E. E. Stanley. 

Frederick N. Bull, General Executive 
Board Member, 6th District, presented 
pins to the brothers. 




34 



THE CARPENTER 




(9) HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA— Thir- 
teen members of Local 1405 were pre- 
sented with 25-year service pins at their 
recent 26th Anniversary celebration. 

Pin recipients, seated, left to right: 
Leo Legere; Frederick Nickerson; Duncan 
Cameron; Albert LaLonde, International 
Representative; Clarence Engram; Patrick 
Tardiff; and Clarence MacFarlane. Sec- 
ond row, standing, left to right: Adolph 
D'Entremont; Samuel Rhodenizer; Mal- 
colm MacDonald; Religh Swinimer; 
Leslie Brown, president. Federal Dock- 
yards Trades and Labour Council; and 
Bernard Dixon, president of Local 1405. 

Members of Local 1405 who were eligi- 
ble to receive 25-year pins, but unable to 
attend the ceremonies, were Joseph 
Heisler, Joseph Lyons, Robbie Brooks, 
Charles Paynter, Abe Oats, Clifford 
Nauss, Crandell Moser, Morris Doucette, 
and H. L. Macintosh. 

(10) KENTON, WASH. — Local 1797 
recently held a 25-year pin presentation 
for 10 members deserving this honor. 
Front row, left to right: Arville M. Twidt, 
Carl F. Fredlund, Ralph L. Lund, Ben 
Kalk, and LuVerne D. Koesrner. Back 
row, left to right: Charles A. Nelson, 




George Heiser, Robert G. LeClerc, James 
Croston, and Frank J. Snjder. 

Members of Local 1797 who were 
eligible to receive 25-year pins, but un- 
able to attend the ceremonies, were 
Joseph Bunker, Charles O. Baze, Clyde 
Spooner, Paul H. Cato, Seth Abramson, 
Gene Swanson, Edward A. Gallez, C. E. 
Miles, Parnell H. Grina, Lawrence Gerke. 
Joseph T. Hughey, Ewald Haiiman, 



Yolney F. Earlywine, and Deo V. 
Hudgins. 

(11) SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.— 
Twenty-five year membership pins were 
presented to members of the Pile Drivers, 
Bridge, Wharf and Dock Builders Local 
34 at its annual oldtimers' luncheon held 
at Carpenters Hall. An enjoyable time 
was had bv all who attended the affair. 




JUNE, 1969 



35 




MARKING DEVICE 



motion manager, said the new edition lists 
fire and STC (sound transmission class) 
ratings for wood and steel framing as- 
semblies. 

Diagrams illustrate construction details 
using gypsum Firestop wallboard and Va- 
inch gypsum sound deadening board. 

STC ratings as high as 55 can be 
achieved with the incombustible W-inch 
sound deadening board in combination 
with other standard building materials. 

To assist architects and general con- 
tractors as well as drywall applicators, 
the brochure lists sound and fire ratings, 
material details and application methods 
for each type of assembly. 

The new "Sounds Great" brochure is 
free to professionals by writing to R. E. 
Perdew, inquiry manager, Georgia-Pacific 
Corp., Box 311, Portland, Oregon 97207. 



SERRATED NAILS 




Available from Timber Engineering 
Company (TECO) is a precision marking 
tool that makes it possible for the user to 
automatically determine 8", 12", 16" and 
24" o.c. settings of studs, rafters, roof 
trusses, and other building components. 
Called the "TECO Mark 16", the device 
eliminates making "cutting" and "locat- 
ing" marks on lumber. While a proven 
time and labor saver, the product's prin- 
cipal advantage is that is provides greater 
accuracy in the layout of building parts 
and pieces. 

The "TECO Mark 16" consists of a 
special "marking wheel" mounted on a 
chassis which is rolled along the material 
to be marked. Although the basic unit is 
designed to mark at 16" centers, addi- 
tional marker inserts are available for 
other settings in modules of 4". Ruggedly 
constructed of a solid aluminum body 
with the "marking wheel" made of steel, 
the "Mark 16" is equipped with a heavy 
duty inking roller that automatically inks 
the marking element. The product works 
equally well on wood, steel or concrete. 

Information on the "TECO Mark 16" 
can be obtained by writing Timber Engi- 
neering Company. 1619 Massachusetts 
Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20036. 

DRYWALL SOUND CONTROL 

An expanded 1969 edition of "Sounds 
Great," a brochure detailing tested wall 
and floor assemblies with built-in noise 
control as well as fire ratings, has been 
published by the Georgia-Pacific Corp. 
gypsum division for the construction in- 
dustry. 

G. S. Nelson, G-P's gypsum sales pro- 



The unique design of a new screw- 
driver's handle enables the user to work 
longer without hand-cramping fatigue 
and to exert more "muscle" on those last, 
tight turns of the screw. 

The Stanley "Workmaster" screwdriver 
handle — made of smoky, translucent 
plastic — has three fluted sides shaped to 
fit the triangular "pocket" formed by the 
hand when it grips a handle. This fits- 
the-fist shape is more comfortable to hold 
and less tiring to work with than the 
standard round handle of other drivers. 
And it enables the average user to exert 
a surprising torque, or twist, on hard-to- 
drive or hard-to-loosen screws. 

The "Workmaster" line in a total of 
16 sizes includes four basic types of 
driver: standard, square-bar, cabinet and 
Phillips. All have high-strength alloy 
steel bars, finely polished and lacquered. 
Blade tips are precision cross-ground. 

Available at hardware and building 
supply stores. Dept. PID, Stanley Tools, 
division of The Stanley Works, New 
Britain, Conn. 06050. 





The Scotch nail, produced by Beth- 
lehem Steel Corporation, is saving build- 
ers and prefabricators money in material 
according to users on a job site in Ore- 
field, Pa. 

The Scotch nail has 50 percent more 
holding power than regular round nails, 
the manufacturer claims. 

Scotch nails have angled serrations 
along their square shanks. Because of 
this design, substantially more holding 
mon nails. The barbed surfaces grip the 
wood fibers, while the square shank cuts 
through the wood, rather than wedging 
the fibers apart. Thus, Scotch nails can- 
not rotate loose. 

Rough-framing joints, molding and 
stairwells nailed together with round- 
shank nails can work loose because of 
normal vibration and movement. But 
the increased holding power of Scotch 
nails makes such fittings tight to reduce 
the frequency of callbacks for renailing. 

Use of this nail also reduces wood 
splitting. The square shank cuts throught 
the wood instead of forcing the grain 
apart, a frequent cause of splitting. Thus, 
less lumber is wasted and the cost of 
labor for replacing split boards is 
reduced. 

The nails are manufactured in a wide 
variety of types and sizes. 











do your mm 

FOR FREEDOM 






Invest in 

U.S. SAVINGS BONDS, 

FREEDOM SHARES 





The triangular "pocket" formed by the 
hand when it grips a handle, as inter- 
preted by Stanley. 



INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 

Audel, Theodore 23 

Chicago Technical College . . 25 

Craftsman Book Company ... 22 

Eliason Stair Gauge Co 22 

Est wing Manufacturing 18 

Foley Manufacturing 3-8 

Fugitt, Douglas 23 

Hydrolevel 22 

Irwin Auger Bit Co 21 

Locksmithing Institute 21 

Paneling Specialties Co 22 

Wen Products Inc 39 



36 



THE CARPENTER 




IN MEMOR1AM 



L.U. NO. 15, 
HACKENSACK, N.J. 

Manner, Joseph E. 
Putignano, Anthony 
Rossner, Clinton B. 

L.U. NO. 31, 
TRENTON, NJ. 

Paterson, Thomas 
Rumery, Harry E. 
Warne, Aaron 

L.U. NO. 33, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Anastasio, Felice 
Barnes, Chester 
Capaldo, James 
Costa, Antonio 
Prendergast, Alfred 

L.U. NO. 48, 
FITCHBURG, MASS. 

Brousseau, Arcade 
Uusitalo, Matti 

L.U. NO. 50, 
KNOXVILLE, TENN. 

Whittle, Ernest H. 

L.U. NO. 54, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Fiala, James 
Placko, Samuel 

L.U. NO. 62, 
ENGLEWOOD, ILL. 

Carlson, Gust A. 
Johnson, Helge 
McGregor, Edward 
Nystedt, Oscar C. 
Oliphant, Howard 
Pearson, Herman 
Tecza, Henry 
Wickdahl, Hjalmar 
Young, Eric 

L.U. NO. 64, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Blandford, J. B. 
Burke, M. L. 
Pope. Tom H. 
Schnyder, John 

L.U. NO. 101, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 

Dauber, William E. 
Haag, Emery F. 
Sabat, Victor J. 

L.U. NO. 106, 

I>ES MOINES, IOWA 

Jennings, Emmelt 
Schrupp, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 132, 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 

Cherry, Benjamin W. 
Coberly, Artho B. 
Rasmussen, Nels P. 
White. W. W. 



L.U. NO. 135, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Borer, Sam 
Carlson, Ted 
Fried. Herman 
Mimiles, Isidore 
Mimzer, Max 
Siegelaub, Hyman 
Steifman, Barney 
Tinaro. Frank 
Weiner, Harry 
Yellin, Philip 

L.U. NO. 166, 
ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

Hokanson. Arnold 
Houston, Theodore 

L.U. NO. 169, 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. 

Campbell, William Newton 
Williams. Asa 
Wood, Charles E. 



L.U. NO. 174, 
IOLIET, ILL. 

Bourne. Ernest 

L.U. NO. 181, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Jensen. Eigil 

L.U. NO. 198, 
DALLAS, TEX. 

Howard. H. H. 



L.U. NO. 218, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

Collins. Joseph 
Duncan. George 
Kirby. Eli Cecil 
Leard, Charles M. 
Leard, George V. 

L.U. NO. 226, 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Gearhart, Samuel 
Monroe, Charles W. 
Van Bramer, H. J. 

L.U. NO. 230, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Noble, Guy 
Sternot, Edward 

L.U. NO. 246, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Russ, Max 

L.U. NO. 253, 
OMAHA, NEBR. 

Bayer, Wilfred 
Bojanski, John 
Blown, Harold 
Bumgardner, Roy 
Burkamp, Albert 
Carlson. Gust G. 
Coleman, Leo 
Grant. Ray 
Matulevicz, Joseph 
Nodgaard, S. J. 



L.U. NO. 264, 
MILWAUKEE, VVISC. 

Detjen, Walter 
Ewick, Andrew 
Findling. Philip 
Laack, George 
Magdefrau, John 
Mahringer, Erich 
Melzer, Arthur 
Stuessy, Edward 

L.U. NO. 281, 
BINGHAMPTON, N.Y. 

Cassell, George P. 
Hawley, Edward A., Sr. 

L.U. NO. 283. 
AUGUSTA, GA. 

Bruce, Robert Warren 
Hambrick, Paul 
Hughes, Leon (Beagle) 
West, Thomas C. 

L.U. NO. 301, 
NEWBURGH, N.Y. 

McFadyen, William M. 

L.U. NO. 308, 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 

Hartl. Edward 

L.U. NO. 314, 
MADISON, WISC. 

Altenberg, Arthur 
Burke, Carlton 
Greene, F. A. 
Harbort, Eugene 
Hillestad, Jacob 
Hungerford. Earl 
Moen, Wayne 
Pongratz, Ralph 
Ratell, Jesse 
Storrs, George 

L.U. NO. 322, 
NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y. 

Bates, Ernest 
Gregorski. Henry 

L.U. NO. 331, 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Mustin, William E. 



L.U. NO. 366, 

NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Romer, Malthiu 



Danks, Frank 
Rolling, Louis 
Tall. Edwin 

L.U. NO. 559, 
PADUCAH, KY. 

Bryan, Fred H. 
Miles, Walter L. 

L.U. NO. 610, 

PORT ARTHUR, TEX. 

Anderson, A. M. 
Latham, Willie J. 
Moore, R. J. 
Sibert. C. M. 
Sinclair. Calvin P. 
White, Carl W. 

L.U. NO. 627, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Holcomb. Alex S. 
Sweetland, E. G. 

L.U. NO. 657, 
SHEBOYGAN, WISC. 

Rammer, Rudolph 
Wachter, Jessie 

L.U. NO. 665. 
AMARILLO, TEX. 

Collins. V. P. 
Lewis. Lum C. 

L.U. NO. 690, 
LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 

Allen, Elmer E. 
Cheshier, Floyd P. 
Jones. Lester 
Rogers, M. G. (Mack) 
Teal, Paul 

L.U. NO. 770, 
YAKIMA, WASH. 

Glenn, Stuart 

L.U. NO. 848. 

SAN BRUNO, CALIF. 

Gustafson, Ralph 

L.U. NO. 854. 
MAD1SONVILLE, OHIO 

Bailey. H. Gordon 
Keune. Henry L. 



L.U. NO. 453, 
AUBURN. N.Y. 

Heath, Roger 

L.U. NO. 470, 
TACOMA, WASH. 

Christensen, Ludvig 
Colbo, Barry E. 
Thallhimer, John 

L.U. NO. 486. 
BAYONNE, NJ. 

Buttner, George 
Capriola, Alexander 



I..U. NO. 943. 
TULSA, OKLA. 

Bates, Claude 
Bryant, P. L. 

Ingle. George 
Jackson, G. A. 

L.U. NO. 956, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 

Tolkko. Yaino 

L.U. NO. 982. 
DETROIT. MICH. 

Belham, Sherman R. 



L.U. 1093. 

GLEN COVE, N.Y. 

Titus, George 

L.U. NO. 1128, 

LA GRANGE, ILL. 

Schultz, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 1138. 
TOLEDO, OHIO 

Joseph, Marvin 
LaFolIette, Ernest 
Taylor, Theodore 
St. Germain, Thomas 

L.U. NO. 1172, 
BILLINGS, MONT. 

Geiger, Pius 

L.U. NO. 1185. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Luttrull, David M. 
Swierski, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1273. 
EUGENE, ORE. 

Alliston. Robert E. 
Bowder, Arthur 
Davis, Clifford E. 
Fisher, Paul 
Kirkhart, Lyle 
Linville, Guy R. (Dick) 
Miller, Melvin 
Morrison, Charles 
Smith, Duane 

L.U. NO. 1335, 
WILMINGTON, CALIF. 

Arbuckle. William T. 
Argento, Frank 
Billings, Elmer L. 
Buchanan. Williard 
Chalker. George 
Cox, Alex 
Crawford, Ray 
Doty. Howard 
Fredickson. Alfred 
Halo. Jack 
Hartman, Irving 
Hawkes. Golden 
Jones, Davis N. 
Mendenhall, Earl 
Mitchell. John 
Phillips. William D. 
Rose, Harry 
Wilson, Thomas 

I I . NO. 1353 
SANTA FE. N. MEX. 

Sandoval. Adolfo 
Villa. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1365. 
CI.EVFI \M). OHIO 

Costa, Joseph 
Hoislbauer. Joseph 

L.U. NO. 1367. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

Brodkowicz. Thaddeus 

Continued on next pace 



JUNE, 1969 



37 



IN MEMORIAM 



(Continued from page 37) 

L.U. NO. 1371, 
GADSDEN, ALA. 

Steward, O. E. 



L.U. NO. 1373, 
FLINT, MICH. 

Thompson, Thomas A. 
Smeltzer, Owen 

L.U. NO. 1382, 
ROCHESTER, MINN. 

Hull, Ira B. 
McDowell, William L. 

L.U. NO. 1397, 

N. HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. 

Samsel, Walter 

L.U. NO. 1423, 
CORPUS CHRISTI, TEX. 

Hewitt, Archie M, (Whitie) 

L.U. NO. 1456, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Anderson, Sigvald 
Garvey, Leo 
Hedstrom, Walter 
Jensen, Charles 
Jensen, Thorleif 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, Mathias 
Lee, Jens 
Lisko, Emil 
Metzger, Daniel 
Mulvey, Thomas 



Nilsen, Cornelius 
Preyer, Percy 
Scarry, Timothy 
Schonhans, Theodore 
Svede, Arthur 

L.U. NO. 1497, 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 

Bergman, Marcus 
Dinwiddie, Charles 
Gibb, Clarence 
Goodenough, Leo A. 
Lang, Floyd 
Palmer, James A. 

L.U. NO. 1513, 
DETROIT, MICH. 

Sedorchuk, Annis 

L.U. NO. 1515, 
PENSACOLA, FLA. 

Hood, Richard C. 

L.U. NO. 1784, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Bruhman, Louis 
Kammerlander, Joseph 
Rosjer, Peter 

L.U. NO. 1822, 
FORT WORTH, TEX. 

Whitlock, Loyd 

L.U. NO. 1832, 
ESCANABA, MICH. 

Peterson, Lambert 



L.U. NO. 1846, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Boyer, Peter 
Hebert, Wilbur A. 

L.U. NO. 1849, 
PASCO, WASH. 

Bliss, Percy P. 
Dunn, Clifford J. 

L.U. NO. 2094, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

Busse, Car 

L.U. NO. 2133, 
ALBANY, ORE. 

Peterson, I. N. 

L.U. NO. 2163, 
NEW YORK, N.Y. 
Braughler, William 
Herz, Adolph 
Maguire, Thomas, Sr. 
Thistle, Fred H. 

L.U. NO. 2203, 
ANAHEIM, CALIF. 

Boettger, Ben 
Currie, Harold 
Payne, Norval C. 
Peterson, Jens, Jr. 
Pursley, Lorley V. 

L.U. NO. 2274, 
PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Field, Wayne S. 
McKnight, Robert 
Wright, Franklin 

L.U. NO. 2411, 
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 

Brown, Robert Asbury 



Though he's king of the beasts, he 
doesn't know where his next meal is 
coming from . . . 




You're better off, thanks to your 
union and your active participation 
in it. 



L.U. NO. 2436, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

Haas, John Fred, Jr. 



L.U. NO. 3182 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Johnson, Hans M. 



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38 



THE CARPENTER 



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Items of interest from the Brotherhood's 
retirement home at Lakeland, Florida. 



Lakeland Resident 
Is 75-Year Member 

William Hunting, a long-time resident 
of the Carpenters' Home for senior mem- 
bers at Lakeland. Fla., marked 75 years 
of membership in the Brotherhood, last 
February 18. 

Born in Germany on January 17, 1875, 
he came to the United States at an early 
age and lived in Chicago for many years. 
In 1892 he moved to St. Louis, soon join- 
ing the carpentry craft. He remembers 
working on Union Station in St. Louis 
for 350 an hour. 

Though he retired from active work 
29 years ago. he still moves well with 
the aid of a cane at the Lakeland Home. 

Seven Neiv Residents, 
Six Recent Deaths 

Elmer Yunnila, Local 1433, Detroit, 
Michigan, arrived at the Home April 15, 
1969. 

Erick E. Carlson, Local 58, Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home April 21, 1969. 

Gust George Wolff. Local 58. Chicago, 
111., arrived at the Home April 21, 1969. 

Eskil J. Lindblade, Local 62, Chicago. 
111., arrived at the Home April 22. 1969. 

William S. Quinn, Local 12, Syracuse, 
N. Y., arrived at the Home April 23, 
1969. 

George Weidman. Local 1473. Oak- 
land, California, arrived at the Home 
April 24. 1969. 

Nels G. Anderson. Local 951, Brain- 
erd, Minn., arrived at the Home April 
30, 1969. 

Ben Johnson, Local 946, Los Angeles. 
California, died in the Florida State Hos- 
pital. Chattahoochee, Florida. April 4. 
1969. He was buried in the Home Cem- 
etery. 

Charles Monroe, Local 413, South 
Bend, Ind.. died April 12, 1969. He was 
buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Glen J. Dennison, Local 639. Akron. 
Ohio, died April 15, 1969. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 

Charles Benson. Local 141, Chicago, 



111., died April 19. 1969. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 

Charles Jacobsen, Local 1134. Mt. 
Kisco. N. Y., died April 26, 1969. He 
was buried in the Home Cemetery. 

Berry Bellamy. Local 599, Hammond. 
Ind.. died April 29. 1969. He was buried 
in the Home Cemetery. 

Fred Thelin, Local 769, Pasadena, 
Calif., withdrew from the Home April 
7, 1969. 

Charlie Clemons. Local 109. Sheffield. 
Ala., withdrew from the Home April 22, 
1969. 

EDITORS NOTE: We have discontin- 
ued the listing of visitors to Lakeland, 
because of space limitations in the mag- 
azine. 



Which Are Yon? 

Are you an active member. 
The kind that would be missed, 
Or are you just contented that, 
Your name is on the list? 

Do you attend the meetings, 
And mingle with the flock, 
Or do you stay at home. 
And criticize and knock? 

Do you take an active part, 
To help the work along. 
Or are you satisfied. 
To say you just belong? 

Do you ever visit. 

A member who is sick. 

Or leave the work to just a few, 

And talk about the clique? 

There's quite a program scheduled, 
That I'm sure you've heard about, 
And we'll appreciate it if you too, 
Will come and help us out, 

So let's be up and doing. 
Now's the time to start, 
Don't just be a member. 
But take and active part. 

Think this over, member. 
You know right from wrong; 
Are you an active member. 
Or do you just belong? 

Submitted by Don Scharf Jr., 
Local 1024, 
Cumberland, Md. 



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39 



M. A. HUTCHESON, General President 




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Organized Labor Able to Give the SDS Its Comeuppance 



■ Students for a Democratic Society is an or- 
ganization which is neither democratic nor made 
up solely of students. It is responsible for much — 
if not all — of the turmoil which has virtually 
wrecked many fine American universities this year. 

If it has any program other than to wreck the 
American society, it has kept that program a deep, 
dark secret. 

Now SDS is turning its attention to the labor 
movement. SDS members are being urged to find 
work in organized shops and trades this summer. 
This apparently is to be a probing operation. In 
a carefully drawn plan, SDS is advising its mem- 
bers to exercise great caution in seeking to infiltrate 
organized plants and trades. 

"After you are there a month or so," SDS tells 
its members, "try to pick a few workers who are 
interested in your ideas and who have friends in 
the shop. Concentrate on individual discussions, 
with the hope of keeping these workers as con- 
tacts after you leave." 

SDS further warns: "We can't expect wild things 
in three months, but we can begin to question, to 
point out relationships they might not have thought 
about or might be afraid to express out loud. And 
we can begin to learn how to express these ideas 
without being presumptuous or arrogant." 

"Don't feel compelled to give leadership on all 
questions," is a further piece of advice given by 
SDS. 

From all this, it is clear that SDS intends to or- 
ganize the same kind of disruptive, destructive, and 
senseless campaign against organized labor that 
they have mounted against the universities. 



Their real aim is to bring the American society 
to its knees. And the fact that the Chinese and 
Vietcong flags and propaganda are so often a part 
of SDS operations, makes it suspect that they have 
outside support and direction from acknowledged 
enemies of America. 

I believe SDS will have a much rougher time 
trying to disrupt the labor movement than they 
have had on the college campuses. While most 
college professors are learned men in one or two 
narrow fields, too often they are naive, impracti- 
cal and timid. They cannot cope with rough and 
tumble politics or match muscle with muscle. They 
are long on theory, short on practice. 

On the other hand, some union leaders may be 
shy on some of the deeper academic subjects, but 
they all have solid acquaintance with the facts of 
life — with holding a job, butting heads with an 
arrogant employer, fighting off insidious assaults 
of the Communists from whose book SDS is tak- 
ing a page. 

They will not run from the threat of a confronta- 
tion; neither will they quail at the thought that 
head-knocking may become inevitable. 

So far, SDS is winning the big battles in the 
universities. If they can win in the labor movement 
too, they will have destroyed America, something 
the old line Communists could not do. 

It was the labor movement which defeated the 
Communist drive in the 30's and 40's. Perhaps, it's 
the destiny of the labor movement to give SDS 
its comeuppance in the 1970's, particularly now 
that SDS has made plain its intention to extend 
the battle line from the college campus to the 
factory floor. B 



40 



THE CARPENTER 




There was no standardization, even in weights and measures, in 18th-century Europe. 
Therefore, at that time, one's own scales and standards were an absolute necessity. 
The old balance-maker's shop was a lively place. The customer with her scales to be repaired 
has at best but half the attention of the craftsman who is filing a beam. Be- 



Si 



ft 






side him another artisan is testing the final balance of a pair of scales. At 

the right a third man is melting on a brazier a spoonful of lead, with which 

he will cast a weight. 

In contrast to this way of working, today's complex automated microscopic 

and electronic controls — coupled with the highest work standards and closest 

tolerances anywhere in the world — make the products of American and 

Canadian craftsmen the envy of many another land. These are the intangible benefits 

that have resulted from our "free-choice" way of life which tip the balance in our favor 

whenever it comes to any competitive showdown in which we are truly interested. 







H^J 



IHE FREE RIDER'S CREED 

The dues-paying member is my shepherd; I shall not want. 

He provideth me with paid holidays and vacation, so I may 
continue to lie down idle in green pastures beside the 
still waters. 

He restoreth my back pay. 

He guideth my welfare without cost to me. 

Yea, though I alibi and pay no dues from year to year, I fear 
no evil, for he pays my way and protecteth me. 

The working conditions he provideth, they comfort me. 

He anointeth my head with the oil of seniority. 

He fighteth my battle for pay raises. 

Yea, my cup runneth over with benefits. 

Surely, his goodness and union spirit will 
follow me all the days of my life, 
free of cost. 

And I shall dwell in the union house that he 
hath built forever, and allow him to 
pay the bill. 



The 



JULY, 1969 




Official Publication of the UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA • FOUNDED 1881 



1 



' "^~* *JMSi 






HQjB 



»- 



~*mm*u>+ m+qtV 



?m&: 



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"Beyond the countryside lie the lands largely uninhabited 

or undisturbed by man. These remote mountains, forests and 

deserts include the remnants of primeval America. 

"Here, the more expansive forest and park lands offer opportunities 

for memorable outdoor experiences in surroundings of 

superlative natural beauty." 

—FROM SEA TO SHINING SEA 
The President's Council on Recreation and Natural Beauty 



** 





H 



■■■■h 




GENERAL OFFICERS OF 

THE UNITED BROTHERHOOD of CARPENTERS & JOINERS of AMERICA 



GENERAL OFFICE: 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20001 



GENERAL PRESIDENT 

M. A. Hutcheson 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

FIRST GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

Finlay C. Allan 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

SECOND GENERAL VICE PRESIDENT 

William Sidell 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL SECRETARY 

R. E. Livingston 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 

GENERAL TREASURER 

Peter Terzick 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D. C. 20001 



DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS 



Secretaries, Please Note 

Now that the mailing list of The Carpen- 
ter is on the computer, it is no longer 
necessary for the financial secretary to 
send in the names of members who die or 
are suspended. Such members are auto- 
matically dropped from the mail list. 

The only names which the financial sec- 
retary needs to send in are the names of 
members who are NOT receiving the mag- 
azine. 

In sending in the names of members who 
are not getting the magazine, the new ad- 
dress forms mailed out with each monthly 
bill should be used. Please see that the 
Zip Code of the member is included. When 
a member clears out of one Local Union 
into another, his name is automatically 
dropped from the mail list of the Local 
Union he cleared out of. Therefore, the 
secretary of the Union into which he 
cleared should forward his name to the 
General Secretary for inclusion on the 
mail list. Do not forget the Zip Code 
number. 



First District, Charles Johnson, Jr. 
Ill E. 22nd St., New York, N. Y. 10010 

Second District, Raleigh Rajoppi 
2 Prospect Place, Springfield, New Jersey 
07081 

Third District, Cecil Shuey 
Route 3, Monticello, Indiana 47960 

Fourth District, Herbert C. Skinner 

101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 
Washington, D. C. 20001 

Fifth District, Leon W. Greene 
18 Norbert Place, St. Paul, Minn. 55116 



Sixth District, James O. Mack 
5740 Lydia, Kansas City, Mo. 64110 

Seventh District, Lyle J. Hiller 
Room 722, Oregon Nat'l Bank Bldg. 
610 S.W. Alder Street 
Portland, Oregon 97205 

Eighth District, Charles E. Nichols 
53 Moonlit Circle, Sacramento, Calif. 
95831 

Ninth District, William Stefanovitch 
1697 Glendale Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 

Tenth District, George Bengough 
2528 E. 8th Ave., Vancouver 12, B. C. 




M. A. Hutcheson, Chairman 
R. E. Livingston, Secretary 

Correspondence for the General Executive Board 
should be sent to the General Secretary. 






PLEASE KEEP THE CARPENTER ADVISED 
OF YOUR CHANGE OF ADDRESS 

PLEASE NOTE: Filling out this coupon and mailing it to the CARPEN- 
TER only corrects your mailing address for the magazine. It does not 
advise your own local union of your address change. You must notify 
your local union by some other method. 

This coupon should be mailed to THE CARPENTER, 
101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 



NAME 



Local # 



Number of your Local Union must 
be given. Otherwise, no action can 
be taken on your change of address. 



NEW ADDRESS 



City 



State 



ZIP Code 



THE 



(5£\D3E>BK]tf 





VOLUME LXXXIX 



No. 7 



JULY, 1969 



UNITED BROTHERHOOD OF CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF AMERICA 

Peter Terzick, Editor 



IN THIS ISSUE 

NEWS AND FEATURES 

Brotherhood Signs Pioneering Modular Construction Agreements 1 

Independence Day Celebrations . . . How They Began 5 

The Great Canadian Oil Sands Athabasca Project 6 

The National Timber Supply Act of 1969 8 

1969 Union Industries Show Marks Debut of Union-Built Hall . . 10 

Chandler Retires, Skinner Named 13 

Service Contracts May Not Be for You 20 

The 1969 CLIC Campaign 33 

DEPARTMENTS 

Washington Roundup 4 

Editorials 9 

Canadian Report 18 

Plane Gossip 21 

Outdoor Meanderings Fred Goetz 22 

What's New? 24 

Of Interest to Our Industrial Locals Research Dept. 25 

What's New in Apprenticeship and Training 26 

Service to the Brotherhood 31 

We Congratulate 35 

In Memoriam 36 

Lakeland News 39 

In Conclusion M. A. Hutcheson 40 



POSTMASTERS ATTENTION: Change of address cards on Form 3579 should bo sent to 
THE CARPENTER, Carpenters' Building, 101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20001 

Published monthly at 810 Rhode Island Ave., N.E.. Washington, D. C. 20018, by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Second class postage paid at Washington, 
D. C. Subscription price: United States and Canada $2 per year, single copies 20c in advance. 



Printed in U. S. A. 



THE COVER 

Sheep graze peacefully at a water 
hole in Monument Valley, Arizona. 
In the background, on this clear sum- 
mer day, there can be seen two mesas 
— "Right Mitten" and "Left Mitten." 
named that way because of their 
appearance and the position of the 
"thumbs." 

The Valley acquired its name from 
the hundreds of natural land forma- 
tions in the area which look as if they 
had been constructed by man, perhaps 
as monuments to nature. This area is 
one of seven tribal parks on the Nav- 
ajo Reservation in northeastern Ari- 
zona. These parks have been under 
Indian control since 1868. 

Since Monument Valley is a part 
of the reservation, tourists will find 
Navajo families living and raising 
sheep in this 30,000-acre area. Thou- 
sands visit the Park yearly to see Nav- 
ajo life as it was lived generations ago 
and to buy the famed Navajo jewelry 
and rugs — all of which are handmade. 
Camping facilities are also available. 

The land formations which give the 
Valley its distinctive name have a 
unique history. Formed as smooth 
hills during the great land upheavals 
of the miocene epoch (28 million years 
ago), they owe their present condition 
to the effects of wind and water ero- 
sion over the millenniums. A mesa 
is a high plateau with a flat table top 
and steep sides. 

The photograph is by Ralph R. 
Payton of Carmel Valley, California. 




Brotherhood 

Signs 

Pioneering 

Modular 

Construction 

Agreements 




Carpenter General President Maurice Hutcheson, President of Stirling Homex Cor- 
poration David Stirling and mediator Theodore Kheel (from left to right with their 
backs to the camera) announce the first national contract guaranteeing all union- 
built manufactured housing. This press conference which was attended by the na- 
tional news media was held in the Board Room of the Carpenter's building in 
Washington, D.C. 




oooo 



■ Modular construction, with mod- 
ules built in "housing factories," 
then transported to the building site, 
where they are permanently erected, 
is well on its way toward providing 
a substantial share of the housing 
needed by today's exploding U. S. 
population. 

Knowledgeable scientists con- 
cerned with the subject agree that, 
in the next 30 to 50 years, the pop- 
ulation of the U.S. will go from 200 
to 400 million. Eighty per cent of 
the 400 million will live in extreme- 
ly complex urban centers where 
planners' special knowledges and 
skills will be required to solve the 
problems of traffic, pure water, clean 
air, garbage removal, schools, hos- 
pitals and, of course, housing. 

The announced objective of the 




David Stirling, George Romney, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 
and General President Hutcheson (from left to right) are all smiles at the contract 
signing announcement. 



THE CARPENTER 




So-called "instant housing", all of which will be union made, 
(above) will help to alleviate the increasing-critical housing 
shortage in the United States. Experts say the population will 
grow from 200 to 400 million people in the next 50 years. 

Manufactured housing translates assembly line techniques into 
the building of housing components (right). The modules are 
built from the floor up, with wiring, plumbing, windows and 
even carpeting included. 



Federal government is the erection 
of 26 million new low and middle- 
income homes during the next ten 
years. It is doubtful if this goal can 
be achieved by conventional con- 
struction methods alone. Therefore, 
a substantial growth in prefabrica- 
tion — as predicted in The Battelle 
Report — is certain to take place. 

Our Brotherhood has had con- 
tracts with companies producing 
prefabricated houses or house com- 
ponents over a great many years. 
We have the skills and experience 
to meet whatever challenges the 
future may bring. 

Last month this statement was 
substantiated by the signing of an 
agreement between our Brotherhood 
and the Stirling Homex Corporation 
of Avon, N. Y., covering the con- 
struction of thousands of factory- 
huilt houses in several Eastern states. 
Last year an agreement covering the 
in-plant employees was signed with 
the Company. 



Under the terms of the new Na- 
tional Agreement our Brotherhood 
commits itself to furnish competent 
journeymen on a non-discriminatory 
basis to erect Stirling Homex mod- 
ules anywhere in the Nation. In re- 
turn. Stirling Homex agrees to recog- 
nize the jurisdiction of our Brother- 
hood and not to sub-contract any 
work within our jurisdiction on the 
job-site except to a contractor who 
holds an agreement with our orga- 
nization. 

With the signing of the two agree- 
ments. Stirling Homex homes will be 
10092 union-made and erected. 

Eventually, the Company expects 



to expand its operations to cover 
most parts of the United States and 
Canada. 

In commenting on the importance 
of the contract. General President 
Hutcheson said: 

"Once again the flexibility and in- 
ventiveness of the construction in- 
dustry is being brought to bear on a 
national crisis. The need for good 
quality housing for low income as 
well as middle income families con- 
tinues to grow at a staggering rate. 
Federal, state and local governments 
cannot possibly solve this tremen- 
dous problem alone. 

Continued on Page 38 



JULY, 1969 




ROUNDUP 



HOPE FOR COMMUTERS— The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, which has 
plans for a 97.7-mile rapid rail system to relieve the traffic headaches of the 
nation's capital, says it can "begin construction "within 75 days" of the date 
Congress approves an Administration request of $18.7 million for the project. 
Surrounding counties in Maryland and Virginia have already agreed to share their 
portion of the financing of the vital undertaking. 

EXCESS WAR PROFITS— Fifteen U.S. senators are sponsoring legislation which would 
impose an excess profits tax on income received by defense industries because of 
the war in Vietnam. Senators George McGovern, Mike Mansfield, and others say such 
a tax would raise $9.5 billion to $10 billion a year and could supplant the 10% 
Federal income surtax. 

WAGE GARNISHMENT can imperil your job, reports the Bureau of National Affairs, a 
private Washington organization. In a recent survey of personnel executives, BNA 
found that an employee whose wages are garnisheed may get away with an oral 
warning the first time, and a written warning or suspension the second time. But 
a third offense could mean discharge. 

SCHNITZLER DINNER- Retiring AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer William F. Schnitzler will 
be honored by the Federation at a retirement dinner July 17 in Washington. 

In a letter to all affiliates and all state and city cental bodies, AFL-CIO 

President George Meany said that the dinner, to be held at the Shoreham Hotel, 

would pay "public honor to a man who has been a staunch trade unionist and warm 
friend." 

The dinner committee will be chaired by AFL-CIO Vice President and Brother- 
hood General President Maurice A. Hutcheson. Other committee members are Vice 
Presidents James Suff ridge, Hunter Wharton, Paul Jennings and Matthew Guinan. 

SUPREME COURT RULING— The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that a legitimate card 
count can be construed as a representation election victory and thus serve as 
the basis for forcing management to bargain with unions. 

The broad tenor of the Court's decision states that cards must be unambigu- 
ous in stating that the signer has designated the union as his bargaining agent 
and that the employer has engaged in unfair labor practices in fighting organiza- 
tion of his plant. 

The High Court declined to rule on a union request that employers be forced 
to bargain on the basis of a card count majority if no unfair labor practice is 
involved. 



NLRB UPHELD — The Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has agreed with the National 
Labor Relations Board that a union may bring its own time study experts into a 
plant in order to make "an intelligent decision" about a grievance. 

Stemming from a union complaint that a General Electric plant was guilty 
of unfair labor practices in this regard, the court's decision stated "Unions 
as well as employers may act reasonably, and obtention of the information sought 
may well lead the union ... to agree to a settlement at an early stage of the 
grievance. " 

4 THE CARPENTER 



John Nixon, shown at right (no relation 

to the President), was the first man to publicly 

read the Declaration of Independence on 

July 8, 1776, in Independence Square, 

Philadelphia. 

The line engraving at extreme right, which 

appeared in 1783, depicts the American 

colonists declaring their independence from 

King George III of England and thus starting 

the Revolutionary War. 



Independence Day Celebrations 
... How They Began 

•*•••*• 




■ The first July 4 celebrations set 
a pattern that has made the Fourth 
glorious ever since. 

Parades, fireworks, speeches, 
band music, and general jubilation 
marked the early observances, the 
National Geographic Society says. 

On July 8, 1776, a large crowd 
of Philadelphians gathered in In- 
dependence Square to listen to John 
Nixon read the Declaration of In- 
dependence, adopted four days be- 
fore. Nixon stood on a platform 
that the American Philosophical So- 
ciety had erected a few years earlier 
to observe the transit of Venus. 

Charles Biddle. of the famous 
Philadelphia Biddies, said of the 
first Fourth: "There were few re- 
spectable persons present." 

John Adams, however, was more 
enthusiastic. He wrote: "Three 
cheers rended the welkin. The bat- 
talions paraded on the Common and 
gave us the fue de joie (salute), 
notwithstanding the scarcity of 
powder. The bells rang all day and 
almost all night." 

Next year, two days before July 
4, it occurred to the Continental 
Congress that something should be 
done about the first anniversary of 



the Declaration. Arrangements were 
quickly made to adjourn Congress 
for the day, and hold a special din- 
ner in Philadelphia. 

In a letter to his daughter, John 
Adams described the festivities: 
Bells rang all day, there were bon- 
fires in the streets and fireworks 
in the evening. Warships in the river 
broke out their flags and fired 
salutes. 

A captured Hessian band fur- 
nished the music for the special 
dinner, served at 3 p.m. in a city 
tavern. 

Taking a stroll that evening, 
Adams "was surprised to find the 
whole city lighting up candles at 
the windows. I walked most of the 
evening and I think it was the most 
splendid illumination I ever saw; a 
few surly houses were dark, but 
the lights were very universal." 

The dark houses presumably be- 
longed to royalists. Later in the 
evening, some of the unlighted win- 
dows were broken by patriots. 

In 1788, Philadelphia again cele- 
brated the Fourth and also the re- 
cent ratification of the Constitution 
with a three-hour parade. A car- 
riage in the shape of an eagle car- 



ried the Constitution, which was 
framed and fixed on a staff crowned 
with a liberty cap. 

During the next 25 years, Inde- 
pendence Day was observed as a 
primarily partisan celebration. The 
party in power regularly excluded 
its opponents from the festivities. 
In 1800, two Philadelphia school- 
masters, staunch Federalists, stalked 
out of a Fourth of July exercise 
when a pupil insisted on reading 
the Declaration of Independence. 
That seditious document was too 
closely associated with Thomas Jef- 
ferson, a Republican (Democrat). 

Many citizens were reluctant to 
take part in Fourth of July cere- 
monies dominated by what one 
newspaper called "office seekers 
and demagogues." It urged the gen- 
eral public to turn out and break 
the politicians* monopoly on July 4. 

The partisan spirit had subsided 
by 1826. The 50th anniversary of 
the Declaration of Independence 
was widely celebrated as a commu- 
nity affair with parades and picnics. 
A remarkable but sad coincidence 
on July 4, 1826. further helped knit 
together the young nation. On that 
day, both John Adams and Thomas 
Jefferson died. ■ 



JULY, 1969 




An aerial view of the Athabasca Mining Plant in Alberta, Canada reveals its 
immense size. This plant represents the first commercial-scale extraction op- 
eration for high recovery of bitumen from sand. More than 300 billion barrels 
of synthetic crude oil are expected to be recovered. 



Major engineering breakthrough permits extraction of oil 

from one of the world's largest untapped reserves. Union 

carpenters and millwrights chalk up 650,000 manhours. 





The high speed conveyor belt, left, car- 
ries oil sand at the rate of 1,100 feet 
a minute, before depositiing it into a 
holding bin. 



■ Along the upper reaches of the 
Athabasca River, which flows 765 
miles north and northeast from its 
sources in central Alberta to its out- 
flow in Lake Athabasca on the 
Alberta-Saskatchewan border, are 
deposits of siliceous marlstone, up 
to 300 feet deep and spread over an 
area of about 21,000 square miles. 

The riparian sands are soaked 
with bitumen in such quantity that, 



by long-standing geological consen- 
sus, the deposits equal known con- 
ventional oil reserves in the free 
world. Of the estimated 600 billion 
barrels of oil locked in the sands 
of Athabasca, 300 billion barrels 
are deemed recoverable. 

The long-standing problem has 
been how to extract the oil from the 
sands by methods that are at once 
feasible and economic. 

Now in operation, 20 miles north 
of Fort McMurray, is the first large- 
scale answer to this challenging 
problem — a massive and complex 
extraction-processing plant, designed 

THE CARPENTER 




The oil sand gathered by the excavator drops onto the belt 
wagon, which takes it to the conveyor. The primary' extrac- 
tion building is at right. 




Another view of the mining operation gives a closer look at 
the bucket-wheel excavator, belt wagon and the conveyor belt 
system. 



and built by Canadian Bechtel Lim- 
ited for Great Canadian Oil Sands 
Limited, in which the Sun Oil Com- 
pany Limited holds the major com- 
mon stock equity. 

Union carpenters and millwrights 
played an important role in the 
construction of the extraction-proc- 
essing plant. At the peak. Canadian 
Bechtel employed 161 carpenters 
and 59 millwrights. Total manhours 
worked by both millwrights and 
carpenters was in excess of 650.000. 
Carpenters Local 1325 and Mill- 
wrights Local 1460. both of Ed- 



monton. Alberta, had jurisdiction at 
the project. 

How It Began 

The history of how this unique 
solution to one of the world's most 
besetting problems — the need for 
oil which supplies the liquid sinews 
that make our modern technology- 
engendered civilization possible — 
began in 1962. when CBL was se- 
lected to work with the GCOS engi- 
neering stafT in establishing design 
and engineering criteria for the job. 
The result was not only a major 
engineering breakthrough in the ex- 



traction of oil from one of the 
world's largest untapped oil reserves, 
but also one of the largest single 
investments ever undertaken by pri- 
vate hands in the Dominion of Can- 
ada. This investment equals more 
than half of the Canadian Govern- 
ment's investment in the St. Law- 
rence Seaway. 

Another important step was 
taken in 1964, when the Alberta 
Gas and Conservation Board granted 
GCOS the first major license for the 
extraction of oil from the Athabasca 
tar sands. 

The GCOS Project has been a 
classic illustration of how designers, 
engineers, estimators, constructors, 
procurement specialists, and almost 
every type of skill and ingenuity 
brought together in a single engi- 
neering-construction firm, can pool 
their resources in a common, inte- 
grated effort. 

The engineering alone is a notable 
thing. Here, for the first time, is a 
full-scale complex that is a unique 
solution for unlocking a primary 
natural resource from a complex 
primary natural condition. The 
GCOS complex is also one of the 
most self-sustaining plants ever de- 
vised. Two giant bucket-wheel exca- 
vators dig the tar sands from an open 
pit at the rate of 100,000 tons per 
day. The sands are conveyed, via a 
high-speed conveyor system to a pri- 
mary extraction plant where the bi- 
tumen is separated from the sands 
by a hot water and steam process, 
a diluting agent is added, and thence 
conveyed to a centrifuge-type final 
extraction plant where water and still 
more mineral matter are removed. 

Processing Bitumen 

The bitumen then is pumped to 
the coking unit, which has six of the 
biggest delayed coking drums ever 
built. Following removal of the sol- 
vent, it is cracked under high tem- 
perature in the coking drums. Re- 
sultant vapors are drawn off to be 
separated into gas. crude naphtha, 
kerosene, and gas oil. which later 
are recombincd into synthetic crude. 

The coke that cakes on the sides 
of the cokers is periodically re- 
moved, pulverized, and used to fire 
the 65.000-kilowatt steam-electric 
generating plant, which powers the 
whole Athabasca operation. Very 
Continued on page 30 



JULY, 1969 



The National Timb